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Daniel (about the 2 diopters limit you heard)
#1
I started with -7.75 in the right eye. And I believe Im now at -5.75. I have perfect night vision with -5.5 contact lens(-5.75 glasses equivalent) at night.

Im ready to reduce my prescription one more time and to break this limit. My next contact lens will be -5 (equals to -5.25 glasses).

Who is the behavioral ophtamologist that told you that? Its backed up by any science? For what we see on animals tests, eye shortenings far greater than 2 diopters can be achieved. Theres a difference between how the animals were set myopic and how we were set myopic, yes, but my concern is at the eyeball axial length reduction, which was far greater than 2 diopters in animals.

In my opnion, people in this forum fail to improve because they rely on Bates method. Bates method doesnt really exist as a method, instead, it exists as a set of knowledge, instructions, theories (some proved wrong), relaxation techniques, and other stuff. A method is organized in such a way you dont need a entire book to know how to act.

This happened with me, i relaxed my eyes with Bates, but the improvements were minimal. When you get rid of ciliary strain your eyes tend to improve a bit. But living in a world of blur, even if you are relaxed, is not the way your eyes were designed to work. The normal eye always has the light reaching the fovea, on close-up and at distance (normal eyeball size). It is simply not designed to see things totally blurred.

After learn a bit on how the eye works, scientific data, Bates, push printing and the Frauenfeld method (to me, the best method available), Im now improving quickly and ready to share my knowledge as I am improving. If I m able to reach perfect night vision with -5.25 prescription, this will equates a improvement of 1.75 on the left eye, and 2.5 on the right eye, in less than 6 months I hope, maybe 4 months.

If it does happen I will create a thread explaining how to do. And the best of all, it doesnt rely on abstractions, but in concrete things.
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#2
(01-07-2014, 09:07 AM)lfernand Wrote: Who is the behavioral ophtamologist that told you that? Its backed up by any science?

Alexander Andrich of Ohio. I had a hard time following his explanation, but I guess that's because I'm not an optometrist or ophthalmologist.
Reply
#3
(01-07-2014, 09:45 AM)Daniel Wrote:
(01-07-2014, 09:07 AM)lfernand Wrote: Who is the behavioral ophtamologist that told you that? Its backed up by any science?

Alexander Andrich of Ohio. I had a hard time following his explanation, but I guess that's because I'm not an optometrist or ophthalmologist.

There are some people that having an accommodative spasm or pseudomyopia recovered more than 3-4 diopters, so I don't think 2 diopters is the limit. What I'm not still sure is if the normal myopia can be cured this way, I think only the functional one can be done. I'm going to a ophthalmologist to see what's happening in my eye, but I'm sure I'll need to talk with a neuro-ophthalmologist since they see better if the problem is 'cause of the eye or 'cause of the muscles in the eye (and I'm sure I'm having a ciliary spasm or accommodative excess, and having way less than 1 diopter I'm sure it's accomodative excess). I think that you can cure yourself more than 2 diopters but depending on what's your real problem.
Reply
#4
(01-07-2014, 09:45 AM)Daniel Wrote:
(01-07-2014, 09:07 AM)lfernand Wrote: Who is the behavioral ophtamologist that told you that? Its backed up by any science?

Alexander Andrich of Ohio. I had a hard time following his explanation, but I guess that's because I'm not an optometrist or ophthalmologist.

That would be good to hear what he has to say.

(01-07-2014, 10:09 AM)Nophun Wrote: There are some people that having an accommodative spasm or pseudomyopia recovered more than 3-4 diopters, so I don't think 2 diopters is the limit. What I'm not still sure is if the normal myopia can be cured this way, I think only the functional one can be done. I'm going to a ophthalmologist to see what's happening in my eye, but I'm sure I'll need to talk with a neuro-ophthalmologist since they see better if the problem is 'cause of the eye or 'cause of the muscles in the eye (and I'm sure I'm having a ciliary spasm or accommodative excess, and having way less than 1 diopter I'm sure it's accomodative excess). I think that you can cure yourself more than 2 diopters but depending on what's your real problem.

Yes, but he certainly was talking about axial myopia. Caused by the elongation of the eye ball.

