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Strabismus
#1
I've had strabismus my entire life. As a child, my parents did the patching and the eye doctor told them that I would "grow out of the strabismus" with the help of the glasses. The glasses helped correct the strabismus for most of my childhood/early teenage years but became very noticeable when I was about 17. I became super self-concious and started searching for methods to help correct it or fix it all together. My doctor wanted me to get surgery at about 18 or 19, and I never followed thru with it. I can create the deviation in both of my eyes. When I focus with the less strong eye, it pulls my other eye inward and vice versa.

Now I'm 25. I've become the shy guy. I'm exploring the bates method as well as other natural vision improvement programs for about the last 2 weeks or so. I've been doing daily palming and sunning. I've also started using the nosecard (vision divider card) and I've started using the string beads (but not trying to strain or see it perfectly.

With the nosecard long swinging after palming and then the string beads, I've been able to start to fuse the proper "X" or "Y" with both eyes, which, as I understand, means that I'm waking up the lazier eye. This is really helping me a lot. I've been going for days without my glasses and I even go out into the real world without them.

I'm at -1 in my left eye and -3 in my right eye (my right eye is the lazier one that needs to wake up and be used more).

I'm also patching the stronger eye as well.

Do you guys have any tips for me, knowing what I'm doing on a daily basis? I've read a lot here and realize that the vision therapy is more about not trying to see or forcing myself to see something, but merely using my eyes in a relaxed and peaceful manor and I'm starting to see results.

Thanks!
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#2
Read all of this:
<!-- m --><a class="postlink" href="http://www.kelley-radix.org/downloads/new_techniques_of_vision_improvement.pdf">http://www.kelley-radix.org/downloads/n ... vement.pdf</a><!-- m -->
and all of the references in my signature below.
Then consider the effect on your psyche as well as on the unity of your visual system, of receiving at birth vision-blurring eye antibiotics first in one eye (which probably becomes your overly-dominant eye because the antibiotic effects wear off first) and some seconds later into the other eye (which becomes not only non-dominant but abnormally submissive). Then consider the fact that normal humans develop one eye slightly dominant so as to improve speed of reaction time and decision-making, and that the slightly dominant eye is naturally the slightly better visioned eye, or becomes so. But opticians routinely prescribe lenses which make both eyes equally visioned, and those who wear their lenses continuously as prescribed experience a reversal of normal better eye dominance and become worse eye dominant. They then experience continued worsening of overall eyesight until some lowest common denominator is reached.
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#3
Janet Goodrich 2 kids books. Tromboning swings.
Thomas Quackenbush book Relearning to See; bead string chapter; Phoria swings with the bead string and a light or other object coaxing the wandering, crossed eye onto the bead.

David has a article or post about this. He fixed his strabismus and other eye conditions.
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#4
Be clear what you want to improve. Are you trying to minimize the "turned eye" appearance? If so, then patching is a bad idea. It will break the fragile fusion you have and may make the turn worse. Same holds true if go without your glasses. With a 2D difference in refraction between the two eyes, your fusion will be very fragile without glasses and the eye turn may be enhanced.

Patching is used to improve the cortical response to the information from the bad eye and improves corrected acuity. Once corrected acuity is improved then other exercises like the beads on a string can be used to enhance fusion and lessen the eye turn. Since you can see the X with the string, you do have some fusion and patching will disrupt this.

I would suggest you return to your optometrist and ask for referral to an optometirst who specializes in binocular vision therapy. Building fusion and treating strabismus is a long and complex process and not a do it yourself project.
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#5
Judyb Wrote:Be clear what you want to improve. Are you trying to minimize the "turned eye" appearance? If so, then patching is a bad idea. It will break the fragile fusion you have and may make the turn worse. Same holds true if go without your glasses. With a 2D difference in refraction between the two eyes, your fusion will be very fragile without glasses and the eye turn may be enhanced.

Patching is used to improve the cortical response to the information from the bad eye and improves corrected acuity. Once corrected acuity is improved then other exercises like the beads on a string can be used to enhance fusion and lessen the eye turn. Since you can see the X with the string, you do have some fusion and patching will disrupt this.

I would suggest you return to your optometrist and ask for referral to an optometirst who specializes in binocular vision therapy. Building fusion and treating strabismus is a long and complex process and not a do it yourself project.

I live in a place where there isn't really the ability to find doctors who specialize in binocular vision therapy. They are more about surgery and no other option. I would be happy to attend a vision therapy center in my country but I have searched far and wide and I haven't been able to find anything. So you are saying that I won't be able to fix my strabismus myself and that I will need a optometrist for such thing? Hm.
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#6
clarknight Wrote:Janet Goodrich 2 kids books. Tromboning swings.
Thomas Quackenbush book Relearning to See; bead string chapter; Phoria swings with the bead string and a light or other object coaxing the wandering, crossed eye onto the bead.

David has a article or post about this. He fixed his strabismus and other eye conditions.

If you could help me locate David's post or article, I'd really appreciate it Smile Thanks!
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#7
Do the Cross crawl and other left and right brain hemishpere activities also.
Its true that over use of the eye patch can goof up the eyes. There must be a balance.
Using the patch on the clearer vision eye helps the less clear eye improve clarity, then the eyes move better; shifting, central fixation, relaxation is easier. When vision in the strab. eye is improved, it is easier to improve its movement. Then, no patch.
Thomas Quackenbush says; if use the patch, working with the strabismus eye on the bead string.., then, patch the strabismus eye and do regular shifting,... with the good eye. Then work with both eyes together.
Just search on here for Strabismus, David. He teaches that it is more about relaxation. Dont try to force the eyes to go straight. Relax the eye into correct movement, position.
I can give you a small booklet on Strabismus. I will write it up today; contact me at; <!-- e --><a href="mailto:mclearsight@aol.com">mclearsight@aol.com</a><!-- e --> and will e-mail it.
i will see if I have his article and post it here.

