Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Not giving up but progressing in a different direction
#1
Hi again, over the summer I came across NVI and this site, I firmly believe in it and believe I have an understanding of how it works but I have a problem. I am a student. Now I know there have been posts on this before and yes it is hard for someone to balance school and NVI at the same time but I feel that it would be better for me to have patience and wait two years for my education to finish.

The reality is that I am in all higher level subjects and it is tough, also in my country the education system is stupidly rigid, unlike the US and UK I can't really skip a year or years and come back and do my base education at any time. Technically I can but you are labelled and it is a lot harder to do anything without doing these ridiculously hard exams.

So I have decided I will focus on my studies for the moment, try and spend the summer improving my vision, spend another year in school, do my exams and then take gap year between secondary school and whatever I decide to pursue after such as college, apprenticeship ect. During this gap year I was thinking of doing some volunteering abroad and some traveling as well as doing some of the things I've always wanted to do. I believe that would be the best time for me to purse NVI.

This may sound like giving up but on the contrary it is my goal to halt any further degradation in my eyesight, any help with how I can halt it would be appreciated. (btw why does people's eyesight plateau out in their 20s?) I am going to try and stay active on this forum further improving my understanding of NVI so when I begin again I can hit it hard.

I wish everyone success in their progress and I would like to remind them to never give up.
"A strong person doesn't never cry, a strong person crys for a while, then wipes away the tears and try's again"
Reply
#2
Iwant2cdammit Wrote:So I have decided I will focus on my studies for the moment, try and spend the summer improving my vision, spend another year in school, do my exams and then take gap year between secondary school and whatever I decide to pursue after such as college, apprenticeship ect. During this gap year I was thinking of doing some volunteering abroad and some traveling as well as doing some of the things I've always wanted to do. I believe that would be the best time for me to purse NVI.
When traveling, you'll probably have to wear glasses or risk getting lost in a strange place. That is assuming your vision has not improved before then.

Can you do desk-work OK without glasses?
Reply
#3
Good point Daniel, that wouldn't be a bad idea for a separate topic, "Tips for Eye Recovery when Traveling" to be honest I think I'd manage along as I had my glasses for certain parts and when I mention traveling I am more likely to spend less time in towns and more time trekking, climbing and travelling the coast Smile that's my plan anyway. It will probably change but who knows Smile

No I'm not very good at doing desk work without glasses but I guess that would be the upside of traveling. Time to relax and do it in my free time. Who knows perhaps it may be a good idea for some people, save up and spend a few months travelling, doing all the things you've ever wanted to do, plenty of time in between to practice. Imagine how much progress you could make if you were locked up in a cell for a few months Smile (still not a good idea)

Looking forward to any other replys to this topic. Smile
Reply
#4
Well, I would hope that you would at least have someone with you at all times who could see clearly and who was aware of what you were doing. Getting lost isn't the only risk you could face; any number of unpredictable hazards might not jump out at you. I am not convinced that doing this while traveling is a good idea.
Reply
#5
Moreover, if your vision gets worse between now and then, going without glasses will be harder. I would submit that in your situation there are at most two viable options: get out of school now so that you can work on your vision without such interference, or forget about ever improving your eyesight naturally. Option #2 is not that unreasonable, since it is in effect what most nearsighted people do, and you would then not be planning your life around it.
Reply
#6
I only started NVI roughly 2 weeks ago and find that my vision has improved dramatically I am seeing almost 20/20 with my right eye although that is with day light. Like you I am starting university in a week or so but I now feel confident that I will be able to see the board without straining etc. Don't give up, education is more important yes but you can still work on your vision habits, at school when writing I always worked with my eyes too close to my jotter etc, so when I start uni I'll be focusing on eliminating habits like that. I also remember whenever I did close up work for a while and then looked around I was seeing double. Now when I'm on my laptop for a few hours and look up everything seems almost as good as it was before I started close up work. I would say that put your education first but I firmly believe that you can continue to improve your vision as long as you have a healthy balance of near work and relaxation for your eyes. Good luck!

