Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Do we have subconscious sight?
#1
In one of the Bates magazines, there was a nearsighted kid who could not distinguish a letter F on the chart. She palmed and held a memory from earlier that day in her head. When the nurse told her to imagine that the letter she couldn't see was curved, the kid lost the memory because F is not curved. When the nurse told her to imagine the letter had a flat top, the memory came back because F does have a flat top.

Do you think perhaps people with vision problems can actually see, subconsciously, just fine, but it's strain that makes things look blurry?

I plan to experiment with this-- once my mom gets out of this room Wink She doesn't have to know what I "waste time with".
Reply
#2
If we can see in dreams, we only need imagine correctly to see through are closed eyes into the day. Wink
Reply
#3
Yes, subconscious is the most powerful tool of our brain, changes are made there, if you think positively, you will feel good, then everything will be fine, so smile and be happy and your vision will improve a lot.

use the below affirmations:

"I can see better every day!"
"My vision is improving!"
"I can see clearly, confortably, and naturally!"
"The form and structure of my eyes are getting better!"

Don't trust me? Try it for your self, repeat these affirmations every day, every hour. every time you remember it, until it grab on your subconscious. It's for everyone!

Best Regards! ;D
Reply
#4
Self Affirmations? That's the easy way out my friend. I like to be challenged.
Reply
#5
Summon-Pretty-Peace Wrote:Do you think perhaps people with vision problems can actually see, subconsciously, just fine, but it's strain that makes things look blurry?
Amen. In fact, vision is a subconscious process but when we try to override control over the eyes we disturb its functioning.
Also, this is evident in other parts of the body - a person is more likely to break bones when falling from great heights while he is conscious than while he is unconscious.
Reply
#6
Bates believed it had to do with people having flashes of clear vision caused by their eyes focusing for an instant that was short enough for the person not to have noticed. It can be a matter of how people don't notice things when they're consciously looking, such as for some portion of a blink, or when paying attention to something else other than what they see, because they've gotten an association built up in their system where they don't "see" unless they're straining their eyes, because that's what they think is necessary, sort of like how a pile driver doesn't work unless you grip it hard and take control over it.

Dave
Site Administrator

"Half of our funny, heathen lives, we are bent double to gather things we have tossed away." - George Meredith
Reply
#7
David, that's totally correct on my case.

IndigoGhost Wrote:If we can see in dreams, we only need imagine correctly to see through are closed eyes into the day. Wink
As i said before its your personal mind-television, but you can see anything you like as it dosen;t happen on the real television.
Ever heard about lucid dreamers?
Reply
#8
David Wrote:because they've gotten an association built up in their system where they don't "see" unless they're straining their eyes, because that's what they think is necessary
I see. Just today I was struggling to read a Powerpoint presentation, and while I kept telling myself to relax my eyes, they kept wanting to strain and the letters got worse. The association between hard work and success is so strong for me that trying to relax felt like trying not to blink when something is being thrown at me.

Ares Wrote:As i said before its your personal mind-television, but you can see anything you like as it dosen;t happen on the real television.
Ever heard about lucid dreamers?

I like that mind-television metaphor. It's amazing how entertaining mere visualization can be!
And yes, a good friend of mine is a natural lucid dreamer. She's myopic though and has said she doesn't believe in Bates.
Reply
#9
Well. I'm a lucid dreamer, and often also I have OBE experiences, (Out of Body Experience), I'm conscious of it. (We all do it every night but unconscious). It's a great experience where you experiment the sensations between your inner self with the astral plane or the "realm of the deads". just do it. be careful, you need a bit of preparation. learn how to relax properly and you're there. Here is the key for the life. in your mind. and remmember, we are an ETERNAL being, a spirit with body. Wink
Reply
#10
Ares Wrote:Ever heard about lucid dreamers?
I am one Smile
Reply
#11
I did search on the subject, and it seems that Lucid dreaming can be beneficial.

