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perspectives on looking at smaller details
#16
David wrote:
Quote:Nancy - When you notice something you're doing wrong, like you're tensing your eyes and getting tunnel vision, be careful about trying to do the opposite thing, like trying to open your eyes wider or doing anything to relax them. In a way it seems like the right thing to do, but consider whether people with normal vision do it. It's okay to take a break sometimes, and palm or whatever to relieve some excess strain if it works, but be careful about what you're teaching yourself about what you need to do to see. It can add just another layer of programming that you'll have to come back to again and deal with. Or in other words, two wrongs don't make a right. So when you catch yourself doing something that you know is wrong, it may be enough to just stop doing it, and be patient as you catch yourself doing it over and over again and eventually stop doing it.
David, thanks and yes, I hear you. Some energy teachers say just noticing the area of body strain allows it to release, and link this to the observer effect in quantum physics. I'm not trying to do anything when I notice strain (usually) because I know that's probably a new strain. I'm really trying not to have an agenda any more of improving as fast as possible (let me fix this bad habit for good!), and just be the observer noticing what I'm doing, like I assume a baby learning to use her eyes would.
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#17
David Wrote:I'm trying to do a little research and understand better what problems people have when they try to see. When you, for example, look at a car in the distance, and you take a few seconds to look at blurry parts of it, such as what might be a wheel, the windshield, light glinting off the chrome, etc, do your eyes start feeling tense (or pressured) the smaller the things you look at? What happens right away? And then what happens after a minute or a few minutes of looking at another such object every few seconds, spending those few seconds to notice the smallest details or pieces of blur? Is there anything else you notice that you're doing, or that you want to do?
What I'm now doing to stimulate clear normal eyesight has to do with equalizing the images/information from each eye. So, before trying to focus in on an object or a point, I use a slight rhythmic head shake (sort of as if I'm saying 'No' to something) trying to get light from the general area to fall on each macula/fovea. In my case I have problems with my weaker and submissive left eye, which I have to force into the game more than the right eye, which is over-dominant. I have to relax my breathing and blinking while doing this. (I have identified an abnormal rigidity in the way I hold my head, blink, and breathe, and which have been gradually improving/relaxing.)
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#18
Thanks for the tips, David. I think you should start more Q&A threads like these. This thread has definitely helped me understand a little bit more of what you're trying to get across.

As a newbie starting out, my wish list on what I'd like to see are instructions coupled with solid, detailed examples like what you just gave here. I guess I'm a lot less confused now compared to last week. ;D
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#19
JMartinC4 Wrote:What I'm now doing to stimulate clear normal eyesight has to do with equalizing the images/information from each eye. So, before trying to focus in on an object or a point, I use a slight rhythmic head shake (sort of as if I'm saying 'No' to something) trying to get light from the general area to fall on each macula/fovea. In my case I have problems with my weaker and submissive left eye, which I have to force into the game more than the right eye, which is over-dominant. I have to relax my breathing and blinking while doing this. (I have identified an abnormal rigidity in the way I hold my head, blink, and breathe, and which have been gradually improving/relaxing.)
Martin, did you ever try to 'work' with your eyes closed?
I found out, that - when I close my eyes for palming after looking at a bright surface (for example concentraring on the eye chart in my laptop) - I see the black square 'after image' not centered, not equal with both eyes, but much more (or sometimes even exclusively) with my dominant, weaker eye.
When I then concentrate to see black with both eyes, the other eye gets it too.
Maybe this helps a bit to equalize both eyes.
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#20
Nini Wrote:Martin, did you ever try to 'work' with your eyes closed? I found out, that - when I close my eyes for palming after looking at a bright surface (for example concentraring on the eye chart in my laptop) - I see the black square 'after image' not centered, not equal with both eyes, but much more (or sometimes even exclusively) with my dominant, weaker eye. When I then concentrate to see black with both eyes, the other eye gets it too. Maybe this helps a bit to equalize both eyes.
Good idea, Nini, thanks. I too have discovered that positioning one or two bright reflective surfaces on my desktop so that they reflect the overhead light at my face/eyes definitely causes clear flashes. Which indicates I am perfectly capable of functional distance vision from my maculas/foveas, but I am simply not holding them in correct alignment with the surrounding light field/reflections/point sources.
Since light is actually always moving, so should my positioning be always moving, if ever so slightly. Other factors come into play of course (tearfilms, corneal bulging, orbital squeezing, synchronization, the optic chiasm, etc.) My picasa website has more info. Or you can review my entries in the Other Eyesight Topics forum.
And, yes, indeed, I sometimes 'work' with my eyes closed. I do think it helps orient and equalize the eyes.
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#21
Can anyone share if there's a good method to read, especially reading on laptop screen and practicing at the same time? Since I spend a large amount of my time working in front of the laptop, I thought it'd be good if I use it as a practice session.