Myopia is caused by strain of the ciliary muscle. When you focus close objects, the eye instantly elongates, that has been showed and measured. The ciliary muscle is not designed to contract fully for long periods of time, when this happens the eye starts to growth to compensate that strain. Pseudo myopia then becomes myopia.

Whether the strain is caused by stress, bad food (sugar is a unique cause for myopia), too much close-up focus, it doesnt really matter. Once you have developed axial myopia, just strain control wont give your vision back to normal, except in very light cases of axial myopia.

It appears everything is lost? But its not. Animal studies show the eye can not only elongate, but also shorten. The best paper for this is the IRDT theory, where the authors explain what happens to the sclera, while the axial growth or axial reduction are taking place. We have now the scientific mechanism to reverse our condition, the next thing to know is if there are any limit for eye shortening of an elongated eye, and the best method to activate the eye shortening mechanism.
Reply
#5
(01-07-2014, 10:57 AM)lfernand Wrote:
(01-07-2014, 09:45 AM)Daniel Wrote:
(01-07-2014, 09:07 AM)lfernand Wrote: Who is the behavioral ophtamologist that told you that? Its backed up by any science?

Alexander Andrich of Ohio. I had a hard time following his explanation, but I guess that's because I'm not an optometrist or ophthalmologist.

That would be good to hear what he has to say.

(01-07-2014, 10:09 AM)Nophun Wrote: There are some people that having an accommodative spasm or pseudomyopia recovered more than 3-4 diopters, so I don't think 2 diopters is the limit. What I'm not still sure is if the normal myopia can be cured this way, I think only the functional one can be done. I'm going to a ophthalmologist to see what's happening in my eye, but I'm sure I'll need to talk with a neuro-ophthalmologist since they see better if the problem is 'cause of the eye or 'cause of the muscles in the eye (and I'm sure I'm having a ciliary spasm or accommodative excess, and having way less than 1 diopter I'm sure it's accomodative excess). I think that you can cure yourself more than 2 diopters but depending on what's your real problem.

Yes, but he certainly was talking about axial myopia. Caused by the elongation of the eye ball.

Myopia is caused by strain of the ciliary muscle. When you focus close objects, the eye instantly elongates, that has been showed and measured. The ciliary muscle is not designed to contract fully for long periods of time, when this happens the eye starts to growth to compensate that strain. Pseudo myopia then becomes myopia.

Whether the strain is caused by stress, bad food (sugar is a unique cause for myopia), too much close-up focus, it doesnt really matter. Once you have developed axial myopia, just strain control wont give your vision back to normal, except in very light cases of axial myopia.

It appears everything is lost? But its not. Animal studies show the eye can not only elongate, but also shorten. The best paper for this is the IRDT theory, where the authors explain what happens to the sclera, while the axial growth or axial reduction are taking place. We have now the scientific mechanism to reverse our condition, the next thing to know is if there are any limit for eye shortening of an elongated eye, and the best method to activate the eye shortening mechanism.

Still there is some people that had accommodative excess for long time (years) and, after vision therapy (with plus lens and cyclopegic drops) recovered the 100% of their vision, but of course this was on -0.5 to -2 diopters, not more. I don't think the eye starts to growth like you say, I think it takes more time and if your diopters are not that high maybe you haven't even an axial myopia. For example, I started 2 weeks ago to stop focusing on near things for long time and some things like trying to ready everyday the Snellen chart better. I improved from having problems to ready the 20/40 to start reading the 20/25 one in 2 weeks. Now I have 0 problems to read the 20/40 one, and can almost ready perfectly the 20/25 (of course, can read the 20/30 without problems). If it was an axial I don't think I would improve like this in 2 weeks (but of course, in this case we're talking about less than 1 diopter so...)
Reply
#6
(01-07-2014, 11:10 AM)Nophun Wrote:
(01-07-2014, 10:57 AM)lfernand Wrote:
(01-07-2014, 09:45 AM)Daniel Wrote:
(01-07-2014, 09:07 AM)lfernand Wrote: Who is the behavioral ophtamologist that told you that? Its backed up by any science?

Alexander Andrich of Ohio. I had a hard time following his explanation, but I guess that's because I'm not an optometrist or ophthalmologist.

