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article rewrite - Applying the Bates Method
#1
<!-- m --><a class="postlink" href="http://www.iblindness.org/intro/method-part1.html">http://www.iblindness.org/intro/method-part1.html</a><!-- m -->

- It was born from the previous article and I changed the title obviously... just messing around with titles, not sure what I want to call it.
- I split it into two. The first part deals with preparation and relaxation exercises, which in my view are mainly to prepare a person for the work in part two.
- Added more detailed instructions for shifting attention and seeing the previous point worse, mostly rewriting the whole thing about looking for details and changing it into this. Is any of this unclear?
- Added applicable quotes by Bates.
- Separated the idea of strain into four distinct types. Robert at effortlessvision.com is the only person I know of that makes the distinction between primary and secondary strain, and I think the secondary strain needs to be further separated like this.
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"Half of our funny, heathen lives, we are bent double to gather things we have tossed away." - George Meredith
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#2
Also, the whole thing with looking back and forth at two points, or two letters, is pretty intense and hard to keep doing correctly. With two letters, E and O, you look at the E and see the O worse, then look at the O and see the E worse, implying that you should also have been looking at the E a moment ago while noticing that the O was worse. It's difficult to do quickly. I don't know if that's unavoidable. It's the way Bates described it, but what if you instead focused on working with one letter or spot only, and keep looking short distances to the side of it, and back to it, to notice how short of a distance you can look away to see it worse.

The point of all this, if it isn't apparent, is people with blurry vision have suppressed their central vision, so that they can look somewhat away from a point and see it the same, or even better, than when they look directly at it. This process is part of activating the central vision again, by narrowing the attention to the smallest possible point and working on looking a shorter and shorter distance away from it in order to see it worse.
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"Half of our funny, heathen lives, we are bent double to gather things we have tossed away." - George Meredith
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#3
I was waiting for an update!

Well, I would like to comment something. And please don't take it bad. it's just a positive little critical. Wink
How you know, I'm working with looking for details process since you first published it some months ago until now, and the good news (great news!) is that in these last months i've made great progress more than ever since I started N.V.I journey, as you said: luckily our brain/mind reacts very well when we do the right things. Smile
I have been a couple of months-maybe half of a year doing wrong things and being in a cycle of improved vision for a second then seeing a big blurry world in every moment of the day.

That cycle is what most people here do for years without stopping for a moment to think what's wrong... and then they give up the Method due their frustration. It's funny to see old and new Bates practitioners agaisnt you, rejecting your approach. but believe me, they just don't want to accept this due of his pride to new opinions, later when some of us got cured through this process they will start to doubt and then will give it a try.

I like where this is going, I like very much as you are presenting it, simple and with a solid base of knowledge. Since you published it for first time- I think now I've got perfectly what you mean. But my little critical is, personally I think the process was best presented in your past article, was a bit better-simple to understand than now, remember it's just my opinion, anyway it's easy to understand, but is a bit more confusing than before, I don't know why-but that's what I think. Maybe you can add some lines you've wrote before (in your past article) and it should be perfect (?).

I'm looking forward to post my entire experience-feedback with this process in the next weeks.

I encourage each member of this community to try it.
Thank you very much David for make this possible!.
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#4
I want be more specific:

After trying exactly what you say in this update: I've find It's all about shifting, and the way you describe it now is very similar to what Bates wrote.
Now it sounds like a 'hard' work to do, in this way we're quite conscious of the shifts and therefore produces strain... for lazy people like me is not so good, I got bored after some time.
Before the way you described the process seemed easy and fun and we was not conscious the shifting even we was shifting short distances.

I will continue doing the process in the way this was described before. I wonder if there is any problem doing it in the way was described before the update(?). We was missing something(?)
That's the point. Thank you!
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#5
I really love the new page - its great. I am definitely falling into the A, B and D Categories. I don't like to think I am that much of a stressy person, so I am hesitant about group C, but to check I was definitely B I dug my glasses out that I was given 3 years ago. Strangely, where my left eye seems to have gotten much worse, my right eye has remained pretty much the same - I knew it was 20/100 now and 20/70 ish to begin, so that means I have 20/30 with the glasses on - its really nice an sharp Smile The left eye on the other hand, well, lets just move on - thats gotten a lot worse.

