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Better Eyesight Magazine - Subjects, Articles, Practices
#16
clarknight Wrote:Test Card Practice By Emily C. Lierman
Many people whom I have helped in this way have enjoyed practicing with the signs and small test card because by the time they arrived at their destination their eyestrain was entirely relieved. It is so much easier then to use the memory for objects seen without effort or strain. One can remember part of the sign which was seen in the subway and if during the course of the day there should be a strong desire on the patient’s part to put on glasses again, all he has to do is to close his eyes for part of a minute and remember that sign. Instantaneous relief sometimes follows and this encourages the patient to practice.
Why is it that practicing near-vision activity, like reading the test card, improve distance vision? Andrew even mentioned pushing fine print as close to the eyes as possible. I am trying to reduce the stress in my eyes, not increase it. Practicing the snellen chart at 20 feet distance makes more sense to me.
Nini Wrote:The quickest progress on the eye chart I had in the beginning, applying the simple method of E. Lierman (see here: <!-- m --><a class="postlink" href="http://www.iblindness.org/books/perfect">http://www.iblindness.org/books/perfect</a><!-- m --> ... s/ch28.php and her book: <!-- m --><a class="postlink" href="http://www.iblindness.org/books/stories">http://www.iblindness.org/books/stories</a><!-- m --> ... he-clinic/ ).
That is, I put the chart (laptop) to a distance from where I was able to 'transform' the blurry bottom line into clear, black letters.
I always did that while drinking my morning coffee (and sometimes in the evening, when TV was not very interesting...).
Every week, I pushed my laptop a bit further and came to 20/25 in good light within about 6 months.
I like your emphasis on the positive aspect of seeing clearly (the 20/20 line), although the chart has to be positioned closer than the normal 20 feet. You really only need the 20/20 line to practice with.
I always feel like I see better outside than indoors. Taking out the factor of the sun's brightness, I think it is the wide open space outside that allows our eyes to feel more relaxed. If we could somehow take that feeling indoors, our vision would relax further...similar to what Emily L. wrote above about closing our eyes and remembering...except with our eyes open like looking out the window, but all around without walls.
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#17
lou_deg Wrote:Why is it that practicing near-vision activity, like reading the test card, improve distance vision? Andrew even mentioned pushing fine print as close to the eyes as possible. I am trying to reduce the stress in my eyes, not increase it. Practicing the snellen chart at 20 feet distance makes more sense to me.

Practicing with fine print does help reduce the stress on the eyes, because it cannot be read perfectly while the eyes are under a strain. When you learn what it's like to relax and let go of strain at the near point, it then makes it possible to transfer that state over to more distant letters or objects. Flashing a more distance test card after reading fine print properly was one of the best methods Bates found for improving myopia.

If fine print is held so close to the eyes that it is just an impossible blur, the idea is that your brain will eventually just give up trying, knowing it's impossible to see, thereby helping you to let go of strain. There's that basic principle again, the less you try, the better you will see. You'll stop trying when you realize trying is futile.

In some cases, for myopes, and myopes ONLY, Bates found that it was a benefit to strain to read fine print. When one strains at the near point, it produces hypermetropia - not more myopia, but less of it. He was able to prove that very simply with his scope, and found it to be a truth even with those from whom the eye lens had been removed. Non-conventional, absolutely, but then what was conventional with Bates? One has to free oneself from conventional thinking if improvement is to be realized by these methods.

Regards,
Andrew
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#18
lou_deg Wrote:I always feel like I see better outside than indoors.

Yes, it is much easier to have good vision in bright sunlight.
I think it was clarknight who pointed out the 'pinhole' effect, the brightness reducing the diameter of the pupil.

But there is also a psychological factor:
Vision is not accomplished by the eyes alone, our mind is involved an determines to a very great extend what we see; our 'inner state' is manifested in vision.
If you are relaxed and confident, sure of your own capacities, you will all find this confirmed in the appearance of the things you look at.
In other words: "If you smile at the world, the world will smile back to you."
This has also an impact on clear vision.
The more you are relaxed and confident, the better you will see, which will lead to even more relaxation and so on...