EDIT: One thing I would suggest is to never strain, I used to do it alot and have eliminated that completely from my vision habits seeing drastic improvements so in my opinion there is a strong correlation between the degradation of eyesight and straining. Think this way too, many people with normal vision are able to maintain it while studying throughout their lives so I see no reason why you can't halt any degradation of your eyesight!
Reply
#7
david01 Wrote:I only started NVI roughly 2 weeks ago and find that my vision has improved dramatically I am seeing almost 20/20 with my right eye although that is with day light. Like you I am starting university in a week or so but I now feel confident that I will be able to see the board without straining etc. Don't give up, education is more important yes but you can still work on your vision habits, at school when writing I always worked with my eyes too close to my jotter etc, so when I start uni I'll be focusing on eliminating habits like that. I also remember whenever I did close up work for a while and then looked around I was seeing double. Now when I'm on my laptop for a few hours and look up everything seems almost as good as it was before I started close up work. I would say that put your education first but I firmly believe that you can continue to improve your vision as long as you have a healthy balance of near work and relaxation for your eyes. Good luck!

EDIT: One thing I would suggest is to never strain, I used to do it alot and have eliminated that completely from my vision habits seeing drastic improvements so in my opinion there is a strong correlation between the degradation of eyesight and straining. Think this way too, many people with normal vision are able to maintain it while studying throughout their lives so I see no reason why you can't halt any degradation of your eyesight!

Nice to hear about your apparent success, but from previous posts it sounds like you weren't very nearsighted to begin with. Someone nearsighted enough that desk-work is a problem will be wearing glasses, squinting, or hunching forward for most of the school day and when doing homework. How is that compatible with vision improvement? In most cases, such people are probably better off not seriously trying to improve eyesight. If a moderate-to-high myope is really motivated, however, then leaving school has to be considered.
Reply
#8
Daniel, your stuff about leaving school is not constructive. I am a moderate myope (formerly high) and have made tremendous progress over the past year using progressively milder lenses and sometimes going without lenses when doing so would lead to less strain. If curing bad eyesight is an end in itself, your suggestion may be more reasonable. But for most people, it's a way to make your life better, for which going to school and holding a job, etc., are important aspects for most people. If the only way to improve vision were to quit my job, I wouldn't find it worth doing. Fortunately, I've been able to make demonstrable vision progress while still managing to perform well at my computer-intensive job and have a family life and have hobbies. Has my progress been slower than if I quit my family and my job and practiced consciously every waking minute? Perhaps, because I'm not perfect and and still unconsciously do incorrect things throughout the day. But through frequent conscious attention, I'm managing to change my unconscious habits gradually. Remember that sometimes slow, gradual progress while having a balanced and fun outlook on life is, in the end, faster than trying to do too much too quickly. Part of vision improvement is learning to incorporate it into everyday life. There's no need to make extreme proposals and discourage all the newbies.

Just one more example of how vision improvement can be part of a fun, ordinary life: I don't watch much television, but now that football season is in full swing, I watch a bit every week. I do so wearing 20/40 lenses and, through experimentation, have discovered the correct mindset to have while watching football (with some principles similar to David's method) which improves my vision dramatically after a few minutes of watching the game. I plan to write an entry on NFL-induced eyesight improvement soon.
Reply
#9
Sean, I'm glad to hear about your (limited) success, and I appreciate everything you've shared at this forum. However, from your other posts, you had personal lessons from a good Bates teacher. Do you think most people, especially teens, will have that benefit? Between the scarcity of good Bates teachers and the monetary costs, it doesn't seem likely. Bates himself wrote that for people trying to improve their eyesight without such personal help, completely discarding glasses is absolutely necessary.

