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'Big eyes'
#1
Who among you doesn't have them?

If anyone is confused, I'm talking about the ratio of the iris to the white sclera. Is it correct to assume that most myopic people have big eyes and hyperopic people tend to have small eyes? If so, what would be considered 'normal' size of the iris?

I have big eyes. Sometimes when watching the television, I notice people looking down or up to have considerable more visible sclera than me.
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#2
T Wrote:Who among you doesn't have them? If anyone is confused, I'm talking about the ratio of the iris to the white sclera. Is it correct to assume that most myopic people have big eyes and hyperopic people tend to have small eyes? If so, what would be considered 'normal' size of the iris? I have big eyes. Sometimes when watching the television, I notice people looking down or up to have considerable more visible sclera than me.
It's an illusion. Our eyes are the same size as everyone else's - except we have the uncanny ability to 'bulge' the fronts of our eyes by unconsciously squeezing down on the eye areas with our lids, our eyebrows, and our cheeks. That closes everything up just enough to ensure we continue to see blur, which we unconsciously believe to be normal.
Try frequently stretching your eyes (ane even your mouth/jaw/cheeks) wide open, and then relaxing and looking W, E, N, S (and NE, SW, NW, SE) by pointing both eyes together in those directions simultaneously (Paul McCartney's 'yoga' for the eyes). Then hold your eyes wide open for as long as you can. Then relax and smile. Practice in front of a mirror. Try to see the highlight reflected above each pupil. Then do some Batesian Swinging and Palming. Try to teach your eyebrows to stay in a more raised position.
So-called scientists have been measuring eyeballs for centuries, and the only difference they've come up with is that many nearsighted people's eyes are 'longer' - but the increased length is always only at the fronts of the eyes. That fact is conveniently obfuscated. Wink Smile
Believe you me - if it wasn't an illusion, and so-called myopes had less sclera than normal, the scientists would have a field day and we'd all be encouraged to get some sort of new eye surgery. But wait a minute - isn't that exactly what is happening lately with lazy Lasik? Why, yes, indeed - to 'flatten' our corneas. But not because our eyeballs are too big. It's Diabolical.
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#3
I went to the mirror and you're right. It's most likely, because my lids are more 'closed'. Are you sure people with normal sight don't have this?
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#4
T Wrote:I went to the mirror and you're right. It's most likely, because my lids are more 'closed'. Are you sure people with normal sight don't have this?
Yes, I'm sure. I'm sure of just about everything I've posted. But many of the truths I've been discovering seem to have been hidden for at least a hundred years - they were not "self-evident".
I know what I post is true because I have used these truths to improve my eyesight. Meticulous observation. Trial and Error. Honest, dogged, unpreconceived investigation. Sometimes courage is required in the face of daunting opposition, self-doubts and shadows.
But each truth I've uncovered has seamlessly linked with the other truths, until the entire puzzle has become self-evident. To me. I've tried to explain it here on this fantastic website's community forum as each truth came to me, and as the entire theory unfolded. I've apparently been unsuccessful at enlightening anyone else.
Apparently most people want 'friendship' more than they want truth. I don't blame them. But friendship alone isn't going to solve the problem.
Here is my most recently uncovered truth: Pointing my face at a slightly oblique angle to the line of sight (maybe 10-20degrees East. then 10-20deg West) and then looking back down the center results in clearer eyesight - most probably because it helps realign the visual system components, specifically the maculae/foveal impulses of each eye aligned with the non-foveal (nasal side) impuses from the opposite eye. Those combined impulses are hard-wired in every normal human being.
That is the optic chiasm at work. The optic chiasm is created in the womb during gestation, and is necessary for distance vision. It can be disrupted at birth for various reasons, and distance eyesight can thereby be prevented from developing normally. Uncovering that fact and attending to it has resulted in improved control over my visual positioning, alignment, and eyesight.
Look at the photo of Dr. Bates and the photo David has posted of himself in a hat - both are pointed slightly obliquely to their line of sight. I have confirmed that in other photos of other NVI proponents.
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