Im interested in why my right eye hasn't decreased by as much though - any ideas?!?

Anyway, B is definitely me is what I was trying to say Smile

James Smile
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#6
lordofthesun Wrote:I want be more specific:

After trying exactly what you say in this update: I've find It's all about shifting, and the way you describe it now is very similar to what Bates wrote.
Now it sounds like a 'hard' work to do, in this way we're quite conscious of the shifts and therefore produces strain... for lazy people like me is not so good, I got bored after some time.
Before the way you described the process seemed easy and fun and we was not conscious the shifting even we was shifting short distances.

I will continue doing the process in the way this was described before. I wonder if there is any problem doing it in the way was described before the update(?). We was missing something(?)
That's the point. Thank you!

The prior version didn't well address how long to hold a point, or what to do if things are so blurry that you can't find much to look at in a small area. People were reporting unfavorable results. This version addresses that insufficiency in instruction by changing the instructions more to Bates's own procedure in dealing with eccentric fixation.

It isn't practice in shifting the eyes so much as it is practice in shifting the attention. Being conscious of shifting at first is not going to be comfortable, but I fear that people lump in all uncomfortable things as "strain". A feeling of tension doesn't necessarily mean you're doing the wrong thing. This discomfort is a hill that has to be gotten over. It also may not feel good to pull yourself out of bed in the morning, but it has to be done, and it isn't so bad after you're up for a while. Noticing how it feels is good, but it has to be put into context as far as whether doing what you're doing makes sense. Boredom might not be boredom but anxiety at doing something that is challenging.
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"Half of our funny, heathen lives, we are bent double to gather things we have tossed away." - George Meredith
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#7
Is it clear enough that there is a Part Two? I only have the single link at the bottom of the Part One page, in order to funnel people through the pages in the right order.
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"Half of our funny, heathen lives, we are bent double to gather things we have tossed away." - George Meredith
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#8
I think if you put a link at the top of the page as well that would be great - i didn't see.it last night, but I've.just read it - it is amazing, is your surname Bates? it is the best explaination I have.read - it puts everything into sufficient details but not too many. It leaves.you being able to practice straight away and covers some things that should happen. Well done and thank you Smile
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#9
I think the article is well done and makes me more understand in the Bates' method in the way of step-by-step.

I have some more questions that not clearly understand :
- what means 1/2 inch of the area at twenty feet?
- in the article, there are relaxing exercises part and the real practicing part which only is central-fixation, which I have to do both of these parts, right?
- while I practice shifting by using the eyechart, will I have to sit at the 20 feet away, or just sit at any distances the letter could be seen?
And will I have to approximately identify what the letter is, OR just known that there is a letter right there, but can't identify what is that letter?
- how could I compare the difference of the small point of each letter, while all the letters I was looking at are the same blur?

Thank you for your lighting up my mind!
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#10
BrightStar Wrote:I think the article is well done and makes me more understand in the Bates' method in the way of step-by-step.

I have some more questions that not clearly understand :
- what means 1/2 inch of the area at twenty feet?
- in the article, there are relaxing exercises part and the real practicing part which only is central-fixation, which I have to do both of these parts, right?
- while I practice shifting by using the eyechart, will I have to sit at the 20 feet away, or just sit at any distances the letter could be seen?
And will I have to approximately identify what the letter is, OR just known that there is a letter right there, but can't identify what is that letter?
- how could I compare the difference of the small point of each letter, while all the letters I was looking at are the same blur?

Thank you for your lighting up my mind!

Answers in order:
- Standing at twenty feet away, an area 1/2 inch wide. The farther you are, or the smaller the object, the smaller is the area you're narrowing your attention to.
- The relaxation exercises are meant to prepare you for central fixation. It's more likely to be successful.
- Any distance from the chart is fine.
- Sit closer. Look away from a letter a short or long distance until you find that you can't see the letter as well as when you looked directly at it. If you can see two points equally as well even as you look away from each to the other, you need to start by looking farther away. In an extreme case you can start by looking back and forth at two strong lights, several feet apart, until you can see that you see the light you're looking at best.
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"Half of our funny, heathen lives, we are bent double to gather things we have tossed away." - George Meredith
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#11
David,

GREAT job!! It's easy to follow, straightforward, well-guided and thorough without being complex. Reading this rewrite has cleared some things up for me (and I thought I already understood the method) - it's going to be my 'go-to' page from now on when I do my Bates work everyday. I especially like the Bates quotes for the newbies. I know you are still working on it so I don't want to annoy you by pointing out typos which you are probably already in the process of editing - but the first page has a few typos :-\

Love it! Great work! Thank you thank you thank you for all your efforts to help us see better! Smile
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#12
Well, It seems this community is on the very right track, which I like very much!

