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The right way to move
#1
The right way to move
http//blog.iblindness.org/2011-06/the-right-way-to-move/

First, a tip.

"Hot potato" is a game where everyone quickly tosses a ball around, and when the music stops the person holding the ball is eliminated. It suggests an analogy for a way to practice seeing. Every point you look at is a hot potato. The longer you stay on it, the more likely you will get burned. And the larger the point, the more likely you will get burned (big potatoes make for big burns, right?). So your best bet is to keep moving among the tiniest points as quickly as you can, never stopping long enough for your eyes to suffer abuse from getting burned by the potato. Anyway, it was just a thought, and you might try thinking of it in this way to see if it makes shifting easier.

Now some clarification on the principle of movement for vision improvement. It's an idea that's given a lot of importance by many writers about the Bates method. It's got to be put in the right context or it doesn't make any sense.

When you look for small details within that which you’re looking at and don’t feel like you’re moving your eyes, it isn’t a bad thing. You shouldn’t feel your eye movements or try to force eye movements with the idea that you’re preventing staring. In doing that you shift your eyes without shifting your attention and the important thing is really your attention. You can’t look at something right if you don’t pay attention to it. Consider the common sense test Do people with normal vision move their eyes just for the sake of moving them, because that’s the right thing to do? Of course not. They move their eyes only because that’s what happens when they direct their attention to another object or a different detail.

Now on the pattern of movement. If you watch a person with normal vision, his eyes don’t always dart around much to far apart objects. Much of the time his eyes appear to not be moving at all, because his shifts are so short as to be imperceptible. His process of looking at things is a matter of continuously looking for details and looking within those details to find further smaller details of interest.

If he is not searching a wide area or looking around, he looks at the details of one thing at a time. And even when he is looking over a wider area, he still keeps stopping for an instant on points, ie it's not a smooth movement. Don't be trying to learn a way to move your eyes to make the movement as smooth as possible. The eyes are made to move instantaneously to point themselves from one detail to the next. If you're making a slow, smooth movement, you aren't paying attention to what you're looking at. Make your attention your starting point. Make the decision of paying attention to tiny points in quick succession. Your eyes will follow.
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"Half of our funny, heathen lives, we are bent double to gather things we have tossed away." - George Meredith
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#2
This is a very good advice.

At first it sounded rather stressful to me - keep the eyes constantly 'hopping' from point to point.
But when I tried to do so, it was more relaxing than let the eyes come to a rest in one point and then slowly go to the next...
It seems that by moving more quickly the eyes just don't have enough time and opportunity to strain.
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#3
Nini Wrote:This is a very good advice. At first it sounded rather stressful to me - keep the eyes constantly 'hopping' from point to point.
But when I tried to do so, it was more relaxing than let the eyes come to a rest in one point and then slowly go to the next... It seems that by moving more quickly the eyes just don't have enough time and opportunity to strain.
Question: Are you also moving your face/head or swaying or making any other kind of movement while you keep the eyes moving?
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#4
I only moved my eyes.

But I think, that's the reason, why 'shoe polishing' or 'coffee grinding' helps the eyesight.
By quickly moving the arm, the whole body keeps shaking and produces small, rapid eye-movements.
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#5
You make a good observation there, that at first it seemed like it was going to be stressful having to constantly move your eyes, but it turned out to actually feel better. People don't realize the incredible amount of energy they are constantly expending into trying to keep their eyes locked in position and trying to see points for longer than an instant.
Site Administrator

"Half of our funny, heathen lives, we are bent double to gather things we have tossed away." - George Meredith
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#6
I think there is a close similarity between the eyesight and the sense of touch:
If you want to feel the stucture of a surface, you have to keep moving your fingers over it (and be receptive). Once you stop in one point, there is no more 'clear image' .
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#7
I was sat in the park and my vision was quite clear for brief periods. I noticed that I looked for more details, the detail around windows, details around cars, other little details I could notice, which seemed completely natural. One thing that seemed different during this, was that almost all my attention was on the details that I was looking at. However when the vision returned to being less clear, my attention went towards my thoughts(my usual habit) and away from what I could see.

So what I was wondering was is it natural for the attention to be on what we are seeing, or is it fine for us to not pay much attention to what we see, and still see well???
When I did see more clearly it seemed so much more of my focus was on what i was seeing, and there was much less room for focusing on my thoughts.
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#8
So,the best shifts are when are done very close..and i was always moving from object to object thinking that was shifting point to point...i learn with the mistakes,right?
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#9
footballman Wrote:I was sat in the park and my vision was quite clear for brief periods. I noticed that I looked for more details, the detail around windows, details around cars, other little details I could notice, which seemed completely natural. One thing that seemed different during this, was that almost all my attention was on the details that I was looking at. However when the vision returned to being less clear, my attention went towards my thoughts(my usual habit) and away from what I could see. So what I was wondering was is it natural for the attention to be on what we are seeing, or is it fine for us to not pay much attention to what we see, and still see well??? When I did see more clearly it seemed so much more of my focus was on what i was seeing, and there was much less room for focusing on my thoughts.
All the blur means now is that your mind is thinking or preoccupied and not 'locking on' or 'snapping to' the foveas - doing so might undermine your train of thought.
Perhaps the future is one where we will see blur when we are thinking, and clear when we are looking. Hopefully it would just be another phase to pass through, because without simultaneously clear thinking and looking, how can we learn anything much new about the real world?
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#10
I find it helpful to imagine, that my eyes are a sort of a laser pointer which is scanning the conturs of small details or - when I look at the eye chart - I imagine the letters as having a relief surface, which I can 'feel' with my eyes (like with my finger tips).
I pass my eyes (like a laser pointer or my finger tips) along the blurry lines of the letters till they become clearer.
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#11
Nini Wrote:I think there is a close similarity between the eyesight and the sense of touch:
If you want to feel the stucture of a surface, you have to keep moving your fingers over it (and be receptive). Once you stop in one point, there is no more 'clear image' .

This is a fantastic observation. So we are 'feeling with our eyes' - this is a great way to put it!
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#12
Here is a nice exercise to train saccadic movements:

<!-- m --><a class="postlink" href="http://www.eyecanlearn.com/butterfly%20fast%20pursuits.htm">http://www.eyecanlearn.com/butterfly%20 ... rsuits.htm</a><!-- m -->

(from this site, there are sore more of it: <!-- m --><a class="postlink" href="http://www.eyecanlearn.com/">http://www.eyecanlearn.com/</a><!-- m --> )

I like the butterfly exercise most, because you can imagine, that your eyes are light and moving as effortlessly as a butterfly.
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#13
Nini - maybe you meant smooth pursuit eye movement; saccadic movements are a different classification of eye movement than smooth pursuit, which is for tracking moving objects - as in tracking the moving butterfly -
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#14
I think you are right, I didn't pay much attetion to the classification; I was looking for an exercise to increase the natural eye movements.
An interesting observation:
When I put my laptop with the next exercise ( <!-- m --><a class="postlink" href="http://www.eyecanlearn.com/bouncing_ball.htm">http://www.eyecanlearn.com/bouncing_ball.htm</a><!-- m --> ) on the table while watching TV , my eyes were drawn by the moving ball in my field of vision, so that they moved more than usual.
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#15
Thanks for sharing this.Smile
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