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"Pulse" vision
#1
Hi everyone
After palming when I try to look at something (no matter where or on what distance) without any strain on my eyes, so when I dont want to see clear, I noticed that my vison in one second (or fraction of secon, that is simply a while) is worse than usually and then normal (for me of course, so as bad as usually). It's repeats very quickly and while this everything jumping and pulse so I have trouble to concentrate at details, I dont feel any pain in my eyes, and it's quite relaxing. I remember that once I have had a clear flash when i do this, but It's took me a long time to get it, almost30 minutes.
So It's good or bad symptom?
Best wishes from Poland!
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#2
I'm not sure from what you said, but the "pulse" could be the universal swing introducing itself. If so, this is a sign of healthy or improved vision, not a problem. I often experience this when looking at the eye chart, and do enjoy the relaxing effect of the slight bouncing of the letters, like the chart is breathing and alive.

You said
Quote:when I dont want to see clear, I noticed that my vision in one second (or fraction of secon, that is simply a while) is worse than usually
which is confusing to me. Why would you not want to see? And if you don't want to see, why should you be surprised if you see worse than usual? It sounds to me like your vision is following your intention!
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#3
Bates wrote:
Quote:WHEN the eye with normal vision regards a letter either at the nearpoint or at the
distance, the letter may appear to pulsate, or to move in various directions, from
side to side, up and down, or obliquely. When it looks from one letter to another
on the Snellen test card, or from one side of a letter to another, not only the
letter, but the whole line of letters and the whole card, may appear to move from
side to side. This apparent movement is due to the shifting of the eye, and is
always in a direction contrary to its movement.
In my case everything pulsate, but at the nearpoint it's less appreciable, and when vison become clear (at the nearpoint) this pulsation disappear.
and:
Quote:The shifting of the eye with normal vision is usually not conspicuous, but by
direct examination with the ophthalmoscope it can always be demonstrated.
Quote:If the vision is normal these movements are
extremely rapid and unaccompanied by any appearance of effort. The shifting of
the eye with imperfect sight, on the contrary, is slower, its excursions are wider,
and the movements are jerky and made with apparent effort.
So, this pulsation is the shifting of the eye?
If normal shifts ara rapid and not conspicuous maybe I doing something wrong with my eyes, because my shifts are conspicuous..
Nancy, I simply dont try to force my eyes to see clear, and then pulsation appers
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#4
luke Wrote:In my case everything pulsate, but at the nearpoint it's less appreciable, and when vison become clear (at the nearpoint) this pulsation disappear.
and:

Hi Luke,

If and when your vision becomes clear, no need to worry about anything - just enjoy the clarity! It isn't necessary to be continuously conscious of the short swing in order to have normal sight.

luke Wrote:So, this pulsation is the shifting of the eye?
If normal shifts ara rapid and not conspicuous maybe I doing something wrong with my eyes, because my shifts are conspicuous..

Bates meant they aren't really conspicuous to somebody else looking at you, or at your eyes. The short swing may be very conspicuous to you as you look at stationary objects. If it is, that's not a bad thing, on the contrary, it's presence is essential for maintaining normal sight. But again, conscousness of it is not necessary for maintaining normal sight, as our visual system has natural built-in suppression mechanisms.

luke Wrote:I simply dont try to force my eyes to see clear, and then pulsation appers

Do you mean that you usually try to force your eyes to see clearly? The short, optical swing is merely evidence that all is well with the visual system, or close to well. It's not something that can be forced or done consciously, it is an unconscious movement, that has what feels like a life of it's own. But we can surely encourage the conditions which will allow it to flourish and operate with peak efficiency, by practicing those things which help you eliminate strain, tension, and any inclination to force your eyes to see.
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#5
Thanks arocarty for reply
I found that when the faster the pulse is the better the vision is, and finally when I obtain perfect vison the pulse disappears or I dont notice it.
In this clearly (not perfect clear in far distance, but noticable more clear in near dostance) moments my eyes are really wide open.
So I think this pulsation should be as faster and as unconscious as possible.
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#6
Yes, the closer you can get to obtaining perfect state of 'rest,' the more optimally the visual system will operate (faster, more unconsciously). Keep seeking those conditions which will help you engage that state of rest, be it palming, or whatever it is you're doing. You might want to sometimes use an eyechart to gauge how perfect your vision clears, since it's the best, most accurate feedback. And the memory of something seen perfectly, even at the nearpoint, can help our distance vision tremendously, if we can retain that perfect memory of it seen at close. Never underestimate the value of your accomplishments at the nearer ranges.
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