First, you are falling at REM condition immediately. That's the actual sleep. When we have "subconscious sleep" something that happens when we sleep without any dream, the mind can't rest, and we will eventually kill it if we try to sleep that way for long.
Wikipedia says "REM sleep in adult humans typically occupies 20–25% of total sleep, about 90–120 minutes of a night's sleep."
So, if we lucid dream, we can see what we want for even three hours, and get more REM. That has to be the explanation how some people sleep only one hour each day.

Anyway, while lucid dreaming, since we have consciousness, we might be able to show something to the mind, like perfect vision, if we notice the perfect vision in dreams. And maybe we can use this to do other stuff as well.

I felt sometimes in that condition. One time using only sheer will, without the sleep paralysis stuff, and i had great awareness of what i saw. I was causing stuff actually. But i have gotten with me my crappy imagination and memory, and totally messed the dream up... Big Grin

So, do the other thing. Check your sight regularly the day, and you may be able to check it while dreaming and notice perfect vision. Wink
Reply
#12
Ares Wrote:I did search on the subject, and it seems that Lucid dreaming can be beneficial.
First, you are falling at REM condition immediately. That's the actual sleep. When we have "subconscious sleep" something that happens when we sleep without any dream, the mind can't rest, and we will eventually kill it if we try to sleep that way for long.
Wikipedia says "REM sleep in adult humans typically occupies 20–25% of total sleep, about 90–120 minutes of a night's sleep."
So, if we lucid dream, we can see what we want for even three hours, and get more REM. That has to be the explanation how some people sleep only one hour each day.
Anyway, while lucid dreaming, since we have consciousness, we might be able to show something to the mind, like perfect vision, if we notice the perfect vision in dreams. And maybe we can use this to do other stuff as well.
I felt sometimes in that condition. One time using only sheer will, without the sleep paralysis stuff, and i had great awareness of what i saw. I was causing stuff actually. But i have gotten with me my crappy imagination and memory, and totally messed the dream up... Big Grin
So, do the other thing. Check your sight regularly the day, and you may be able to check it while dreaming and notice perfect vision. Wink
Illusions. I was driving home from work yesterday, shifting back and forth from left eye to right eye, experiencing clear flashes, and trying to analyze what was going on. And I realized that there was a milliseconds time-delay between the two eyes. And that fact fits with my theory of the negative and latent side-effects of neonatal eye antibiotics because there is a multi-seconds difference in their instillation which results in a multi-seconds difference in when the 20/400 blur effect wears off for each eye!
Reply
#13
Seeing is also reaction-time. Your reaction time might be so slow that once you take a look at an object, it's already cloudy when you have registered it. So you have to be in a constant state of alertness, it helps to not judge what is being seen and just treat it as it is.

I found through videogames, that might improve reaction time, my reflexes, were only on guard during the game and in everyday life I let it slide a litte bit.
Reply
#14
Mzero Wrote:Seeing is also reaction-time. Your reaction time might be so slow that once you take a look at an object, it's already cloudy when you have registered it. So you have to be in a constant state of alertness, it helps to not judge what is being seen and just treat it as it is. I found through videogames, that might improve reaction time, my reflexes, were only on guard during the game and in everyday life I let it slide a litte bit.
Agreed! And when the reaction-time is different in each eye, there is a milliseconds time delay in the attenuation shift from one eye to the other, making binocular and stereoscopic vision more difficult. And if you unconsciously prefer blur or at least believe the blur is normal or okay, then that is another hurdle-multiple to overcome. It is mind-numbingly difficult, BUT - having discovered all these pieces of the puzzle, once I began piecing this visual-system jigsaw together, the clear vision of both the underlying unconscious blur and the visual-alignment overlay blur, has been coming on better and better with more and more control over it. My prediction of nine more months until I achieve fully controlled clear distance and nearpoint vision seems still on track. Knock on wood. Ignore the illusions.
Reply

TEST YOUR VISION AT HOME!
- Free Eye Chart PDFs

  • 20 ft, 10 ft, and Near Vision Charts
  • Letters Calibrated to Correct Printed Size
Download Now