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Ted's vision blog
#61
I think the vision is worse now than in Bates era. There's much more artificial light, more close up computer work in front of those bright monitors.

But I think it's still possible. You have people who have come back significanty from -10. My vision was a little worse than yours starting out but I feel my vision has improved by leaps and bounds.

Try this. Get a friend to drive you on the highway on a sunday morning when the traffic is light, say around 7am-9am. Ride in the middle of the back seat and look through the windshielf directly in front of you between the two front seats. You might have to slouch down a little if the rear view mirror in the center of hte windshield is in your way.

Do that and look at the highway into the horizon and observe those moving itty bitty cars in the distance on that highway.

Do that for at least an hour and I'll be shocked if you don't notice a difference afterwards.

Of course, ditch your glasses or contacts when you do this. But you shouldn't be using your glasses or contacts anymore anyway.
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#62
If you think about it, vision "practices" can be counter productive if you get into a repetitive motion. It's not just about movement, but about refreshing to something new when the time is right. That could mean learning to let go and move on every so often.

I have lately enjoyed music and dance, as they are practical ways to get into the "flow" and realize that to continue feeling it, enjoying it, you must move on.
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#63
That's very true. Familiarity and routine affects the degree to which the eye accomodates to interpret what it sees. I notice diminishing returns when I use the same enviornment over and over again.
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#64
Yes, getting too repetitive as you sit and practice can work against you. You have to stimulate your interest or your brain won't fully engage. If you can't find a way to care about what you're looking at, your brain won't be getting the push it needs to do some intense processing and bring your vision on track in the moment.
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"Half of our funny, heathen lives, we are bent double to gather things we have tossed away." - George Meredith
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#65
Just realized I now notice when I'm talking to someone with glasses and they take them off and rub their eyes. Was my strain contagious? Did they become more aware of their own strain? Did I make it worse? Or better? 

I have to keep on this path because, if strain is contagious as Dr. Bates and Emily Lierman suggest, I'm either influencing people the better way or worse way. 

You could write forever. What are we trying to achieve with our time here on Earth? I like the idea of improving a malady so obvious as sub-par vision, but what else is there?

Cheers,
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#66
Gotta figure this out!

Went up to isolated camping area last night for some solitude/thinking. It was great, it felt like a useful time. I was able to relax a lot being away from the city, screens, people. Had a nice time in the morning as well, doing yoga for an hour and walking around the trails. My walk and drive home I had some clear flashes and noticed some important states of feeling that I needed to be in to get them. I think I was able to maintain extra clarity for a while in one instance.


Some ideas I have regarding all of this:

None of this is needed, at least according to some. There's literally millions of examples of people that don't eat as healthy, don't exercise as much. So what is it?

Martin Brofman has an intersting take on it. When he was diagnosed with terminal cancer and could die at any time, his whole attitude changed. He knew he had to live his time as best as possible, as he could die any day. 

He eventually cured his eyesight (nearsightedness), without knowing how he did it. I think that his, and Dr. Bates' stories of quick successes, are the sort of holy grail, showing what really is involved in vision improvement.

Idk, I'm still theorizing a lot. Here's a reference to Better Eyesight Magazine regarding quick cures:

http://www.central-fixation.com/better-e...uick-cures
  http://www.central-fixation.com/better-e...uick-cures  )


I get tired of typing all this out, and sometimes feel it's all been said. All the info needed is out there. Just a matter of doing it.
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#67
Went to the gym for like 5 hours today. Went in the sona, the hot tub, went to a yoga class, stayed after the yoga class to do my own personal yoga session, went for a nice swim, back in the hot tub, then shower. 

It was really good, my mindset was I'm going to stay as long as I want, just focusing on relaxing and getting in tune with my body. I noticed some bits of clarity, but it was interesting when I left and went to the grocery store, I noticed the strain was still there, and the blurriness definitely was still there. I sort of realized the incredibly subtle nature of it all. Like it requires intense focus or discipline for me to stay in such a relaxed state, especially when not doing your "relaxation exercises".

I think Martin Brofman's way of describing it would be that you are just used to being in a sub-optimal state and that there is a fear or really being, and remaining, as your relaxed self. You have past memories of bad consequences when you were yourself, and that prevents you from being yourself. I think that's pretty much accurate. 

I guess you have to not let anything get in the way of you being comfortable, yourself, at ease, relaxed, confident, happy, etc, and accept the consequences, some good and some bad.
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#68
(02-27-2016, 06:25 PM)ted Wrote: Went to the gym for like 5 hours today. Went in the sona, the hot tub, went to a yoga class, stayed after the yoga class to do my own personal yoga session, went for a nice swim, back in the hot tub, then shower. 

It was really good, my mindset was I'm going to stay as long as I want, just focusing on relaxing and getting in tune with my body. I noticed some bits of clarity, but it was interesting when I left and went to the grocery store, I noticed the strain was still there, and the blurriness definitely was still there. I sort of realized the incredibly subtle nature of it all. Like it requires intense focus or discipline for me to stay in such a relaxed state, especially when not doing your "relaxation exercises".

I think Martin Brofman's way of describing it would be that you are just used to being in a sub-optimal state and that there is a fear or really being, and remaining, as your relaxed self. You have past memories of bad consequences when you were yourself, and that prevents you from being yourself. I think that's pretty much accurate. 