That would be good to hear what he has to say.

(01-07-2014, 10:09 AM)Nophun Wrote: There are some people that having an accommodative spasm or pseudomyopia recovered more than 3-4 diopters, so I don't think 2 diopters is the limit. What I'm not still sure is if the normal myopia can be cured this way, I think only the functional one can be done. I'm going to a ophthalmologist to see what's happening in my eye, but I'm sure I'll need to talk with a neuro-ophthalmologist since they see better if the problem is 'cause of the eye or 'cause of the muscles in the eye (and I'm sure I'm having a ciliary spasm or accommodative excess, and having way less than 1 diopter I'm sure it's accomodative excess). I think that you can cure yourself more than 2 diopters but depending on what's your real problem.

Yes, but he certainly was talking about axial myopia. Caused by the elongation of the eye ball.

Myopia is caused by strain of the ciliary muscle. When you focus close objects, the eye instantly elongates, that has been showed and measured. The ciliary muscle is not designed to contract fully for long periods of time, when this happens the eye starts to growth to compensate that strain. Pseudo myopia then becomes myopia.

Whether the strain is caused by stress, bad food (sugar is a unique cause for myopia), too much close-up focus, it doesnt really matter. Once you have developed axial myopia, just strain control wont give your vision back to normal, except in very light cases of axial myopia.

It appears everything is lost? But its not. Animal studies show the eye can not only elongate, but also shorten. The best paper for this is the IRDT theory, where the authors explain what happens to the sclera, while the axial growth or axial reduction are taking place. We have now the scientific mechanism to reverse our condition, the next thing to know is if there are any limit for eye shortening of an elongated eye, and the best method to activate the eye shortening mechanism.

Still there is some people that had accommodative excess for long time (years) and, after vision therapy (with plus lens and cyclopegic drops) recovered the 100% of their vision, but of course this was on -0.5 to -2 diopters, not more. I don't think the eye starts to growth like you say, I think it takes more time and if your diopters are not that high maybe you haven't even an axial myopia. For example, I started 2 weeks ago to stop focusing on near things for long time and some things like trying to ready everyday the Snellen chart better. I improved from having problems to ready the 20/40 to start reading the 20/25 one in 2 weeks. Now I have 0 problems to read the 20/40 one, and can almost ready perfectly the 20/25 (of course, can read the 20/30 without problems). If it was an axial I don't think I would improve like this in 2 weeks (but of course, in this case we're talking about less than 1 diopter so...)

I like to think the eye as a dynamic machine, not a static one. If you take emmetrope people, put +3.0 glasses on then, and put then to watch TV 1 hour at 6 meters, and than measure the axial length of the eye, it turns out their retinas are now closer than before. Their eye`s axial length was reduced in 1 hour. This has been done and measured, and it cannot be explained as ciliary relaxation, their retinas were seeking for emmetropia.

Our vision fluctuates a lot. Just compare your vision acuity half hour after you wake up, with the acuity after a stressful day.

We have measured that every people elongates the eye while focusing up close, and that this elongation increases the more time you spend focusing up close. So when you stop this process you can not only stop to worsening your vision, but you let room for eye shortening mechanisms to flourish and the vision to get better. The eye gets shorter and bigger every day deppending on what you do, thats the mechanism of emmetropia.
Reply
#7
(01-07-2014, 11:36 AM)lfernand Wrote:
(01-07-2014, 11:10 AM)Nophun Wrote:
(01-07-2014, 10:57 AM)lfernand Wrote:
(01-07-2014, 09:45 AM)Daniel Wrote:
(01-07-2014, 09:07 AM)lfernand Wrote: Who is the behavioral ophtamologist that told you that? Its backed up by any science?

Alexander Andrich of Ohio. I had a hard time following his explanation, but I guess that's because I'm not an optometrist or ophthalmologist.

That would be good to hear what he has to say.

