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blinking,clear flashes and eye tension
#1
hello,
I noticed something that I'd like to share.I have read in many books that blinking should be light, as light as possible, like the wings of a butterfly.Today I tried this.When I blink lightly, I experience a clear flash or I see better.It's good,but it brings a big discomfort.I feel pain and burning in the eyes, they become red and begin to water.
Has anyone felt this and how can I keep seeing more clearly while blinking lightly and at the same time to ease this unpleasant feeling?
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#2
Hi Kalina,

Don't shortchange your blinks. You may want to think bigger, softer, SLOWER blinks. Give the eyelids and tear glands time to adequately moisten and oxygenate the eyes. As often as you can, when blinking, keep your eyes gently closed for even a second or two, or longer, before opening them. Yawning frequently is also good to help moisten our moisture and oxygen starved corneas. Pain, burning, redness, scratchiness, tearing, etc. is often symptomatic of a dry-eyed condition.
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#3
hi Arocarty,
thank you very much for your reply.I closed my eyes for one or two seconds when I felt tension in my eyes and also tried to blink sftly and slowly. This really gave me relief of the pain.And when I open my eyes after closing them, my eyesight improves for a while.But it will take some time until I learn to blink correctly.
thanks a lot again
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#4
Hi Kalina,

That's really good to hear. Yes, blinking can take a long time to restore, and we certainly don't want to get into more bad habits which we'll need to break. I really struggled with how to blink, because I got into a bad habit of suppressing blinks when I got clear flashes, in order to savor, extend, and maintain them. They always vanished as soon as I blinked. I knew that was not the way, but couldn't help myself at the time. It often caused a lot of those dry-eye symptoms.

One day I was in a relaxed conversation with someone, standing a few feet away, and suddenly found myself blinking in a way that felt so different. I would describe it as lazy, slow, soft, complete, full blinks. It felt so restful and correct. I started observing people w/ normal sight, and how they blink, and one of the things that stood out to me was how they often close their eyes with a similar long, complete, slow blink. Sometimes they were closed for even a couple seconds or more. They'll often close them just before a shift in where they're looking. It's just another one of those things that they practice unconsciously all day in order to maintain normal sight. When you get better at it and as it becomes more automatic, you'll find it helps reduce tension in the eyes and face, and those clear flashes get easier to maintain.

Good luck,
Andrew
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#5
hi again,Arocarty,
You are absolutely right about closing the eyes for a few seconds and reopening them.It seems to be a powerful instrument for restoring eyesight.The difficulty comes when it should become an automatic process.I do that and try to blink correctly only when I think about my own eyes.When I work, think about something or talk to someone I often forget about the good vision habbits and respectively, the improvements disappear.
By the way, in one book, it's written about that.The book is "The Paul's pathway to normal vision" by Paul Anderson.It's based on the Bates' method.Vision recovery there is presented as a 3-stage process.The second stage is closing the eyes and opening them as lightly and effortlessly as we can.It is said in the book that this removes eye tension.I found this procedure extremely useful - it helped me reduce my diopters from - 4.0 left/-3.75 right to - 3.25 left/-2.75 right for six months. The third stage is looking without strain, with light blinks.But when I tried to blink lightly, the symptoms of the dry eye appeared.So,I think closing of the eyes is essential and should be done as often as we can, at least in beginning.
I'll let you know if this works-if there is another decrease in the diopters, I hope in a few months.
All the best,
Kalina
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#6
Hi Kalina,

I think that may be wise to just not worry about the feathery blinks right now, especially since it appears to be causing you issues. Those light, automatic blinks will come as you are able to eliminate more strain and tension. Sometimes it's better to focus on eliminating the stain and tension first in other ways that suite YOU, and things like central fixation, seeing the swing, seeing black, will automatically fall into place, nothing else required. They can't be forced. I think that's one of the problems with all these 'systems,' that try to take you from step (or 'stage') 1, to 2, 3. 4. 5, 6....etc. - one size shoe does not fit all, ESPECIALLY when it comes to eyesight. People get caught up in them trying to MAKE themselves fit into it, and end up infusing effort into many things they do. Bates had an arsenal of techniques, but even his ingenuity was taxed to the limit in finding something that clicked with some, and for some nothing seemed to work. Treatment had to constantly be tailored to the individual. The diopters will also take care of themself, and since those numbers can fluctuate as wildly as our tension and strain can, they're not always a good testament to our overall acuity or refraction. It's good to track your own chart readings, when we're not all nervous and anxious as we often get when anticipating and going into the 'testing' environment of an optometrist, or eye doctor.
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#7
Hi Arocarty,
Of course vision at every moment depends on relaxation of the mind and body.Today I had a clear flash that lasted about ten minutes.It happens for third or fourth time, the feeling is wonderfull.During this clear flash my blinks were light, i didn't think at all about them,my eyelids blinked independently of my will.Exactly as you said.And there was no pain, no tears, no burning.....I still don't know how to control the relaxation in order to prolong this state.I don't know how to make it happen, too. It happens spontaneously, when I don't expect it.Maybe you have an idea how, because you are more experienced than meSmile
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#8
I want to suggest that the butterfly blinks are correct, and that the "bad" feedback you're getting from your body in the form of burning or stinging isn't necessarily a bad thing. One thing you know is that it's something different. But don't assume that it means you're doing something wrong and that the feeling is going to last forever. People with normal vision might close their eyes for a longer moment, but not often, so don't get in the habit of closing your eyes to escape the situation. Just keep blinking like you were doing and see what happens.

