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The iPad and other tablets
#1
Hi all,

My impression regarding tablets was that they were overrated impulse buys from people with more money than sense (harsh judgement I know) but after having used an an iPad mini for a while I'm starting to change my opinion. What's interesting from the perspective of someone trying to improve their vision is that the screen is held at such a distance that eyestrain could be avoided. Even when I'm using a computer and practicing good vision habits, I still get the strain.
Does anyone think tablets maybe of some benefit to those who like to use computers a lot but get too much eyestrain from their use might benefit from the use of a tablet?

Cheers,
Jw
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#2
Don't know JW.

I can't afford the ipad... yet.

I tried the Barnes and Noble Nook one day in the store for a few minutes (looking at my books) and when I walked outside my eyes felt really weird and everything looked large, like my cornea, eye changed shape or something. It felt uncomfortable. I now warn people in the Nook, Kindle books to "print the book and read on real paper in sunlight".

The ipad and other devices might be different.

Thinking how abnormal the light (unbalanced, not true or full spectrum) is from electronic screens. TV; you can sit far away and also get full spectrum light from a window, in the room away form the tv. But the computer; we are closer to the screen, sometimes all day working.
The ipad, notebook; you can go outside, walk aroung in the sun with it.

There is a new notebook, laptop that has a screen that can be extended upward to eye level so you dont have to look down to the screen. Promotes good posture, relaxed neck.
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#3
clarknight Wrote:Don't know JW.

I can't afford the ipad... yet.

I tried the Barnes and Noble Nook one day in the store for a few minutes (looking at my books) and when I walked outside my eyes felt really weird and everything looked large, like my cornea, eye changed shape or something. It felt uncomfortable. I now warn people in the Nook, Kindle books to "print the book and read on real paper in sunlight".

The ipad and other devices might be different.

Thinking how abnormal the light (unbalanced, not true or full spectrum) is from electronic screens. TV; you can sit far away and also get full spectrum light from a window, in the room away form the tv. But the computer; we are closer to the screen, sometimes all day working.
The ipad, notebook; you can go outside, walk aroung in the sun with it.

There is a new notebook, laptop that has a screen that can be extended upward to eye level so you dont have to look down to the screen. Promotes good posture, relaxed neck.

Hi Clark,

Your experience with the Nook is interesting. I think people's experience with it might vary though, depending on their eye condition. I'm not sure if the Nook you used was E-ink, or uses a traditional type of backlit LCD screen. That may make a difference. Also, even newer e-Ink devices like the new Kindle have a white background which may also make a difference. Isn't your vision basically normal Clark? Maybe the Nook or Kindle might not be the same problem for a myope or astigmatic? That is, what might cause strain for someone with normal vision might not for someone who doesn't have it? I agree it's better to print the text out and read in sunlight.
You may recall when the Nintendo 3Ds came out, which is a portable device like the iPod Touch except that it displays actual 3D images without having to wear 3D glasses, many kids got headaches or felt dizzy looking at the screen. When I tried it, I found the 3D images extremely relaxing. What's interesting is that those who reported problems said they had normal vision. I just find it interesting that as someone with mild astigmatism and myopia, I found the opposite. Admitedly, I didn't use the device for that long - probably ten minutes, max.
Yes, I agree it's a benefit being able to go outside with a notebook or an iPad. That's another positive I could have mentioned about the iPad.
Thanks for your reply, Clark.

Cheers,
JW
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#4
I like to use a tablet for longer reading, it's much more cofortable.
You can hold it like a book and adjust the angle and distance easily to an optimal postition. And the print is rather small, so on the whole, more relaxing for the eyes.
But i'm not used to write with the tablet yet. I know there are people who can write on it as fast as on a keybord - but definitely not me Wink ;D .
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#5
Hey johnwayne,

I used that Nook soon after the neck injury when it was causing vision problems! Never even thought about that.

I prefer reading on real paper. I can see the fine details in the paper, ink; use central-fixation.
I think all screens have some artificial 3-D. We are still looking through glass or other cover on the screen.
Many of the new flat thin screens don't have the glass cover but it still seems to have some kind of cover, even if very thin over the text, objects.
The cover is not a 3-D effect but acts like looking thorugh glass, plasitc. Then the computer, screen make sthe 3-D.

Though I state all this, I am a major computer addict. Someday will be done with the work and go fishing, but then will probally buy a notebook, or ipad to use on the boat.
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#6
I got a Vizio tablet for under $200 last year for travel. I agree with Nini that it's more comfortable for reading than leaning into the big desktop screen, a habit I am finding very hard to break, since I can hold it up closer to my eyes and keep my back straight. Writing is limited with only the stylus to poke with, no keyboard, but it's good enough for very short notes. It's training me to be concise! Glad I got it.
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#7
My first ereader was a nook and now I have a Kindle and have never experienced any vision problems due to them. I am reading on the smallest font size and learning to push it further away. I also sometimes wave in my peripheral while reading, and am starting to read in full sunlight but still no problems. I do however notice strain while using a computer so I am only getting on here now in 5-10 minute spurts when I need to do something. To me it's always the fact that anything backlit causes strain and the ereaders are not backlit.
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