(01-07-2014, 10:09 AM)Nophun Wrote: There are some people that having an accommodative spasm or pseudomyopia recovered more than 3-4 diopters, so I don't think 2 diopters is the limit. What I'm not still sure is if the normal myopia can be cured this way, I think only the functional one can be done. I'm going to a ophthalmologist to see what's happening in my eye, but I'm sure I'll need to talk with a neuro-ophthalmologist since they see better if the problem is 'cause of the eye or 'cause of the muscles in the eye (and I'm sure I'm having a ciliary spasm or accommodative excess, and having way less than 1 diopter I'm sure it's accomodative excess). I think that you can cure yourself more than 2 diopters but depending on what's your real problem.

Yes, but he certainly was talking about axial myopia. Caused by the elongation of the eye ball.

Myopia is caused by strain of the ciliary muscle. When you focus close objects, the eye instantly elongates, that has been showed and measured. The ciliary muscle is not designed to contract fully for long periods of time, when this happens the eye starts to growth to compensate that strain. Pseudo myopia then becomes myopia.

Whether the strain is caused by stress, bad food (sugar is a unique cause for myopia), too much close-up focus, it doesnt really matter. Once you have developed axial myopia, just strain control wont give your vision back to normal, except in very light cases of axial myopia.

It appears everything is lost? But its not. Animal studies show the eye can not only elongate, but also shorten. The best paper for this is the IRDT theory, where the authors explain what happens to the sclera, while the axial growth or axial reduction are taking place. We have now the scientific mechanism to reverse our condition, the next thing to know is if there are any limit for eye shortening of an elongated eye, and the best method to activate the eye shortening mechanism.

Still there is some people that had accommodative excess for long time (years) and, after vision therapy (with plus lens and cyclopegic drops) recovered the 100% of their vision, but of course this was on -0.5 to -2 diopters, not more. I don't think the eye starts to growth like you say, I think it takes more time and if your diopters are not that high maybe you haven't even an axial myopia. For example, I started 2 weeks ago to stop focusing on near things for long time and some things like trying to ready everyday the Snellen chart better. I improved from having problems to ready the 20/40 to start reading the 20/25 one in 2 weeks. Now I have 0 problems to read the 20/40 one, and can almost ready perfectly the 20/25 (of course, can read the 20/30 without problems). If it was an axial I don't think I would improve like this in 2 weeks (but of course, in this case we're talking about less than 1 diopter so...)

I like to think the eye as a dynamic machine, not a static one. If you take emmetrope people, put +3.0 glasses on then, and put then to watch TV 1 hour at 6 meters, and than measure the axial length of the eye, it turns out their retinas are now closer than before. Their eye`s axial length was reduced in 1 hour. This has been done and measured, and it cannot be explained as ciliary relaxation, their retinas were seeking for emmetropia.

Our vision fluctuates a lot. Just compare your vision acuity half hour after you wake up, with the acuity after a stressful day.

We have measured that every people elongates the eye while focusing up close, and that this elongation increases the more time you spend focusing up close. So when you stop this process you can not only stop to worsening your vision, but you let room for eye shortening mechanisms to flourish and the vision to get better. The eye gets shorter and bigger every day deppending on what you do, thats the mechanism of emmetropia.

Since I didn't study anything about the eye, I'm not that sure, but I think that when you look one or another thing, what the eye does is just accommodate or relax more, and that doesn't mean the eye changes, only that the ciliary muscle is doing less or more strenght on the eye lens, so it makes you see better or worse. That kind of changes I'm sure the eye does, but not that it changes it's size that easy.
Reply
#8
Also, what causes eye elongation is when your ciliary is used strongly, near the maximum. Like an emmetrope reading a book for several hours.if it was just like reading a book very close, the power of this strain would have to be 6 o 7 diopters.
Its like you having 2 diopters and actually your vision is -9 diopters. That doenst exist. Spasm of the ciliary muscle and near focusing during long periods, both cause ciliary strain, but at completely different levels of force.

(01-07-2014, 11:50 AM)Nophun Wrote:
(01-07-2014, 11:36 AM)lfernand Wrote:
(01-07-2014, 11:10 AM)Nophun Wrote:
(01-07-2014, 10:57 AM)lfernand Wrote:
(01-07-2014, 09:45 AM)Daniel Wrote: Alexander Andrich of Ohio. I had a hard time following his explanation, but I guess that's because I'm not an optometrist or ophthalmologist.