If, on the contrary, you are unsure and doubt your own capacities and make your belief in yourself dependent on a positive confirmation, which you seek in the appearance of the things you see - then you will only find an 'manifestation' of your doubts an uncertainty, your gaze will remain widened (corresponding to your inner stress) and you will have much more difficulties to focus small details. This negative confirmation will increase your uncertainty, doubts and stress and lead to more strain, which will increase the blur (vicious circle).
The Russian psychologist Norbekov has analyzed these mechanisms and based the concept of his vision training on the creation of a positive state of mind. He is said to achieve almost 100% cures of all kinds of vision defects in his seminars (<!-- m --><a class="postlink" href="http://www.norbekov-europe.com/index.php?lang=en">http://www.norbekov-europe.com/index.php?lang=en</a><!-- m --> )
And if - in difficult conditions - you are too much aware of the difficulties and your own incapacity to deal with them and so you are expecting blurry vision, then you will find exactly what you expect.

See also David's latest blog post.

But if if you are able to 'see' the negative conditions in a 'positive' way, you can get much more profit out of them than of positive conditions. In Bates' book (and I'm sure, also in the magazines) you find a whole chapter on this topic:
Chapter 17: Vision Under Adverse Conditions a Benefit to the Eye
<!-- m --><a class="postlink" href="http://www.iblindness.org/books/perfect-sight-without-glasses/ch17.php">http://www.iblindness.org/books/perfect ... s/ch17.php</a><!-- m -->
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#19
Nini says; "Vision is not accomplished by the eyes alone, our mind is involved an determines to a very great extend what we see; our 'inner state' is manifested in vision."

You make me think; that in bright light the brain also gets more input, more to work with and more activation of the retinas cones due to all objects in the light.
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#20
Fine print can cure Myopia naturally while also preventing, clearing away presbyopia.
A safe alternative to all types of eyeglasses.

OCTOBER, 1925
READ FINE PRINT

Many nearsighted patients can read fine print or diamond type at less than ten inches from their eyes easily, perfectly and quickly, by alternately regarding the Snellen test card at different distances, from three feet up to fifteen feet or further. The vision may be improved, at first temporarily, and later, by repetition, a permanent gain usually follows.
It is a valuable fact to know, that when fine print is read perfectly, the near-sightedness or myopia disappears during this period. It can only be maintained at first for a fraction of a second, and later more continuously.
Nearsighted patients and others, with the help of the fine print can usually demonstrate that staring at a small letter always lowers the vision, and that the same fact is true when regarding distant letters or objects.
With the help of the fine print, the nearsighted patient can also demonstrate that one can remember perfectly only what has been seen perfectly; that one imagines perfectly only what is remembered perfectly, and that perfect sight is only a perfect imagination.
A great many people are very suspicious of the imagination, and feel or believe that things imagined are never true. The more ignorant the patient, the less respect do they have for their imagination, or the imagination of other people. It comes to them as a great shock, with a feeling of discomfort, to discover that the perfect imagination of a known letter improves the sight for unknown letters of the Snellen test card, and for other objects.
It is a fact, that one can read fine print perfectly, with perfect relaxation, with great relief to eyestrain, pain, fatigue and discomfort, not only of the eyes, but of all other nerves of the body.
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#21
June, 1930
Suggestions

By Emily A. Bates

1. If the vision of the patient is improved under the care of the doctor, and the patient neglects to practice, when he leaves the office, what he is told to do at home, the treatment has been of no benefit whatever. The improved vision was only temporary. Faithful practice permanently improves the sight to normal.

2. If the patient conscientiously practices the methods, as advised by the doctor, his vision always improves. This applies to patients with errors of refraction, as well as organic diseases.

3. For cases of squint we find that the long swing is beneficial to adults and to children.

4. When a patient suffers with cataract, palming is usually the best method of treatment, and should be practiced many times every day.

5. All patients with imperfect sight unconsciously stare, and should be reminded by those who are near to them to blink often. To stare is to strain. Strain is the cause of imperfect sight.

The following rules will be found helpful if faithfully observed:—

6. While sitting, do not look up without raising your chin. Always turn your head in the direction in which you look. Blink often.

7. Do not make an effort to see things more clearly. If you let your eyes alone, things will clear up by themselves.

8. Do not look at anything longer than a fraction of a second without shifting.

9. While reading, do not think about your eyes, but let your mind and imagination rule.

10. When you are conscious of your eyes while looking at objects at any time, it causes discomfort and lessens your vision.

11. It is very important that you learn how to imagine stationary objects to be moving, without moving your head or your body.

