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better vision habits (split from: Need Help going cold ...)
#1
I have a question about practicing better vision habits:

Whenever i look at something i try to keep my eyes scanning over the object, instead of staring at it. Is this "sketching"?

And staring! I do that quite a bit myself. I notice I stare most when i'm around people...replaying what i've just said and/or staring at people, usually analyzing them and their behavior, ect...

When i catch myself my eyes go back to movement, its like I dis-anchor my eyes.

I wonder if myopic people have different R.E.M. during sleep than healthy seers, since the movement has been inhibited during waking hours.
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#2
I split this to a new topic so you might get replies instead of it being hidden in the unrelated thread.

I don't think of scanning or anchoring on to things as the only options. The right way is only a subtle change.

Try this just as an illustration - Look at an object the way you normally do, eyes tense and staring as if you're locking on to the object. Now turn your head a little bit from side to side. Nothing has changed, right? You still feel like you're staring, and it's still blurry.Your eyes had to move to stay "locked on" to an object while your head turned, but it sure didn't feel like the movement did you any good, right?

This is because it isn't about whether your eyes move. It's about how you think about what you're seeing and treat what you're seeing, and your eyes moving happens on its own as a consequence. "Locking on" to objects is how we see. Someone with blurry vision locks on to a larger area without looking specifically at any details, and a person with normal vision locks on ONLY to details and keeps noting other details, which also stimulates better saccadic eye movement, which is non-controllable.

Dave
Site Administrator

"Half of our funny, heathen lives, we are bent double to gather things we have tossed away." - George Meredith
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#3
thanks-

You said scanning and 'anchoring" arent the only options, did you mean scanning and sketching? Because i meant anchoring as something unhelpful, like a deep locked on stare.

David Wrote:Someone with blurry vision locks on to a larger area without looking specifically at any details, and a person with normal vision locks on ONLY to details and keeps noting other details, which also stimulates better saccadic eye movement, which is non-controllable.

^ Definately makes sense. As i look at my mailbox i just throw my eyes in its direction waiting, trying to make it suddenly come in clear...when really a 20/20 eye is unforcefully and naturally sketching up the post and around the box, the little red flag...allowing it to be seen and to come in clearly, so the sketching and seeing comes as a consequence...makes sense.
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#4
wow dave this technique has been good for me. I've been able to see things a little clearer than usual. Before i was always avoiding locking on because for some reason i was thinking movement must be drastic, so i'd keep my eyes moving big like this guy: :Smile but like you said, look at something and change the way you think about it and your eyes naturally move the way they need to... more like this guy: :o
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#5
That's right.

For that matter, I think a lot of people get mixed up between doing exercises and practicing good vision habits. For example, you don't do the long swing in order to see something, and you don't shift back and forth between 2 points either. Those are exercises that would be done for a few minutes or longer. You have to use common sense in considering whether it makes sense as something that people with normal vision do. If you're moving your eyes in a continuous motion without stopping for a brief moment on points, you're not interested in what you're seeing, and your eyes aren't going to bother focusing if you don't care. It's a balance you have to find, being engaged in seeing the details without actually doing anything with your eyes to focus. That's one of the main bad habits - tensing your eyes every time you look at details.

No matter how blurry something appears, it still has the same number of details as before. You still have the same number of retinal cells receiving the light. It's blurry because you treat it as blur, all the same, no focal point. If you practice looking at the details of the blur, that which you're looking at ceases to be blur and becomes scattered details of multiple images and pieces in the wrong spots, and in doing that your eyes are given the signal to focus, and the scattered details start becoming more aligned details as the focus is corrected. It's a rough process that you will be rusty at as your vision changes, distorts, and your eyes sting or whatever as things start working together again in the moment, and as long as you stay focused on seeing whatever types of details are available, your visual system is encouraged more and more to restore correct functioning.

Of course, my description of the process of what instigates the eyes to focus might not be entirely correct, but I think that's basically what happens.

Dave
Site Administrator

"Half of our funny, heathen lives, we are bent double to gather things we have tossed away." - George Meredith
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#6
David Wrote:It's about how you think about what you're seeing and treat what you're seeing, and your eyes moving happens on its own as a consequence.

How do clear seeing people think and treat the objects they look at? compared to those with bad vision? (maybe myope's have worrisome thoughts they unconsciously think? treating objects as untrustworthy threats...)

David Wrote:It's a rough process that you will be rusty at as your vision changes, distorts, and your eyes sting or whatever as things start working together again in the moment, and as long as you stay focused on seeing whatever types of details are available, your visual system is encouraged more and more to restore correct functioning.

I've been looking at objects and focusing on the details like you recommended, and i naturally blink a lot softer and lighter...but like you also said, my eyes sting! even though i'm blinking plenty much...

things will come in clearly more often as i do this though! Its exciting but i cant distinguish between whether its my eye's relaxing and seeing clear-or if its that thin layer of tear that acts as a lens....
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#7
Don't try to make it more complex than it needs to be. That's partly why you're in this mess. Seeing the right way is simpler, easier and more effective, almost like not doing anything at all. Seeing poorly requires you to do all sorts of things to tense your eyes and try to use your visual system in a way that doesn't work. A person with normal vision searches always for smaller points of detail. Even in blur, there is just as much detail if you look at it that way. If your eyes sting, don't use it as an excuse to stop searching for details.

