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it works
#1
bates method. I've only glimpsed through the book "relearning to see"

since then I tried to not wear my glasses when possible. for the next three years, my sight stopped worsening as fast (went from 3.0 to 4.0), when in the first two years it felt REALLY bad. my greatest feelings are like when you cover your eyes and "tries" to see "perfect black." it's like, when it's working, "mists" stops and dissolves, and eventually you can see "patterns" and clear images in your head instead of the foggy image. also, sun gazing might work. what i do is that i try to close my eyes and "look" into the fluorescent light. feels just as good ;D

anyhow, a few month ago, there have been rapid improvements and my eyes *feels* like 1.5ish. I haven't gotten a chance to get it checked up it, but i've completely stopped wearing glasses altogether and is learning to "deal with it" or rather, allowing my eyes to naturally "adapt" without putting stress on it.

I think that when you're stressed in real life, and if your work requires close-up readings or you do computer video games a lot, then you're more likely to be in a state of "locked up" or getting worse. you just need something you can trust (i.e. other than glasses and contacts and such) so you can recognize when it's time to take a break , both mental and physical, from what you're doing. By simply recognizing the need to take a break actively, that's like the biggest part. I'm a student in psychology so I know how important cognitive recognition could be.

btw, i really don't like the captcha on the registration page. So hard to read lol.
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#2
Good for you! Yes, dealing with it and learning to relax, instead of slapping on glasses, is so much better for you, and feels better, too. I've also resented the italics on the daily caption which can easily cause me to strain, so now I see it as an invitation to relax further. I wonder if Dave did this on purpose...
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#3
zarakiMaster Wrote:my greatest feelings are like when you cover your eyes and "tries" to see "perfect black." it's like, when it's working, "mists" stops and dissolves, and eventually you can see "patterns" and clear images in your head instead of the foggy image.

Yes it is! Just thing about all that stuff you can see with your mind. You can have your own tv program!
Its like dreaming when you are awake and you can control the dream. Endless possibilities!

I actually have this stuff for some fractions of second and its cool!

Keep going!

20/20 is just average when you can have 40/10 Wink
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#4
umm, can you explain what's 20/20 or 40/10? I've always thought 20/20 meant perfect sight.

4.0, to my understanding, was my diopeters measurement, something about the curvature of the lenses. and i thought 0.0 meant 20/20?
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#5
I think this is how it goes:

20/20 means that the eye being measured can distinctly see letters/details of a certain height/size from 20 feet away - assuming that a normal eye also sees them clearly from 20 feet. Therefore that eye is 'normal' - IF 20/20 IS THE NORMAL STANDARD! But what if the normal standard is or should actually be 30/30? I.e., what if our general visual acuity has been slowly degrading?

20/40 would mean that your eye can only see clearly from 20 feet what a normal eye sees at 40 feet.
40/10 woud mean that your eagle eye can see clearly at 40 feet what a normal eye sees at 10 feet.

zarakiMaster Wrote:umm, can you explain what's 20/20 or 40/10? I've always thought 20/20 meant perfect sight.

4.0, to my understanding, was my diopeters measurement, something about the curvature of the lenses. and i thought 0.0 meant 20/20?
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#6
Very good zarakiMaster! So happy for you..yeah it really works..
Cool!
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#7
I agree with the idea of having your own TV program. Suddenly you become aware of this whole inventory of imagination you're equipped with. Then you can just crank out one image after another, static or in motion.

However, I don't think you wasted your life before you had this, it might be just that you were more occupied with your emotional side, this gives you an advantage when it comes to coping or feeling for others, dealing with events ahead a time. Ideally you will have something of both where you can just go back and forth as you please.
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#8
Before I read Relearning to See and took a course from Thomas Quackenbush I thought 20/20 and occasional 20/30 was the best I could do.
After his book, class, learning central fixation and how the fovea centralis works and combining shifting and central fixation together, noticing, moving the central field on tiny fine details, I went to 20/20 and clearer all distances.

Clark Night
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#9
Wow Clarknight!!! Great job!!!

It seems that the biggest reason for failing vision is that there is some kind of tension in your eyes, or generally, your whole body and that to overcome this and recover perfect 20/20 vision is to de-stress yourself and relax. It seems so easy and simple but us myopes have trouble with this, trying to unlearn bad habits that we have lived by for years.

What I'm wondering is, the main things you have to learn to do is to relax and try and make it a habit and let it become part of you naturally and the other is to try and focus constantly on smaller and smaller points with your central focus.

Which one is more important? It seems like you can get back 20/20 vision by learning central fixation but surely you must also learnt to relax? And how do you learn to constantly focus on smaller and smaller points when as a myope you can only see blur?

I would be grateful for any tips on how to learn central fixation and recover permanent 20/20 vision.
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#10
Aura Wrote:What I'm wondering is, the main things you have to learn to do is to relax and try and make it a habit and let it become part of you naturally and the other is to try and focus constantly on smaller and smaller points with your central focus.

Which one is more important? It seems like you can get back 20/20 vision by learning central fixation but surely you must also learnt to relax? And how do you learn to constantly focus on smaller and smaller points when as a myope you can only see blur?

I would be grateful for any tips on how to learn central fixation and recover permanent 20/20 vision.