That would be good to hear what he has to say.

(01-07-2014, 10:09 AM)Nophun Wrote: There are some people that having an accommodative spasm or pseudomyopia recovered more than 3-4 diopters, so I don't think 2 diopters is the limit. What I'm not still sure is if the normal myopia can be cured this way, I think only the functional one can be done. I'm going to a ophthalmologist to see what's happening in my eye, but I'm sure I'll need to talk with a neuro-ophthalmologist since they see better if the problem is 'cause of the eye or 'cause of the muscles in the eye (and I'm sure I'm having a ciliary spasm or accommodative excess, and having way less than 1 diopter I'm sure it's accomodative excess). I think that you can cure yourself more than 2 diopters but depending on what's your real problem.

Yes, but he certainly was talking about axial myopia. Caused by the elongation of the eye ball.

Myopia is caused by strain of the ciliary muscle. When you focus close objects, the eye instantly elongates, that has been showed and measured. The ciliary muscle is not designed to contract fully for long periods of time, when this happens the eye starts to growth to compensate that strain. Pseudo myopia then becomes myopia.

Whether the strain is caused by stress, bad food (sugar is a unique cause for myopia), too much close-up focus, it doesnt really matter. Once you have developed axial myopia, just strain control wont give your vision back to normal, except in very light cases of axial myopia.

It appears everything is lost? But its not. Animal studies show the eye can not only elongate, but also shorten. The best paper for this is the IRDT theory, where the authors explain what happens to the sclera, while the axial growth or axial reduction are taking place. We have now the scientific mechanism to reverse our condition, the next thing to know is if there are any limit for eye shortening of an elongated eye, and the best method to activate the eye shortening mechanism.

Still there is some people that had accommodative excess for long time (years) and, after vision therapy (with plus lens and cyclopegic drops) recovered the 100% of their vision, but of course this was on -0.5 to -2 diopters, not more. I don't think the eye starts to growth like you say, I think it takes more time and if your diopters are not that high maybe you haven't even an axial myopia. For example, I started 2 weeks ago to stop focusing on near things for long time and some things like trying to ready everyday the Snellen chart better. I improved from having problems to ready the 20/40 to start reading the 20/25 one in 2 weeks. Now I have 0 problems to read the 20/40 one, and can almost ready perfectly the 20/25 (of course, can read the 20/30 without problems). If it was an axial I don't think I would improve like this in 2 weeks (but of course, in this case we're talking about less than 1 diopter so...)

I like to think the eye as a dynamic machine, not a static one. If you take emmetrope people, put +3.0 glasses on then, and put then to watch TV 1 hour at 6 meters, and than measure the axial length of the eye, it turns out their retinas are now closer than before. Their eye`s axial length was reduced in 1 hour. This has been done and measured, and it cannot be explained as ciliary relaxation, their retinas were seeking for emmetropia.

Our vision fluctuates a lot. Just compare your vision acuity half hour after you wake up, with the acuity after a stressful day.

We have measured that every people elongates the eye while focusing up close, and that this elongation increases the more time you spend focusing up close. So when you stop this process you can not only stop to worsening your vision, but you let room for eye shortening mechanisms to flourish and the vision to get better. The eye gets shorter and bigger every day deppending on what you do, thats the mechanism of emmetropia.

Since I didn't study anything about the eye, I'm not that sure, but I think that when you look one or another thing, what the eye does is just accommodate or relax more, and that doesn't mean the eye changes, only that the ciliary muscle is doing less or more strenght on the eye lens, so it makes you see better or worse. That kind of changes I'm sure the eye does, but not that it changes it's size that easy.

The animal studies showed dramatic axial increases when the myopia is set, and dramatical axial length decreases when the animals recovered. Some chickens would get to -16 diopters, with the associated dramatic axial elongation, and then recede completely to emmetropia, with its associated dramatic eye shortening. In a matter of weeks.

You can search for these papers and see for yourself, the eye is dynamic. While the instantaneous elongation seem in accommodation can be explained as ciliary tension on the sclera (thats the standard explanation). The retinal being pulled in, shortening the eye cant, because distance vision in emmetropes doesnt cause eye shortening. The ciliary is already relaxed in emmetropes, It certainly cannot make the eye shorter.