Now I can see the link to part two more noticeable. I have low-mild myopia right now, people with high degrees have some difficulties to find something even when it's simple like that...

And yes seetheleaves that's what I used to do regularly.

I will start to experiment with what you say now, thanks for the clarification Dave.
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#13
seetheleaves Wrote:David,

GREAT job!! It's easy to follow, straightforward, well-guided and thorough without being complex. Reading this rewrite has cleared some things up for me (and I thought I already understood the method) - it's going to be my 'go-to' page from now on when I do my Bates work everyday. I especially like the Bates quotes for the newbies. I know you are still working on it so I don't want to annoy you by pointing out typos which you are probably already in the process of editing - but the first page has a few typos :-\

Love it! Great work! Thank you thank you thank you for all your efforts to help us see better! Smile

Go ahead and list any typos. I found a few.
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"Half of our funny, heathen lives, we are bent double to gather things we have tossed away." - George Meredith
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#14
I just spent a little time with the chart following the instructions to see the previous point worse and got myself all tangled up. First, I found myself focusing more attention on the previous point and how it looked (to see if it was worse) than on what was in the center of my vision, and felt that dual-focus eccentric fixation headache starting, so stopped. I started again, and then didn't know whether I was supposed to remember the previous point and how it looked, or actually see it now in the periphery, and again felt like my attention was on multiple items at once and got uncomfortable, so stopped. OK, too much thinking! I understand the concept, but what seems to work for me is to look at or see a smaller and smaller area of focus (like part of a letter), while noticing that everything else is less clear. Maybe the difference is just between how I'm interpreting the words "see" and "notice". I just wanted to pass this along, for what it's worth. I often take things very literally and have to follow instructions meticulously to not miss anything, and also have to do things wrong a few times before I finally get them right, so please don't take this as a criticism of what you wrote, David. I think it's very clear and helpful.
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#15
Nancy Wrote:I just spent a little time with the chart following the instructions to see the previous point worse and got myself all tangled up. First, I found myself focusing more attention on the previous point and how it looked (to see if it was worse) than on what was in the center of my vision, and felt that dual-focus eccentric fixation headache starting, so stopped. I started again, and then didn't know whether I was supposed to remember the previous point and how it looked, or actually see it now in the periphery, and again felt like my attention was on multiple items at once and got uncomfortable, so stopped. OK, too much thinking! I understand the concept, but what seems to work for me is to look at or see a smaller and smaller area of focus (like part of a letter), while noticing that everything else is less clear. Maybe the difference is just between how I'm interpreting the words "see" and "notice". I just wanted to pass this along, for what it's worth. I often take things very literally and have to follow instructions meticulously to not miss anything, and also have to do things wrong a few times before I finally get them right, so please don't take this as a criticism of what you wrote, David. I think it's very clear and helpful.

I hear you, and after considering this some more I think that there's a better way of doing this than shifting back and forth between two points. It takes up too much time to remind yourself what you're looking away from and whether you see it worse and what you're looking at now. The few seconds between shifts that takes is a pretty long time, and even without verbalizing it, it's difficult to speed up much while continuing to notice all that. It makes me curious what Bates had in mind there. It made more sense the other day.

So your way of looking at the smallest details obviously is working somewhat, and I agree that it's a good element. That's the main trick to get any of this to work, narrowing your attention to such a small area that it's obvious that you don't see it so well when you look at an equally small area some distance to the side of it. So once you narrow your attention to a small area, look to the side just for an instant, only long enough to notice that you can't see it as well, and then let your attention snap back to it, as it naturally will as you think of how well you see it. That way you don't have to pay attention to two objects and end up mixing yourself up. Then shorten the distance when you can.
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"Half of our funny, heathen lives, we are bent double to gather things we have tossed away." - George Meredith
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