As far as discouraging newbies, unfortunately I think some people should be discouraged from trying this. For those who can't clearly see what's right in front of them, going without glasses isn't just inconvenient, but potentially dangerous. Sure, we can warn people to wear glasses when safety is an issue, but safety is always an issue to some degree.
Reply
#10
I'm not sure what your point is. I'm merely pointing out that there IS a gradual approach that isn't all-or-nothing. I realize I can't help everybody, and I realize that this is hard without a Bates teacher. Most of my posts are intended to share some observations that have helped my progress, but it's hard to get the point across unless you've kind of gotten a sense of how you use strain and effort.

Also, I'm happy with my "(limited) progress," as you put it. It's not a race, and there's nothing more gratifying than when you discover a previously unconscious strain. With each new "ah-hah" moment you get, it's like peeling away the layers of an onion.

Bates said that the fastest way to make progress is to discard your glasses, but vision improvement is also about discovering what works and using empirical observation. Even if there is only one correct way to use your visual system, different approaches are more or less effective ways to get to that same destination for different people, as bates himself observed.
Reply
#11
Daniel, I may have gone without glasses for years but that didn't mean my eyesight was perfect by any means. I went without glasses because I felt embarrassed about wearing them. Over the years my eyesight has became only gradually worse, probably because I never wore glasses. However, the fact remains that I am myopic and myopia is said to be an irreversible condition even if the person becomes only slightly short sighted. I'm merely sharing my experience to try help others because one thing is for sure, you're eye sight isn't gonna get better by wearing glasses from dawn until dusk.

Having said that, I understand people who are short sighted to a higher degree than myself need to wear glasses for certain jobs and for their own safety but what I'm trying to say is to limit the use of them.

As a final point, I think the more that you progress the faster the progress becomes as you can see even more details which only accelerates progress.
Reply
#12
Sean_Augensicht Wrote:I'm not sure what your point is. I'm merely pointing out that there IS a gradual approach that isn't all-or-nothing. I realize I can't help everybody, and I realize that this is hard without a Bates teacher. Most of my posts are intended to share some observations that have helped my progress, but it's hard to get the point across unless you've kind of gotten a sense of how you use strain and effort.
I guess I will add a third option to my earlier post. If you are a student too nearsighted to do desk-work without wearing glasses/squinting/hunching forward, you should either:

#1. Forget about improving your eyesight naturally.
#2. Get out of school.
#3. Find a good Bates teacher to work with personally.
Reply
#13
david01 Wrote:Daniel, I may have gone without glasses for years but that didn't mean my eyesight was perfect by any means. I went without glasses because I felt embarrassed about wearing them. Over the years my eyesight has became only gradually worse, probably because I never wore glasses. However, the fact remains that I am myopic and myopia is said to be an irreversible condition even if the person becomes only slightly short sighted. I'm merely sharing my experience to try help others because one thing is for sure, you're eye sight isn't gonna get better by wearing glasses from dawn until dusk.
I agree that it can be reversed. I've only been talking about practicality, in particular for those who pretty much need to wear glasses for several hours a day. If you were able to do desk-work fine without glasses, then your nearsightedness was fairly mild.
Reply
#14
To quote Bates' words which I referred to above:
Quote:It is absolutely necessary that the glasses be discarded. No half-way measures can be tolerated, if a cure is desired. Do not attempt to wear weaker glasses, and do not wear glasses for emergencies. Persons who are unable to do without glasses for all purposes are not likely to be able to cure themselves.
That is from the chapter on Home Treatment. In other words, if you want to improve your eyesight either find a competent Bates method teacher to work with personally, or don't wear glasses at all and do your best to cure yourself. For a moderate-to-high myope, the latter would pretty much rule out school, among other things.
Reply
#15
Daniel, I understand the logic behind your argument regarding school vs vision improvement, etc. Nonetheless, I feel that you have already repeated yourself on this topic many times in several different threads. You are entitled to your own opinion and are free to express it and back it up as you see fit, but I would prefer if you didn't write every post with the same ideas. Maybe it's just me, but it seems like every post sounds like "if you have bad myopia, then you should drop out of school or you can forget about improvement". Besides the rather discouraging tone, it also gets a bit tiring to read time and time again.
Reply

Perfect Sight Without Glasses free download