To understand it, the best thing to do is compare it to what's real.

So say you're running on the treadmill watching TV, and you're getting tired. Your side is hurting and your muscles are aching. As you watch TV, you become immersed in it for a moment, thinking about what's happening in the TV scene. I think of this as partially leaving your physical body, going more into your mind, and that's the reason you don't feel the pain so much. You don't have to think of it in this way exactly. But also look at how you find that you are completely unaware of a page in a book you apparently just read, because you were thinking of something else, or that while walking on the street you have very little memory of what you walked by in the last few minutes during a cell phone conversation. Back to the running example, when your attention snaps back to your body, you suddenly feel the pain again.

And the more you pay attention to your body, the more of it you can feel. As an example, just now I remembered as an example having in the past felt the pressure of blood pumping through my hands, and other areas, so just to make a point and make sure what I'm saying is true in this moment, I lied down on the floor until I could feel it. Sure enough, with just a couple minutes' attention, I felt the rhythmic pumping of blood into and out of my hands. But mainly just my hands. I wasn't paying any attention to my legs and didn't feel it there. To me the implications of things like this are interesting, but my point here was to just point out that you can gain physical awareness of things that you were completely oblivious to before.
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#9
Hi Kalina,



Hey, that's great, even spontaneous clear flashes are good - take it as a good sign that you are making a positive impact on your visual system, and it's trying to correct itself, however brief. You ask a couple excellent questions, - how to make it happen, and how to prolong the state of relaxation. I would prefer to rephrase that a little to ask, how do I obtain relief from chronic tension and strain? Because when you find what brings relief for you, you'll also find that is exactly when vision responds very favorably. That's just the indirect nature of this. It seemed like you said that you had found something that provided you a certain amount of relief and clear flashes - by blinking, and/or closing your eyes for shorter or longer durations. What's going to work for you is only something that you can discover, and I can only encourage you to keep working with that, as well as exploring other Bates techniques. It can take time to learn how to do things correctly, and realize a benefit. You might have to get away from certain things when they aren't beneficial, and come back to them later with a fresh approach. And keep asking questions, you never know when somebody else has an insight that you can take advantage of.

How does one prolong flashes? Again, I would prefer to rephrase that a little to ask, how do I stop the habitual
things I do that keep fueling and allowing tension and strain to reassert itself? We have developed many bad habits over the years, many of which we are not even aware. As soon as we get a glimpse of clear vision, we almost immediately revert back to those habits, and we may even add a few new ones for good measure! (like suppressing our blinking to prolong it, testing our vision, concentrating too hard on things seen, stop shifting). Sometimes it can seem impossible to overcome, but it's not, if you can become better aware of what you do and find ways to counteract it and stop it. When you find something that works, stick with it, build upon it. Myopes have to frequently go back to the well, because strain and tension can so quickly reassert themself, and it doesn't do much good to just keep on constantly straining.

On a more practical note, during a clear flash I would say, be calm, be casual, be cool. Always keep shifting, in a relaxed manner, noticing detail, but not trying to force it to come out or testing how much you can see. Cultivating the memory of a small letter or object, or the memory of another location can be very helpful in counteracting the tendency to strain while looking at things. Something simple, easy, familiar that means something positive to you. For example, I like the first letter in my name, "A", and find it very helpful to remember and picture in my mind the very top of it, as a sharp black point, getting sharper and sharper. Anything that can provide a strong, fond, visual memory can be a powerful deterrent that counteracts whatever influences that want to spoil good vision. For more on that, I would recommend you read what Bates wrote about memory, and imagination.