12. Palming is a help, and I suggest that you palm for a few minutes many times during the day, at least ten times. At night just before retiring, it is well to palm for half an hour or longer.

===========================

The one about turning your head where ever you look, I've heard before but this clarifies it somewhat. I have noticed a very, very subtle tendency to shift my eyes without moving my head, and I can tell that it is uncomfortable, even if it is "safe" (i.e. noone will notice). D'you think the head shifts even with very small shifts of the eye? My theory is yes, but that at some point the eye shifts are so tiny that the head shifts are hardly noticeable.
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#22
This is a really good summary of the basics. You can trust that Emily was the soundpiece of Dr. Bates, she lived w/ him, worked long, long hours by his side, probably heard these suggestions a thousand times. There's a lot in this, and it talks much about not thinking about the eyes, about how it can be detrimental. There's been much talk about that same thing here, lately.

The nerves of the neck are also linked to the eyelids; turning the neck will often trigger a blink, automatically, as do shifts, over a certain magnitude. Let them close/blink, it's also a natural reflex.
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#23
ted Wrote:June, 1930
Suggestions

By Emily A. Bates

1. If the vision of the patient is improved under the care of the doctor, and the patient neglects to practice, when he leaves the office, what he is told to do at home, the treatment has been of no benefit whatever. The improved vision was only temporary. Faithful practice permanently improves the sight to normal.

2. If the patient conscientiously practices the methods, as advised by the doctor, his vision always improves. This applies to patients with errors of refraction, as well as organic diseases.

3. For cases of squint we find that the long swing is beneficial to adults and to children.

4. When a patient suffers with cataract, palming is usually the best method of treatment, and should be practiced many times every day.

5. All patients with imperfect sight unconsciously stare, and should be reminded by those who are near to them to blink often. To stare is to strain. Strain is the cause of imperfect sight.

The following rules will be found helpful if faithfully observed:—

6. While sitting, do not look up without raising your chin. Always turn your head in the direction in which you look. Blink often.

7. Do not make an effort to see things more clearly. If you let your eyes alone, things will clear up by themselves.

8. Do not look at anything longer than a fraction of a second without shifting.

9. While reading, do not think about your eyes, but let your mind and imagination rule.

10. When you are conscious of your eyes while looking at objects at any time, it causes discomfort and lessens your vision.

11. It is very important that you learn how to imagine stationary objects to be moving, without moving your head or your body.

12. Palming is a help, and I suggest that you palm for a few minutes many times during the day, at least ten times. At night just before retiring, it is well to palm for half an hour or longer.

===========================

The one about turning your head where ever you look, I've heard before but this clarifies it somewhat. I have noticed a very, very subtle tendency to shift my eyes without moving my head, and I can tell that it is uncomfortable, even if it is "safe" (i.e. noone will notice). D'you think the head shifts even with very small shifts of the eye? My theory is yes, but that at some point the eye shifts are so tiny that the head shifts are hardly noticeable.

Good question; This is why I place some modern info. in Bates Magazines, to clarify. I think she means; seeing oppositional movement when the eyes move 'shift' even when the head, body do not move. Moving the head makes oppositional movement, 'the swing' easier to see, maybe increases its appearance. I notice the head, neck, eyes tense up, very uncomfortable when I try to keep the head, body immobile when shifting and seeing the swing.
When the eyes move, shift, stationary close objects appear to move in the opposite direction. Far distant objects appear to move with the eyes in the same direction. Practice seeing this with the eyes open and in the imagination with the eyes closed and do allow the head, body to move with the eyes; same time, direction, in sync.
Moving the head and body with the eyes when shifting is the normal function of the visual system and improves/perfects shifting, central fixation, appearance of oppositional movement, keeps the neck, head, eyes relaxed, mobile and vision clear.
When shifts are smaller and very small, tiny; the head movement is smaller and can be very small or not occur but the head, neck, eyes remain relaxed, loose and there may still be a very tiny movement almost imperceptible when shifting on small, tiny objects.
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#24
I really like her book very much, but this is one point, I never understood:
What is harmful in "looking up while sitting without raising your chin?"
I can't see any reason, except that it is rather uncomfortable if you want to look at something right over our head.
But if you just shift your eyes in a small, quick movement, I can't see any necessity to raise the chin.