I've read a few books on the Bates method and some say to just use your nose to draw a line through the middle of the words, some say to paint white over the words and some advise to pay attention to the white background and to inteprete the words as black interruptions on a white background. They don't sound very 'natural' to me because I don't remember reading this way when I had normal vision ( and I was a bookish kid ).

What distance should I put the screen from the eyes? Is it optimal to place it such as to experience a small amount of blur so that the eyes will adjust over time?
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#22
I'll be posting very soon on what I've learned about reading in my "Breakthroughs" thread. Stay tuned.
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#23
JMartinC4 Wrote:...Good idea, Nini, thanks. I too have discovered that positioning one or two bright reflective surfaces on my desktop so that they reflect the overhead light at my face/eyes definitely causes clear flashes. Which indicates I am perfectly capable of [normal] functional distance vision from my maculas/foveas, but I am simply not holding them in correct alignment with the surrounding light field/reflections/point sources.
Since light is actually always moving, so should my positioning be always moving, if ever so slightly. Other factors come into play of course (tearfilms, corneal bulging, orbital squeezing, synchronization, the optic chiasm, etc.) My picasa website has more info. Or you can review my entries in the Other Eyesight Topics forum. And, yes, indeed, I sometimes 'work' with my eyes closed. I do think it helps orient and equalize the eyes.
Last night, before and after my cold water eye bath, I checked my eye alignment - this time in front of the basement bathroom mirror, which has somewhat different size, lighting and positioning. I noticed that when looking straight on into the mirror, my right eye pupil appears to sit higher than my left along a horizontal axis. The result was that I had to slightly cock my head to the right and backwards in order to get both eyes lined up and with equal corneal/pupillar highlight reflections. Attaining that alignment resulted in a clear flash.
So, today of course, I have been using that muscle memory of head-cocking method and attaining similar results. However, at one point outside I was waiting to turn left, and realized if I head-cocked to the left the clear flash was improved.
All other Bates methods are still in play and required. Out of alignment and rigid: That is my visual system's problem. I am learning to correct it using the Bates methods and my own improvements and understanding. It is working.
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#24
Great, Sean. Thanks!

I discovered the strangest thing last night as I was reading some printed notes on Bates.
When I tried reading at a distance where there is a small amount of blur, I found that wherever I centralized my attention, it seems that that part of the word is blacker, and as I moved my attention along the lines, the "black highlights" moved as well.

At first, this happened spontaneously and I found that the "black highlights" comes and goes. But I began imagining the letters to be blacker where I'm focusing my attention on and I was able to see them blacker consistently. After a while, the slight amount of blur began to clear and I was able to read at this distance. I tried increasing more of the distance but it didn't work. Also, I did not notice this when I had my glasses on, and neither can I notice this when I placed the page closer ( near my normal reading range ).

Also, another weird thing :
When I looked at the word "it", both the i and t are blacker than the other words but as I tried to focus on the letter i, the t actually looked blacker. That came as a shock to me and got me wondering....why am I not seeing best where I focus my attention on? I've noticed a few times that there are certain objects that I couldn't see clearly directly ( my eyes facing head-on the object regarded ), but I could see it better when I moved my head to the side and looked at it sideways. Isn't that a sign of diffusion?
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#25
Hi Marlene,

I think you would be slightly bending the light rays entering the eye if you turn your head to the side, similar to the common myopic chin-up head tilt, w/ squinting and squeezing of the eyes, but not as drastic, obviously.

The central fixation you experienced while reading is not strange, but quite natural! Keep it up. When I read it's one of the illusions of normal sight that I see that tells me I'm seeing correctly, not trying to spread my attention too far into the periphery. If you can imagine the halos - the white spaces between words, inside letters, and actual white streaks running through the lines, it is also quite beneficial. It really brings out the blackness of the letters too. The other illusion that is helpful is noticing the constant movement of the letters when you fixate - a slight tremor, drift, pulsation (indicative of the involuntary activity of microsaccades). We really don't ever fixate, or fix/lock onto any point, it can be a misleading term. I always found it way too restricting to move my eyes across in any kind of a straight line, through the middle, or along the bottom, etc. I don't find that natural at all. I prefer to let them land where they land, more randomly. I'll occasionally notice the oppositional movement produced by larger saccades, or shifts, but not so much, as the visual system is quite adapted to suppressing that kind of movement.