Regards,

Andrew
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#10
kalina Wrote:hello, I noticed something that I'd like to share.I have read in many books that blinking should be light, as light as possible, like the wings of a butterfly.Today I tried this.When I blink lightly, I experience a clear flash or I see better.It's good,but it brings a big discomfort.I feel pain and burning in the eyes, they become red and begin to water.
Has anyone felt this and how can I keep seeing more clearly while blinking lightly and at the same time to ease this unpleasant feeling?
I think this is a clear-cut-and-dried ( Wink ) case of temporarily repairing the tearfilm in one or both eyes (which is it?) which immediately focuses the incoming light onto the unused foveas resulting in a flash of clear vision but also an instant over-stimulation of the visual system (the eyes are probably not yet aligned or synchronized, or of equal blur or dominance, resulting in even greater disparity in the two images), probably accompanied by breath-holding or staring in a misguided attempt to maintain the flash, which quickly dries and irritates the corneas, again deteriorating the tearfilms. Voila - back to the blurry vision which requires nothing and has been hypnotically accepted as okay.
arocarty Wrote:Hi Kalina, Don't shortchange your blinks. You may want to think bigger, softer, SLOWER blinks. Give the eyelids and tear glands time to adequately moisten and oxygenate the eyes. As often as you can, when blinking, keep your eyes gently closed for even a second or two, or longer, before opening them. Yawning frequently is also good to help moisten our moisture and oxygen starved corneas. Pain, burning, redness, scratchiness, tearing, etc. is often symptomatic of a dry-eyed condition.
Excellent suggestions!
Another: Immediately splash and cup/flood cold water into your eyes (reinforces the clear flash by slightly shrinking the corneas as well as lubricating them), and onto your face & head (relieves stress). Or use water-based eyedrops. Or even your own spit ( Tongue )! (The consistency of clean spit/saliva is probably closer to actual tears or the tearfilm than plain water.)
Goals: To train your eyes to remember what it is like to have a normal tearfilm; to begin to accept the resulting clear flash as normal (and thus reject the blur); and to learn how to relax and allow the rebuilt tearfilm to stay in place for longer and longer periods, eventually becoming a natural, normal habit.
For instance, opthalmologists claim the myopic ('closed eye') eyeball is 'elongated' - but the elongation is only at the fronts, bulging along the corneal axis (the rear of the eye isn't elongated else far worse than myopia would occur). I believe, and I think Dr. Bates would agree, that the bulge is caused by abnormal unconscious stress on the eye from the surrounding muscles, including the eyelids, brows and cheeks.
What if we could train our eyes to relax, stay open, and gradually replace that corneal bulge with a (normal) tearfilm? It's been working for me.
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#11
Hi, JMartinC4,
Thanks a lot for the reply. Your explanation is really logical.Recently I ignored these unpleasant symptoms as tears, pain, and burning and blinked as lightly as I can.I often feel the tearfilm moistening my eyes while I blink lightly, the vision is improved and there 's no discomfort.The tearfilm maybe plays the role of a contact lens and focuses the light into the foveas. It happens to both eyes. You are right, the blur is not equal in the separate eyes. My right eye sees better and it's also dominant.I don't know why in the moments of blurry vision I see double or even multiple images (one of them is clear).My breathing is a problem, too.I unconsciously sometimes hold it and often need to yawn.
I have tried splashing the eyes with cold water. It immediately brings a clear flash and refreshens the eyes.I can do it in the morning and evening.But I think the most important is to develop the the good vision habbits-blinking, breathing, eye movements,central fixation, relaxation. Especially relaxation.I remember having a clear flash recently which lasted long, between ten and fifteen minutes.The most interesting was the relaxed state I was in.I can't connect it to a particular thought or experience, but I felt my legs, arms and the whole body so soft and relaxed that I didn't want to move, I was so lazy and passive I had never been before.I didn't do anything-no shifting, no looking at the smallest point, no breathing...Everything just happened.Now I try to elongate my clear flashes by relaxing the muscles of face and body and to repeat this state.I hope to eliminate this way the stress which leads to eye tension.
Thanks again for the good ideas.
Regards,
Kalina
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#12
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nIrKuQEJ6y4 - Human Eye and Central-Fixation, Shifitng for clear vision.
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#13
Hi, Clarknight,
Thank you for the video.I found it really useful. When I moved my eyes in the way described there,the eyesight clears to a sertain degree.But it's difficult to make it constant- I do it only consciously, when I think about my vision.
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#14
Hi, Clarknight,
Thank you for the video.I found it really useful. When I moved my eyes in the way described there,the eyesight clears to a sertain degree.But it's difficult to make it constant- I do it only consciously, when I think about my vision.
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#15
It will become automatic, 'on its own' with some practice. Relax deep when do it; dont get stiff trying hard to be perfect. Let the eyes do it without effort. Use the nosefeather.
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