I think, it all depends on the speed and the size of the shifts.
Just imagine, how odd we would look if we moved our heads all the time while watching TV....
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#25
Maybe she means if it's done all the time or holding the eyes in this position for a extended time. example; A bad habit I have is typing looking down at the keys and sometimes I will look up at the coomputer screen with just the eyes. After a while I do need to move the head/face up with the eyes. I dont my eyes, neck pull and I get a headache above the eyes. Tense muscles in forehead too?
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#26
clarknight Wrote:aybe she means if it's done all the time or holding the eyes in this position for a extended time. example; A bad habit I have is typing looking down at the keys and sometimes I will look up at the coomputer screen with just the eyes. After a while I do need to move the head/face up with the eyes. I dont my eyes, neck pull and I get a headache above the eyes. Tense muscles in forehead too?

I agree, Mary, she probably means don't get into the habit of it. An interesting study done on orchestral musicians makes some interesting connections of astigmatism and constant, asymmetric body positions,:

<!-- m --><a class="postlink" href="http://posturalrestoration.com/media/pdfs/Visual_conditions_of_symphony_musicians.pdf">http://posturalrestoration.com/media/pd ... icians.pdf</a><!-- m -->
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#27
It also reinforces the attention and visual interest.
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#28
Interesting Arocarty. Thanks. I notice they are wearing glasses. Saw this on TV last week and was wondering why so many wear glasses when music is supposed to be fun.

I think Emily is saying; ability to see things moving ‘oppositional movement-The Swing’ when the eyes move 'shift' even if the head, body do not move.
Moving the head in synchronization with the eyes makes oppositional movement, 'the swing' easier to see, can increase its appearance. The head, neck, face muscles and eyes, eye muscles tense up, feel very uncomfortable when trying to keep the head, body immobile when shifting and seeing the swing.
When the eyes move, shift when doing the long swing, sway; stationary close objects appear to move in the opposite direction.
Far distant objects appear to move with the eyes in the same direction.
Practice seeing this when swinging with the eyes open and in the imagination with the eyes closed and do allow the head, body to move with the eyes; together, at the same time, direction, in synchronization.
Then practice this while shifting on close objects; see the oppositional movement with eyes open and closed using the imagination, memory.

Moving the head and body with the eyes when shifting is the normal function of the visual system and improves/perfects shifting, central fixation, appearance of oppositional movement, keeps the neck, head, eyes relaxed, mobile and vision clear.
When shifts are smaller and very small, tiny; the head movement is smaller and can be very small or not occur but the head, neck, eyes remain relaxed, loose and there may still be a very tiny movement almost imperceptible when shifting on small, tiny objects.

When I face distant objects (a building) and do the long swing or a semi-long or shorter sway; close objects move opposite and distant objects appear to move in the same direction with the movement of the eyes, head, body.
But;
When I stop the long swing, sway and just shift the eyes (visual attention) back and forth, left and right, up, down on the distant building (without moving the head, body with the eyes or allowing only a very little head, body movement,) it shows a small opposite swing; the building moves opposite the movement of the eyes.
Same effect if I shift on a small window of the distant building.

But;
If I increase/lengthen too much the head, body movement with the eyes, then the distant building moves in the same direction the head, eyes move to. Same effect with the window.

I find it all easier, relaxing to move the head with the eyes, even if only a little as I do a pendulum swing back and forth on the distant window. This is relaxing. I am also able to shift and see the swing without head movement (though I suspect there is a tiny underlying head movement) as long as the neck, eyes… feel no tension, pulling, stay relaxed. I would not want to limit my mobility all the time.

For close objects; I can see oppositional movement of objects when only moving the eyes and when moving the head/face, body with the eyes. Objects move in the opposite direction. As with the distant object I sense there is still a tiny underlying head movement even when shifting on a tiny object, fine print letter. Blink and relax.

For the effects of the distant objects changing from a small oppositional movement to a same as movement with the eyes movement; maybe the increased movement of the head is longer than the object the eyes are shifting on so it interferes with central fixation, the length of the eyes shift? Tension is felt if the direction of the head/face over-rides, is past the point on the object the eyes are looking at. Maybe due to optics, the way the eyes work with different distances and central-fixation, correct shifting; the oppositional movement of distant objects is so small, it takes perfect vision, perfect and relaxed eye, head movement to see it.