Sean made some excellent suggestions for how to approach reading. I would also just add that practicing with fine print can really benefit the reading process. It helped me to uncover strains I would never have otherwise known I was producing. There's also the Huxley slot card, which I used early on, and think helped get the process of central fixation going in the right direction.

Andrew
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#26
Marlene Wrote:So, my spin on “looking at a point” is that I try to concentrate my attention to the size of an area where it feels just nice, but it’s definitely not a point/ or a pixel.
I’ve just read Aldous Huxley’s “The Art of Seeing” and I think he mentioned somewhere that it’s not necessary to purposely confine your area of attention to align with a certain size as it could produce strain, as long as you’re aware that you see best where your attention is.

What’s your take on that?

Just wanted to add a response there. I agree with Huxley here, but there's still room for confusion depending how you think about it. Notice and look at the smallest details without confining your field of vision to a smaller area. Peripheral vision is there for a reason and doesn't need to be shut out for central vision to work better.
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"Half of our funny, heathen lives, we are bent double to gather things we have tossed away." - George Meredith
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#27
Marlene Wrote:Thanks for the tips, David. I think you should start more Q&A threads like these. This thread has definitely helped me understand a little bit more of what you're trying to get across.

As a newbie starting out, my wish list on what I'd like to see are instructions coupled with solid, detailed examples like what you just gave here. I guess I'm a lot less confused now compared to last week. ;D

It has helped me too. Having to write out longer explanations forces me to make sure what I say makes sense as far as how I currently see the process of seeing correctly and that I'm not contradicting myself. I'm putting together some notes to incorporate some of the concepts in this thread into a cohesive series of several articles that I plan on posting together at once, and the plan is for it to cover most everything I currently think is important. The blog posts have been a method of getting my thoughts out so I can get feedback and revisit what I wrote and determine what's important and where I might have gone off the deep end.
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"Half of our funny, heathen lives, we are bent double to gather things we have tossed away." - George Meredith
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#28
When you look at smaller details the question arises what is the indicative measurement of the quality of the actual perception ?
I learned to install a microwave radio link today and when I should align the microwave antenna unit such that it got directed towards the other microwave antenna unit, then I needed to measure a voltage that thus was a measurement of how well I had managed to align the microwave antenna. When I turned the antenna the voltage changed and when the voltage reach a maximum 1.9V then they said it is perfect aligned now. You can come down. I thought this was easy, it didn't take that long actually to align the microwave units.
When I came home I wondered what the heck the similarity is concerning this when it comes to "looking at smaller details". Maybe there are some indicative measurement corresponding to the voltage I measured such that you with bio-feedback can more easily adapt your eyesight.
Also, I noticed:
If there are some mean estimations to be done by the visual system, then you have to wait to apply it, because applying it to early would make the opposite effect. Maybe this is the reason why trying too hard to see fails.

PS. "Passionate work makes XLNT result, but you need a XLNT meter" Smile
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#29
hammer Wrote:If there are some mean estimations to be done by the visual system, then you have to wait to apply it, because applying it to early would make the opposite effect. Maybe this is the reason why trying too hard to see fails.

I get what you mean. I tried reading again at a slight blur, trying and most of all, expecting to re-produce the bold word illusion, and ended up getting a dull ache at the back of my head. :-[
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#30
David Wrote:It has helped me too. Having to write out longer explanations forces me to make sure what I say makes sense as far as how I currently see the process of seeing correctly and that I'm not contradicting myself. I'm putting together some notes to incorporate some of the concepts in this thread into a cohesive series of several articles that I plan on posting together at once, and the plan is for it to cover most everything I currently think is important. The blog posts have been a method of getting my thoughts out so I can get feedback and revisit what I wrote and determine what's important and where I might have gone off the deep end.

Right, David. Keep the wisdom coming!

I think what I sorely need right now is a step-by-step game plan detailed out, ;D i.e. Step One : What habit should I integrate this week with a few examples on how to go about doing it. How to recognize whether I doing it right or making things worse?
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