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The use of drugs for treating myopia.
#1
Hello, I'm new here. I am in my first year of pharmacy college and I have learned a few drugs that act on the eyes and I have been studying the eyes and myopia. I am here to start a topic to see if drugs can be used to treat it. I am just going to talk about what I learned from my research so far, I am still a student and I would be happy if someone corrected me.

I think I have acquired myopia or self induced myopia from being too close to a computer screen and bad eye habits for so many years. I think what happens is the ciliary muscle in the eye that controls focusing becomes over works and spasms. Just like any other muscle would from over use, the ciliary muscle contracts for near vision and prolong contraction causes this spasm. The muscle then does not want to relax for far vision, I believe because trigger points form in it. Trigger points are sore spots you can feel in your skeletal muscles like on your back, a spot that feels really tender and releases when massaged. Trigger points in the cililary muscle are not as easly treated though because they are inside your eye.

I think this type of self induced myopia can be cured by drugs such as tropicamide and atropine. Tropicamide paralysis the ciliary muscle, its the eye drops that optometrists use to dilate the pupil for eye exams so I heard. I never actually had an eye exam where it was used though.

So I think with the cililary muscle paralyzed it will be completely relaxed for far vision I should be able to see perfectly at far vision. I think the use of such eye drops would loosen up the eye muscles which are tight and cant relax for far vision.

I think the palming method works on the same principles, when you cup your eyes your puplis dialate which also causes your cililary muscle to dialate and relax.

I also think this is how the Bates method works. The exercises help you to slowly relax your cililary muscle making it more flexable. I have not read bates book, but I believe that the use of tropicamide could be an easier and much faster way to cure myopia or could suppliment the exercises.
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#2
Dear Friend,

Subject: The effect of atropine on the eye's refractive STATE.

You are correct. A doctor (I think his name was Bedrossian) used a drug on a person whose vision
was going down at a rate of about -1 diopter per year.


Quote:I think this type of self induced myopia can be cured by drugs such as tropicamide and atropine. Tropicamide paralysis the ciliary muscle, its the eye drops that optometrists use to dilate the pupil for eye exams so I heard. I never actually had an eye exam where it was used though.

He used atropine on one eye (effectively freezing it, or inducing paralysis -- so the eye could not "accommodate") and did
nothing to the other eye, other than the normal mins lens.

The result?

The eye with the drug in it stopped going down.

The other eye kept going down at a rate of -1 diopter per year.

I think the adverse effects of atropine would prevent its use.

Other preventive methods Bates/Prentice are used. They do not have the
adverse effect that drugs do.

But as always -- opinions on this subject are up to the person
doing the evaluation.

Enjoy,

Otis
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#3
Interesting.. but even if the drugs could help myopia, they would not be a quick fix, especially not for someone that
might have a higher prescription. How long then would you be taking this drug for? 6 months ? 1 year?
I don't advocate the use of drugs to cure..drugs don't cure. Basically you would be trying to 'cure' your myopia -your eyes-and at the same time, put toxins into your other organs.. your eyes are also organs. I got terrible hairy floaters from various eye medications due to a potential serious eye infection. I had no choice in order to save my eye (the only time drugs can be applauded). No.. there is no such thing as a drug without side effects and I am not an advocate of Big PHARMA. I'd rather use eye drops like CAN-C nacetylcarnosine eyedrops or Dr. Christopher's Cayenne Eyebright Eyewash (which healed my floaters), eat well and do Bates. Just yesterday I read on Mercola that those that have adequate Vitamin D levels (probably those that live in the sunny south) have less myopia.

There is always a reason for something, and sometimes it is more than one factor, but drugs are not the answer for me.. I'd
rather take responsibility.

Regards, Its Smile me
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#4
itsme, I am just a young pharmacy student and the dosage schedule for tropicamide is beyond the scope of what I know. That would have to be handled by researchers. I'm just amazed that no one has started making drugs for myopia treatment.

I would probably suggest a low dosage, one drop of 0.1% in each eye before bedtime each day. This dosage would not cause much side effects.

Also itsme, if you're not an advocate of big pharmacy I know of other homeopathic myopia drugs like eyebright that can help.

I take physostigma 30c 5 times daily, I can tell you it has reduced my myopia greatly. The drug is made from a calabar bean, its all natural. Its safe to use, I have not seen any side effects. I buy my phyostigma from Boiron its really cheap, 80 30c pellets for about 7 dollars. You can buy higher dosage pellets for the same price too.

The only drawback about phyostigma is the way it works, it uses a slower mechanism of action to tropicamide. So you will have to take physotigma for about a week to see results, It should cure myopia in about half a year. My myopia is almost gone, and I have been taking it for about 3 months while doing a few eye exercises.
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#5
WOW, great post...your myopia is nearly gone by taking Physostigma 30c for 3 months?! I began taking it (can't remember if it was 6c or 30c but didn't carry on - forget why...)

Can I ask what your prescription was originally? And do you wear glasses now?

I have been doing vision improvement on and off for a couple of years now. Was about -4 at my last test 2 yrs ago, which was an improvement but I really would like not to wear glasses at all any more...
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#6
hi everyone..
thanks for the information you given..
btw im new in this site and i want to learn more in your site..
thanks a lot and GOD BLESS...






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#7
what does physostigma actually do though? if it just constricts the pupils then that acts as a pinhole effect giving the illusion of improved eyesight?
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#8
Sound's like someone was reading this thread lol....

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/articl...drops.html
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#9
any follow up on this?

i have been having success using trigger points in the back with a theracane and testing on a 3D Eye Chart.

but am interested in enhancing the results with herbal relaxants.
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#10
I can remember back in the mid 1950's,when in junior high school,there were several classmates that were prescribed their first pair or minus glasses,and along with them were prescribed Atropine drops for regular use.
The one boy that I remember the most had really thick lenses for a first prescription.
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#11
I believe Dr. Bates actually used atrophine for treating some conditions, along with the other things. But because it's a drug, I wouldn't feel safe even thinking of using it without a prescription from an opthamologist. Of course Bates was an opthamologist, but he's long dead. No prescription from him to me that would hold up in a court of law. Lol
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