Any ideas?
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#29
clarknight Wrote:
ted Wrote:June, 1930
Suggestions

By Emily A. Bates

1. If the vision of the patient is improved under the care of the doctor, and the patient neglects to practice, when he leaves the office, what he is told to do at home, the treatment has been of no benefit whatever. The improved vision was only temporary. Faithful practice permanently improves the sight to normal.

2. If the patient conscientiously practices the methods, as advised by the doctor, his vision always improves. This applies to patients with errors of refraction, as well as organic diseases.

3. For cases of squint we find that the long swing is beneficial to adults and to children.

4. When a patient suffers with cataract, palming is usually the best method of treatment, and should be practiced many times every day.

5. All patients with imperfect sight unconsciously stare, and should be reminded by those who are near to them to blink often. To stare is to strain. Strain is the cause of imperfect sight.

The following rules will be found helpful if faithfully observed:—

6. While sitting, do not look up without raising your chin. Always turn your head in the direction in which you look. Blink often.

7. Do not make an effort to see things more clearly. If you let your eyes alone, things will clear up by themselves.

8. Do not look at anything longer than a fraction of a second without shifting.

9. While reading, do not think about your eyes, but let your mind and imagination rule.

10. When you are conscious of your eyes while looking at objects at any time, it causes discomfort and lessens your vision.

11. It is very important that you learn how to imagine stationary objects to be moving, without moving your head or your body.

12. Palming is a help, and I suggest that you palm for a few minutes many times during the day, at least ten times. At night just before retiring, it is well to palm for half an hour or longer.

===========================

The one about turning your head where ever you look, I've heard before but this clarifies it somewhat. I have noticed a very, very subtle tendency to shift my eyes without moving my head, and I can tell that it is uncomfortable, even if it is "safe" (i.e. noone will notice). D'you think the head shifts even with very small shifts of the eye? My theory is yes, but that at some point the eye shifts are so tiny that the head shifts are hardly noticeable.

Good question; This is why I place some modern info. in Bates Magazines, to clarify. I think she means; seeing oppositional movement when the eyes move 'shift' even when the head, body do not move. Moving the head makes oppositional movement, 'the swing' easier to see, maybe increases its appearance. I notice the head, neck, eyes tense up, very uncomfortable when I try to keep the head, body immobile when shifting and seeing the swing.
When the eyes move, shift, stationary close objects appear to move in the opposite direction. Far distant objects appear to move with the eyes in the same direction. Practice seeing this with the eyes open and in the imagination with the eyes closed and do allow the head, body to move with the eyes; same time, direction, in sync.
Moving the head and body with the eyes when shifting is the normal function of the visual system and improves/perfects shifting, central fixation, appearance of oppositional movement, keeps the neck, head, eyes relaxed, mobile and vision clear.
When shifts are smaller and very small, tiny; the head movement is smaller and can be very small or not occur but the head, neck, eyes remain relaxed, loose and there may still be a very tiny movement almost imperceptible when shifting on small, tiny objects.

The post about moving the head with the eyes got me thinking and it seems also related to #11. Been doing research for a couple days and discovered a vision teacher removed the end out of Emily's #11; changed it from; "It is very important that you learn how to imagine stationary objects to be moving, without moving your head or your body." to "It is very important that you learn how to imagine stationary objects to be moving." Writing a short article on this with ideas... Will post it soon. Have realized we can see oppositional movement if the head does not move with the eyes but its more comfortable usually to move the head with eyes and it helps for perfect central fixation... Theres some different effects though depending on the type of eye, head movement and the distance. Movement also helps the eyes, brain determine debth, distance, time, speed... Interesting stuff.

Thanks you guys for causing me to 'think'. I always learn on iblindness!
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#30
clarknight Wrote:Interesting Arocarty. Thanks. I notice they are wearing glasses. Saw this on TV last week and was wondering why so many wear glasses when music is supposed to be fun.

I think Emily is saying; ability to see things moving ‘oppositional movement-The Swing’ when the eyes move 'shift' even if the head, body do not move.
Moving the head in synchronization with the eyes makes oppositional movement, 'the swing' easier to see, can increase its appearance. The head, neck, face muscles and eyes, eye muscles tense up, feel very uncomfortable when trying to keep the head, body immobile when shifting and seeing the swing.
When the eyes move, shift when doing the long swing, sway; stationary close objects appear to move in the opposite direction.
Far distant objects appear to move with the eyes in the same direction.
Practice seeing this when swinging with the eyes open and in the imagination with the eyes closed and do allow the head, body to move with the eyes; together, at the same time, direction, in synchronization.
Then practice this while shifting on close objects; see the oppositional movement with eyes open and closed using the imagination, memory.