I cannot make you trust me. The best advice you can have from me is

-Control your strain, dont use correction, except for night driving or other distance needings, and make sure its not a overprescribed one, that will prevent you to get better.

-When reading or doing close-up, always do it at the edge of the focus. You will need plus lenses at your level of myopia. NEVER, EVER focus on close objects with minus correction.

-Make sure to measure the distance you read at the edge of the focus, that way you can check your improvements better than on the Snellen. Let the Snellen for big checks, and the distance from plus reading be your daily measure.

Im pretty sure you can get to 20/15 following this quickly. Because I already improved what you need to get to that , and you already have improved half of the way by what you are telling me.
Reply
#9
(01-07-2014, 11:57 AM)lfernand Wrote: Also, what causes eye elongation is when your ciliary is used strongly, near the maximum. Like an emmetrope reading a book for several hours.if it was just like reading a book very close, the power of this strain would have to be 6 o 7 diopters.
Its like you having 2 diopters and actually your vision is -9 diopters. That doenst exist. Spasm of the ciliary muscle and near focusing during long periods, both cause ciliary strain, but at completely different levels of force.

(01-07-2014, 11:50 AM)Nophun Wrote:
(01-07-2014, 11:36 AM)lfernand Wrote:
(01-07-2014, 11:10 AM)Nophun Wrote:
(01-07-2014, 10:57 AM)lfernand Wrote: That would be good to hear what he has to say.


Yes, but he certainly was talking about axial myopia. Caused by the elongation of the eye ball.

Myopia is caused by strain of the ciliary muscle. When you focus close objects, the eye instantly elongates, that has been showed and measured. The ciliary muscle is not designed to contract fully for long periods of time, when this happens the eye starts to growth to compensate that strain. Pseudo myopia then becomes myopia.

Whether the strain is caused by stress, bad food (sugar is a unique cause for myopia), too much close-up focus, it doesnt really matter. Once you have developed axial myopia, just strain control wont give your vision back to normal, except in very light cases of axial myopia.

It appears everything is lost? But its not. Animal studies show the eye can not only elongate, but also shorten. The best paper for this is the IRDT theory, where the authors explain what happens to the sclera, while the axial growth or axial reduction are taking place. We have now the scientific mechanism to reverse our condition, the next thing to know is if there are any limit for eye shortening of an elongated eye, and the best method to activate the eye shortening mechanism.

Still there is some people that had accommodative excess for long time (years) and, after vision therapy (with plus lens and cyclopegic drops) recovered the 100% of their vision, but of course this was on -0.5 to -2 diopters, not more. I don't think the eye starts to growth like you say, I think it takes more time and if your diopters are not that high maybe you haven't even an axial myopia. For example, I started 2 weeks ago to stop focusing on near things for long time and some things like trying to ready everyday the Snellen chart better. I improved from having problems to ready the 20/40 to start reading the 20/25 one in 2 weeks. Now I have 0 problems to read the 20/40 one, and can almost ready perfectly the 20/25 (of course, can read the 20/30 without problems). If it was an axial I don't think I would improve like this in 2 weeks (but of course, in this case we're talking about less than 1 diopter so...)

I like to think the eye as a dynamic machine, not a static one. If you take emmetrope people, put +3.0 glasses on then, and put then to watch TV 1 hour at 6 meters, and than measure the axial length of the eye, it turns out their retinas are now closer than before. Their eye`s axial length was reduced in 1 hour. This has been done and measured, and it cannot be explained as ciliary relaxation, their retinas were seeking for emmetropia.

Our vision fluctuates a lot. Just compare your vision acuity half hour after you wake up, with the acuity after a stressful day.

We have measured that every people elongates the eye while focusing up close, and that this elongation increases the more time you spend focusing up close. So when you stop this process you can not only stop to worsening your vision, but you let room for eye shortening mechanisms to flourish and the vision to get better. The eye gets shorter and bigger every day deppending on what you do, thats the mechanism of emmetropia.

Since I didn't study anything about the eye, I'm not that sure, but I think that when you look one or another thing, what the eye does is just accommodate or relax more, and that doesn't mean the eye changes, only that the ciliary muscle is doing less or more strenght on the eye lens, so it makes you see better or worse. That kind of changes I'm sure the eye does, but not that it changes it's size that easy.