In the first step you need to learn to relax with for instance palming.
In this first step relaxation is most important, but breathing correctly is also very important.
When you have learnt to relax your eyes with palming you shall go on with the second step.
In the second step it is more important to learn how to use your eyes such that you get correct visual habits that relaxes your eyes all by them selves, for instance central fixation or I would rather call it looking at details because it is how it is described on this forum. I think actually Clark Night had some good video that described how it shall be done.
In a third step you try to get sharp vision at near distances, and that helps out if you only see blur, because at near distance you can at least see good as a myope and that you shall use in combination with looking at details. If you just can see clearly at near distances you will very fast get to much sharper eyesight.
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#11
Aura Wrote:What I'm wondering is, the main things you have to learn to do is to relax and try and make it a habit and let it become part of you naturally and the other is to try and focus constantly on smaller and smaller points with your central focus.

Which one is more important? It seems like you can get back 20/20 vision by learning central fixation but surely you must also learnt to relax? And how do you learn to constantly focus on smaller and smaller points when as a myope you can only see blur?

These are not really 2 different things - to see a very small point really clear in the distance the eyes must be completely relaxed.
So you can combine both - looking at a small point as a relaxation exercise.

I'm using the eye-chart for this purpse (a bit in the same way as Emily cured her class mates: <!-- m --><a class="postlink" href="http://www.iblindness.org/books/perfect-sight-without-glasses/ch28.php">http://www.iblindness.org/books/perfect ... s/ch28.php</a><!-- m -->
)
I wrote about it:
"When I use the eye chart after palming it is not for 'testing' my eye-sight (it wouldn't even be possible because I know all the lines by heart after practising with it every day), but as a sort of 'feed-back'. The letters will only clear up, when my eyes are really relaxed, as I put the eye chart in a distance where I cant't read it without palming and relaxing. Then I try to keep up the relaxation long enough to read as much of the line as possible.
( I wrote about this in the 'success stories'; after startng at a little more than 2 feet, I now practise with the bottom line - which is to be read at a distance of 8 feet - at 5 feet)."
( <!-- l --><a class="postlink-local" href="http://www.iblindness.org/community/viewtopic.php?f=5&t=691&start=45">viewtopic.php?f=5&t=691&start=45</a><!-- l --> )

You can also use the eye-chart with unknown letters:
<!-- m --><a class="postlink" href="http://www.smbs.buffalo.edu/oph/ped/IVAC/IVAC.html">http://www.smbs.buffalo.edu/oph/ped/IVAC/IVAC.html</a><!-- m -->

To make this relaxed sight a habit 'in normal life', I try to:
1) not fight against the 'blurr' by straining my eyes, but instead just let the blurry vision be as it is
2) not to look at a great part at once, but let the eyes come to a rest in very small points

Now I started - especially when I ride my bicycle and can see a wide range in the nature - to 'let my eyes and brain alone' to find their way in getting to the best sight possible together, without interfering too much, not trying to direct my eyes how to see and always being aware of the seeing process.
I only watch a bit over the eyes, that they stay relaxed and try to keep (mental) stress away from my eyes. So I hope to establish slowly the habit of relaxed sight.
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#12
I'd like to share my thoughts with you all.

I've been doing the exercises for a few weeks now and have some measure of success with my amblyopia.

There is large psychological aspect to this arena. Increasingly, I'm seeing properly for just a moment when I put my eye patch on and look at the test card. Then something tells me this is my bad eye and caput-I can't see what's in my fovea's direction.

My mum has severe eye problems and I know she has become upset at not being able to see. When I first started experimenting using the eye patch, I felt a bit claustraphobic. It is the worst thing in the world to get upset with anything-especially with something like this. Only by relaxing and giving the right attention have I begun to see grey lines coming into view now. Maybe the trauma of having an eye problem when we were young has intensified it. It was an unpleasant emotion and I think some of you must have had it too.

Though Bates tells us to relax, I don't think he means not to use our eyes. When I look with the bad eye, my brain naturally looks with the eye that's covered. But if I consciously shift my attention *without effort* to the other eye, I start to see the grey lines and letter forms. It's strange to watch them winking in and out of existence, and it may even be connected to the swirls of yellow clouds that I always have going across my vision. Perhaps the strain is doing that.

I wouldn't suggest wearing a patch outside though. Doing it last week I had to be extra careful crossing the road. I was looking through my covered eye at nothing and wouldn't have been able to see cars.

I also noticed differences in colour with both eyes; probably because the fovea isn't responding to the light properly.

It's disappointing I'm not seeing the results Bates relates in his book. But I'm patient and persistent and feel it's coming, slowly but surely.

We are indeed learning to see again!
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#13
Here is another way to think about what's happening, which I just puzzled together this morning:
1. Our myopic eyeballs are slightly bulged in front.
2. The bulge is slightly different for each eyeball.
3. In order to use our eyes we need light.
4. When using our eyes, every location we are in has slightly different lighting conditions. For instance in a well-lit room, we are surrounded by light, but there are stronger point sources from where the lamps are located. Outdoors the day can be sunny with a strong point source from the sun or it can be overcast with virtually no point source.
5. To see clearly the light has to fall onto the foveas, and we have to mentally pay attention to what those foveas are transmitting.
6. To see clearly continuously and binocularly without double images, each eye's fovea has to be receviing light from the same object/area at the same time.
7. Since our eyes are differently bulged or out-of-round we may have to position our heads at what seems like an odd angle to the point sources and within the overall lighting in order to get the light from a single object/area to fall onto our foveas at the same time.
8. Some amount of shifting will be required in order to find and maintain the optimal position.
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#14
U.S. Government will soon ban plain old incandescent light bulbs and force the public to use fluorescent bulbs. Fluorescent light bulbs contain toxic mercury, radiation... and produce very unnatural, unbalanced light that strains, confuses the eyes, brain/visual system, causes unclear vision and impaired eye health. Stock up on the incandescent bulbs and learn how to make your own now! Find full-spectrum non-fluorescent bulbs and open your windows-get real, natural full spectrum sunlight.
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