Moving the head and body with the eyes when shifting is the normal function of the visual system and improves/perfects shifting, central fixation, appearance of oppositional movement, keeps the neck, head, eyes relaxed, mobile and vision clear.
When shifts are smaller and very small, tiny; the head movement is smaller and can be very small or not occur but the head, neck, eyes remain relaxed, loose and there may still be a very tiny movement almost imperceptible when shifting on small, tiny objects.

When I face distant objects (a building) and do the long swing or a semi-long or shorter sway; close objects move opposite and distant objects appear to move in the same direction with the movement of the eyes, head, body.
But;
When I stop the long swing, sway and just shift the eyes (visual attention) back and forth, left and right, up, down on the distant building (without moving the head, body with the eyes or allowing only a very little head, body movement,) it shows a small opposite swing; the building moves opposite the movement of the eyes.
Same effect if I shift on a small window of the distant building.

But;
If I increase/lengthen too much the head, body movement with the eyes, then the distant building moves in the same direction the head, eyes move to. Same effect with the window.

I find it all easier, relaxing to move the head with the eyes, even if only a little as I do a pendulum swing back and forth on the distant window. This is relaxing. I am also able to shift and see the swing without head movement (though I suspect there is a tiny underlying head movement) as long as the neck, eyes… feel no tension, pulling, stay relaxed. I would not want to limit my mobility all the time.

For close objects; I can see oppositional movement of objects when only moving the eyes and when moving the head/face, body with the eyes. Objects move in the opposite direction. As with the distant object I sense there is still a tiny underlying head movement even when shifting on a tiny object, fine print letter. Blink and relax.

For the effects of the distant objects changing from a small oppositional movement to a same as movement with the eyes movement; maybe the increased movement of the head is longer than the object the eyes are shifting on so it interferes with central fixation, the length of the eyes shift? Tension is felt if the direction of the head/face over-rides, is past the point on the object the eyes are looking at. Maybe due to optics, the way the eyes work with different distances and central-fixation, correct shifting; the oppositional movement of distant objects is so small, it takes perfect vision, perfect and relaxed eye, head movement to see it.

Any ideas?

Heres new info after practiing this and talking to a Original Bates Method guy;