Dave
Site Administrator

"Half of our funny, heathen lives, we are bent double to gather things we have tossed away." - George Meredith
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#8
spydermann Wrote:How do clear seeing people think and treat the objects they look at? compared to those with bad vision? (maybe myope's have worrisome thoughts they unconsciously think? treating objects as untrustworthy threats...)
I think at least for me, I see better when I am more aware of the distance. For example, I'm sitting in front of my computer, and right now my computer is sort of my "world". But I could be more aware of the bigger picture (quite literally) and know that I'm sitting in front of a computer in one of the rooms of my house. And even bigger-- the city is around me, and I am a citizen and a consumer in it, etc.

Although, this improved vision when I'm more aware of space might simply be because I look into the distance more often, so I can't be sure.
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#9
Summon-Pretty-Peace Wrote:I see better when I am more aware of the distance

yeah i notice a different sensation when I become aware of distance. More of a whole body feeling sensation...

David Wrote:Even in blur, there is just as much detail if you look at it that way

My eyes flow around my environment and I pick an object and focus on it, breathe, and blink lightly...between my blinks the object might become a little clearer then blurry, then clear...which makes me think it might be tear-made clarity... but as I keep my eyes scanning over the object I try to notice the details like you mentioned.

How can I find a balance between trying to see the details without trying to hard and making it complex? O0
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#10
It's a balance that you have to delicately mess with when your eyes start to focus and your vision fluctuates as you look at something. Putting up the minimum effort required just to move your eyes, and no more.

Instead of focusing on an object, look at a small point. Even if it's just an indiscernible speck of blur. And then look at another.

Dave
Site Administrator

"Half of our funny, heathen lives, we are bent double to gather things we have tossed away." - George Meredith
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#11
this is pretty interesting you guys thanks for helping me out, its like relearning how to walk...or how to drive.
going from speck of blur to blur, I've been doing this and noticing how 3D and picasso-style things look...its like looking at a broken mirror, a disorganized mess of little clear specks of potential clarity. But as long as I keep going piece to piece and relax...eventually they will all come together as a clear and whole image...maybe my first flash of clarity...I feel like I'm headed down the right path to it
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#12
Yes, that's good. That's the right step, seeing a mess of specks or multiple images instead of blur. Keep doing it for a few days, literally all the time, or every moment that you remember it. Momentum is important.

Dave
Site Administrator

"Half of our funny, heathen lives, we are bent double to gather things we have tossed away." - George Meredith
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#13
are the specks maybe the early stages of clarity--of what a reawakened rusty central fixation makes out of the blur? I'm becoming more aware of and noticing my old habit of doing that stagnant peripheral stare that tries to get the whole picture to come in clear... but as I'm understanding it, staring is like looking through a foggy window, and to see clear you must "wipe" the window clear with little circular motions... and at first the movements are slow and clumsy, and the window fogs back up before I can get it clear, but if the movements are practiced enough then they'll eventually become quick and fluid enough to keep the whole window clear. Is that somewhat the basic idea?
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#14
Right on the first part. I just goes to show how much of this really is a mental thing, with the mind treating differently the same visual input. The way it's processed mentally can waver as much as the focus of the eyes.

But I think you're off track on the cleaning a window analogy. Take an eye chart for example. The way each letter appears blurry has nothing to do with the letters themselves. It all happens inside of you. You don't have to look at each letter to work on making all the letters on the chart clearer.

Practicing eye movement by itself doesn't help, or at least it's very limited in benefit. The problem is not in the movement of the eyes; it's in the way you look at things. If you only allow yourself to look at specks of detail, your eyes will get to moving around to see them. It's not a matter of developing good vision; it's a matter of getting your vision back on track, and when you do that, everything starts falling into place because that's the way things are made to work. Your eyes suddenly feel more relaxed because they aren't being forced to strain to do something they can't do (see everything at once).

Say you're looking at a tree. If you look at the detail of an apple on a tree, your visual system will still take in everything else around it, and you will see the entire apple, the entire tree, and the things around the tree. But this only happens properly if you do your part by looking only at the details. It's partly a matter of trusting that this will happen. If you look at the whole tree and try to make sure that you see all of it at once, you mess up the whole process and don't see anything. Unfocused vision or blur is a signal that your process of seeing that you're trying to use is all wacky and won't work. Examine how you're doing this with various things throughout your day, and try to catch yourself each time in trying to see the whole thing suddenly.

Dave
Site Administrator

"Half of our funny, heathen lives, we are bent double to gather things we have tossed away." - George Meredith
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#15
David Wrote:If your eyes sting, don't use it as an excuse to stop searching for details.

Hi, I would like to explore the stinging eyes a bit further, as this is exactly what I find happens when I get clear flashes. The fact that my eyes were stinging was something I thought of as a problem, maybe that I was straining them in some way (aside from the fact that it felt so unpleasant that I felt the need to blink asap to get rid of the stinging!). I am interested to hear that it is not a problem at all. Do you have any ideas as to why they might be stinging at those times?

Thanks
Scott
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