Clark
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#8
Here is David's Article;
Davids' cure;
From clark night on Fri Sept 26, 2008 10:12 am
To David, webmaster;

I read on your web site that you cured your condition of strabismus, astigmatism and blur.
Please list all the things you did that worked for you.
I am most interested in how you cured the strabismus.
I met a young person with a wandering eye problem and gave him info. on the Bates method.
His eye doctor wants to do surgery on the muscle and keeps giving him thick, very strong eyeglasses. I see much strain, inflammation in his eyes.
He is very smart, open minded and told me (before I gave him a vision improvement card) that he has been searching for a natural cure and refuses to let the eye doctor do the surgery. I know he can correct this condition.

I have cured astigmatism, blur and a very slight convergence problem in my eyes and other people, reduced cataracts in two ladies, intolerance to sunlight, but do not have experience treating major convergence, divergence (strabismus) impairment.
I can only advise methods on my web site and to read Better Eyesight Magazines, Stories from the clinic and Dr. Bates original book.
What do you think is the most effective method to get the eyes straight, moving together, looking at the same point?


Re: Davids' cure
by David on Mon Sept. 29, 2008 12:19 am.

It's really the same thing as blur, but different. With blur, it's a matter of realizing and stopping the effort you're habitually making to make your eyes focus.
With strabismus, he's probably habitually making an effort to team his eyes together, or to converge, or look both at the same thing, or keep his eyes straight, or how ever he thinks of it.
Other than that, for me it had to do with staring and one eye being blurrier, and then getting a bit more complicated by glasses with the two lenses of different strengths, so I'd end up using one eye at a time to avoid the instability.
The epiphany for me was lying down, palming and relaxing as completely as I could, opening my eyes and realizing that as I opened my eyes, before I had a chance to look at anything and adjust, my eyes were already straight until I did something to make them not.
If he could be convinced of that, that's the biggest obstacle.

Clark Night; I was thinking last night that, when the vision is blurry in a wandering eye, it might not see the perfect point of central fixation, the center of the visual field and this might impair convergence, divergence.
When the vision is clear in that eye, central fixation is perfect and the eye has a perfect central point to focus on with the other eye so it stays straight, normal, moving with the other eye from point to point.

More about strabismus - By David;

Some authorities say that the vision in a wandering eye (mine turned out laterally) is blocked out or creates a double image, but neither was ever true for me. The wandering eye provided no central vision, but it did provide a sort of peripheral vision, as evidenced by being able to sense more in the lateral direction than if I closed that eye.

But all the same things can be effective. As with anything, it's good to start each session with palming so as to start a little fresher.

Regards,
Dave
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#9
Hello,
My child got recently diagnosed with strabismus. I am terrified and still not able to find a satisfactory method for dealing with this. The ophthalmologist first suggested for us to play cathing balls with him arond 10 minutes per day for 3 months. After some time we didn't see any improvements, so I started doing some convergence exercises tracking and near far exercises. That seemed to worsen his problem, so we stopped the exercises. After the second visit to the doctor he told us to do alternate Patching for 2 hours before sleep and convergence exercises 10minutes per session twice a day. I have been doing this therapy, but somehow I am not comfortable with it and not sure if the problem is worsening. I am reading the quackenbush's book and goodrich's book and started looking into vision therapy specialist, but hoping for some therapy with results we can measure or see right away.

Please help!
we live in San Diego. Is there any good doctors that can help us close by?
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#10
(07-10-2011, 10:03 AM)Judyb Wrote: Be clear what you want to improve. Are you trying to minimize the "turned eye" appearance? If so, then patching is a bad idea. It will break the fragile fusion you have and may make the turn worse. Same holds true if go without your glasses. With a 2D difference in refraction between the two eyes, your fusion will be very fragile without glasses and the eye turn may be enhanced.

Patching is used to improve the cortical response to the information from the bad eye and improves corrected acuity. Once corrected acuity is improved then other exercises like the beads on a string can be used to enhance fusion and lessen the eye turn. Since you can see the X with the string, you do have some fusion and patching will disrupt this.

I would suggest you return to your optometrist and ask for referral to an optometirst who specializes in binocular vision therapy. Building fusion and treating strabismus is a long and complex process and not a do it yoproject.

This is by far the best advice given in this thread.
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#11
Hello,
thank you for your reply. But there has been some confusion.

We do the patching and convergence exercises based on our son's ophthalmologist.

I am also confused with what you mean by what we want to achieve. We want to fix both the appearance of the turned eye and the way the two eyes work together. Could there be anything else?

I started looking for optometrists that do Visual Therapy, but I am a little confused for which one to choose. Do you have any idea how I can make my decision regarding this? They all claim a good success rate and come with different price tags.

Yesterday I got the information of Natural Eyesight Teachers from T. Quackenbash that are located near San Diego and I am planning to contact them.

In the mean time we are doing "Tromboning" as described in Dr. Goodrich's book and alternate patching. I also slowly started introducing my son to the ideas of "Nose sketching", "palming" and general relaxing of the eyes.
Yesterday he told me that his eyes don't turn as much as before.

We have secretly noticed that the angle has improved a little bit. But I can't be sure. This is one thing that is bothering me, since there is no exact way to measure the frequency and angle.

There seem like so many options out there, but to choose the right one is very challenging.

Any suggestions?

Thanks!
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