In reference to Emily's #11 Suggestion;
Emily is saying; ability to imagine and see stationary objects moving (‘oppositional movement-the swing’) when the eyes move 'shift' even when the head, body do not move; only the eyes are moving. When the eyes shift; stationary objects appear to move ‘swing’ in the opposite direction. Close and far stationary objects show a opposite movement ‘swing’ when shifting the eyes on the object. Close objects show a longer swing. Far objects show a smaller, short swing. (Stationary objects=objects not truly moving. A moving train or person walking... is a non-stationary object.)
The opposite swing is seen mainly on close objects. When shifting on a far object it does produce an opposite swing but it is shorter. If the head the head moves with the eyes when shifting on a far object the opposite movement will appear but; if the head, body movement increase the opposite movement turns into a movement in the same direction with the eyes. Like the appearance seen when doing the long swing and sway. See examples on previous pages and later in this article.
Shift left and right on a close or far letter and see it move ‘swing’. It’s a illusion but a healthy one, a normal eye-brain function.
+ Some modern teachers think #11 is a misprint and should say; “It is very important that you learn how to imagine stationary objects to be moving.” These teachers prefer the head moves with the eyes.
+Teachers that stay only with Dr. Bates, Emily’s original practice state Emily is correct in her full statement.
Reason for these two opinions;
The movement, shift of the eyes produces the appearance of stationary objects moving in the opposite direction the eyes move to, ‘oppositional movement’. Imagining, seeing stationary objects moving is easy when moving the head, body with the eyes because the head movement increases the opposite movement. (Mainly for close objects, see variations... for distant objects in this article) The head, body usually moves with the eyes when shifting from object to object and shifting part to part on an object. Moving the head and body with the eyes when shifting is the normal function of the visual system and improves, perfects shifting, central fixation. It keeps the eyes, head, neck muscles relaxed and vision clear. Movement also prevents tension in the eye muscles and helps prevent staring. Staring is a main cause of unclear vision. Moving the head in synchronization with the eyes makes oppositional movement, 'the swing' easier to see, can increase its appearance. The head, neck, face muscles and eyes, eye muscles can tense up, feel uncomfortable when constantly trying to keep the head, body immobile when shifting so it is best to allow relaxed head movement; turn the head/face with the eyes - face the object, part of the object the eyes are looking at. The eyes shift continually; let the head move naturally, automatically with the eyes. Blink and relax.
When shifts are smaller, the head movement is smaller. When shifts are very small, tiny, the head movement may be very small or not occur but the head, neck, eyes remain relaxed. There is usually an underlying tiny head movement, almost imperceptible even when shifting on small, tiny objects, small parts of objects at close or far distances. Shift on a small letter and notice that when the head moves with the eyes there is no effort, no tension. Blink.
The shorter the eyes, head movement; the shorter the appearance of the opposite swing.
The head does not always move with the eyes; Example; when sitting, leaning the head on a blanket, pillow while resting and shifting on objects, the moon at night, trees, snow or leaves falling blowing around in the wind…; sometimes only the eyes move. If your relaxed, no tension in eyes, head... the sight is clear. If larger shifts occur while looking about the scenery, the head will move with the eyes.
Teachers that stay only with Dr. Bates, Emily’s original practice state; if you move the head with the eyes when shifting on a stationary object it increases the movement of the object;
For close objects it increases the opposite swing.
For distant objects; if the head movement is small, an opposite swing is seen but if the head moves more the opposite swing turns into the object appearing to move with the eyes;
Some original teachers say;
When the eyes can imagine and see a opposite swing when looking at, shifting on a close object without moving the head, body and
When the eyes can imagine and see a opposite swing when looking at, shifting on a far object without moving the head, body; relaxation of the mind is perfect and eyesight is clear.
It must be noted the non movement of the head cause CAUSE tension and unclear vision;
I consider shifting and seeing the opposite swing without moving the head just a test done only occasionally to check if the eyes can do this. It is NOT advised to stop movement of the head when normally using the eyes, vision and when practicing Natural Eyesight Improvement, practicing shifting. This practice of seeing the swing without moving the head all the time can tense the eye, neck... muscles and this causes unclear vision. Tension travels into the mind. It’s not normal to keep the head still for each object the eyes look at! Even when shifting from part to part on a object; the head normally moves with the eyes. A tiny letter can be seen clear when the head moves a little with the tiny eye shift on the letter. Notice relaxation is maintained in this way.
When practicing the test of seeing stationary objects moving without moving the head when the eyes move; do not keep the head, body so still that it causes tension in the head, neck, eyes. Some head movement when practicing this test will prevent tension, strain.
It should also be noted that imagining and seeing the swing all the time is not necessary. People that have clear vision don’t even think about their eyes, effects of the visual system; they just go about in a positive state with automatic clear eyesight.
I tell my students; practice Natural Eyesight Improvement; then; Don’t practice; let the eyes, vision work completely natural; on their own; same as the heart beats, lungs breath without thinking about it, without conscious control. When the mind is on something interesting, positive, completely forget about the eyes, vision; that is when many people state their vision is suddenly perfectly clear. I f a object is unclear; you know what to do; just relax and shift. Use the skills you have learned to bring the vision back to better than 20/20. And remember; Dr. Bates says its normal for the vision to fluctuate in all peoples eyes. If it goes a little less clear sometimes; stay away from glasses. Use your skills, relax, eat right, keep a healthy positive mind and the vision will always return to clear. The eyes, brain, visual system have their own memory of perfect state of health and work to stay in that normal place.
When the eyes shift is short a smaller oppositional movement is seen. Try this on close and far objects; try a tiny shift; shift on a tiny object or tiny part of a object and see a tiny opposite swing. Blink, relax. Imagining the swing when shifting helps the eyes see the swing. Try this with the eyes open, closed, open. See the movement with eyes open and closed. Notice the eyes continue to move when practicing shifting, seeing the opposite swing with the eyes closed with the memory, imagination.

There is more swinging examples, information but I have to quit this post and move on. A Bates expert says; read about the Variable and other Swings in Bates magazines.
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