I guess you have to not let anything get in the way of you being comfortable, yourself, at ease, relaxed, confident, happy, etc, and accept the consequences, some good and some bad.

"....you have to not let anything get in the way of you being comfortable..." -- YES!! So simple, and not easy to do. Otherwise you're straining.
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#69
Preferencing this by saying, I have been told I’m Master of the obvious. But what it takes to improve vision is obvious, and to thrive as a human in general, but people just don’t always get it:


After much extperimenting I’ve come to understand diet more. I believe the optimal, fully realized human automatically feels like eating the right foods to supply the nutrients they need at that time, and in the healthiest amount. Martin Brofman talks about when he was living with terminal cancer,  knowing any day could be his last, he decided to do and eat whatever he wished and to know  what he was putting in his body was exactly what he needed to heal himself. I take that to mean he went beyond diet recommendations and instead went completely on feel with 100% trust in himself.


I’ve spent a lot of time the past year really experimenting with foods and a bit of fasting. One thing that’s really helped was using palming sessions (most effective sessions were with binural beats or music) to really meditate on what my body really feels like it needs at the moment, mostly food wise but anything else included. You get to a point where you CAN actually imagine eating a certain food, and feel the reaction in the body. I think it’s common place/generally understood that when you imagine something or some situation, your body will react to it and exhibit symptoms/reactions as if you were really there. So imagining a food, you can get a sense for how  your body will feel and decide whether it’s best/healthiest.


The end goal then, and I assume people with 20/20 generally have a good sense of this, is you don’t need meditation to have that same amount of deep fee/intuition. Granted, there are countless people with 20/20 that have terrible diets, overweight etc. but it all makes sense for my situation. Just goes to show  there’s more at play than we currently know,, just have to go with what make sense to you.


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#70
Hello
I thought to add my take on this whole vision improvement.
I have started this journey with pretty poor vision (-3) and now I am able to do everything without glasses.
I found out most our issues are related to trapped emotions ... anger and rage get trapped if not dealt with appropriately and get accumulated in us causing us very intense health problems.
I actually found out for me was the throat (truth?) that was accumulated with intense emotional turmoil. Feeling of rage, unworthiness, doubt and so on. And it is still filled with various problems that come out but I have cured most of the issues. 
The main one for me was intense anger towards ignorance and manipulation.  The main keyword for dissolving the unhealthy emotions is "understanding".  
Maybe this will help some of you.  
Heart
Elias
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#71
(01-14-2016, 01:45 AM)ted Wrote: Just realized I now notice when I'm talking to someone with glasses and they take them off and rub their eyes. Was my strain contagious? Did they become more aware of their own strain? Did I make it worse? Or better? 

I have to keep on this path because, if strain is contagious as Dr. Bates and Emily Lierman suggest, I'm either influencing people the better way or worse way. 

I realized that when my mother is talking to me with the strain in her face (because she forgot to put her glasses) I get annoyed and my vision worsens.

If you ask me strain is pretty contagious, especially if both persons have the same problem.
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#72
Fight or Flight Response

Maybe there're relative degrees of this fight or flight response. Usually when you hear a sound that seems somewhat alarming, you stop you're activity and freeze to really hear or see that thing. Usually it's most obvious with something reasonably threatening like hearing a possible gunshot, yelling, or something unusual. I'm theorizing that the myope, since they are one to hold a stare, are fixated on a milder form of this response. They're stuck because they're literally slightly paralyzed with fear. And if that mild fear reoccurs hundreds of times a day, that would seem to have bad consequences in time and result overall in a lot less action. 

So not being afraid means being very responsive. You can be really relaxed, mostly immobile, but still responsive. If you're tired or low energy you can still shift your attention quickly, since it takes very little energy to move your gaze. So it's not necessarily about energy levels. I've noticed this with new found increased stamina in so many aspects of my life, learning how to follow some kind of flow rather than getting "stuck" in a bad position (mentally and/or physically). 

On the other hand, stress and a small amount of the freeze response is probably good as that would give you a second to really determine whether this thing was a real threat. Once you've made a good conclusion, though, you respond appropriately. Notice how it's not called the fight, flight, or freeze response.
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#73
Hello bro, can u please suggest me which anti correction lens should i use for -9 and -4?
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#74
I think the freeze response causes the saccadic eyemovements to stop. That causes the stare and consequently the lowering of the vision. (not my idea, just remembering and putting the puzzle pieces together...)
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#75
This process is tough for some reason. For me it's more difficult than anything I've ever attempted. Supposedly it should be easier than anything I've ever attempted...

Started getting even more into physical fitness, more free flowing. I basically HINT at my possibilities, I can catch glimpses of what clarity feels like. Being so far removed, you are either completely numb or you get yourself kind of moving, starting to sense, and then you realize just how far off you've been. So that, at least, is inspiring. And having a sense that I've been somewhat numb for a decade is really motivating to encourage this process. There is just no time to waste. Why have you waited so long? Who the hell knows, just don't do it anymore. It's maybe too complex to be worth it to try and understand.

Anyways, physical movements of many various types, maybe with music, palming with music while doing the "knee shaking" or sitting and moving with rhythm. As it relates to playing music (I play drums) you can't allow yourself to get stuck. When playing, you must stay loose, which means moving on to a different beat when it get's exhausting. Why do songs change, and why do they usually only last so long? Stagnation creates fatigue. 

The process if discovery continues. Keep in mind the possibility that better than normal vision is available to you right now.
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