The animal studies showed dramatic axial increases when the myopia is set, and dramatical axial length decreases when the animals recovered. Some chickens would get to -16 diopters, with the associated dramatic axial elongation, and then recede completely to emmetropia, with its associated dramatic eye shortening. In a matter of weeks.

You can search for these papers and see for yourself, the eye is dynamic. While the instantaneous elongation seem in accommodation can be explained as ciliary tension on the sclera (thats the standard explanation). The retinal being pulled in, shortening the eye cant, because distance vision in emmetropes doesnt cause eye shortening. The ciliary is already relaxed in emmetropes, It certainly cannot make the eye shorter.

I cannot make you trust me. The best advice you can have from me is

-Control your strain, dont use correction, except for night driving or other distance needings, and make sure its not a overprescribed one, that will prevent you to get better.

-When reading or doing close-up, always do it at the edge of the focus. You will need plus lenses at your level of myopia. NEVER, EVER focus on close objects with minus correction.

-Make sure to measure the distance you read at the edge of the focus, that way you can check your improvements better than on the Snellen. Let the Snellen for big checks, and the distance from plus reading be your daily measure.

Im pretty sure you can get to 20/15 following this quickly. Because I already improved what you need to get to that , and you already have improved half of the way by what you are telling me.

That's what actually I do, reading a little more far everyday, no matter if I'm on the PC, reading a book or simply watching TV (and that's really helping). Some weeks ago I wasn't able to read small letters the way I can when I'm posting this right now. Also, I could read the 20/40 chart with LOT of difficulties, since now it's clear even if I'm a little more far from it.
Reply
#10
(01-07-2014, 01:00 PM)Nophun Wrote:
(01-07-2014, 11:57 AM)lfernand Wrote: Also, what causes eye elongation is when your ciliary is used strongly, near the maximum. Like an emmetrope reading a book for several hours.if it was just like reading a book very close, the power of this strain would have to be 6 o 7 diopters.
Its like you having 2 diopters and actually your vision is -9 diopters. That doenst exist. Spasm of the ciliary muscle and near focusing during long periods, both cause ciliary strain, but at completely different levels of force.

(01-07-2014, 11:50 AM)Nophun Wrote:
(01-07-2014, 11:36 AM)lfernand Wrote:
(01-07-2014, 11:10 AM)Nophun Wrote: Still there is some people that had accommodative excess for long time (years) and, after vision therapy (with plus lens and cyclopegic drops) recovered the 100% of their vision, but of course this was on -0.5 to -2 diopters, not more. I don't think the eye starts to growth like you say, I think it takes more time and if your diopters are not that high maybe you haven't even an axial myopia. For example, I started 2 weeks ago to stop focusing on near things for long time and some things like trying to ready everyday the Snellen chart better. I improved from having problems to ready the 20/40 to start reading the 20/25 one in 2 weeks. Now I have 0 problems to read the 20/40 one, and can almost ready perfectly the 20/25 (of course, can read the 20/30 without problems). If it was an axial I don't think I would improve like this in 2 weeks (but of course, in this case we're talking about less than 1 diopter so...)

I like to think the eye as a dynamic machine, not a static one. If you take emmetrope people, put +3.0 glasses on then, and put then to watch TV 1 hour at 6 meters, and than measure the axial length of the eye, it turns out their retinas are now closer than before. Their eye`s axial length was reduced in 1 hour. This has been done and measured, and it cannot be explained as ciliary relaxation, their retinas were seeking for emmetropia.

Our vision fluctuates a lot. Just compare your vision acuity half hour after you wake up, with the acuity after a stressful day.

We have measured that every people elongates the eye while focusing up close, and that this elongation increases the more time you spend focusing up close. So when you stop this process you can not only stop to worsening your vision, but you let room for eye shortening mechanisms to flourish and the vision to get better. The eye gets shorter and bigger every day deppending on what you do, thats the mechanism of emmetropia.

Since I didn't study anything about the eye, I'm not that sure, but I think that when you look one or another thing, what the eye does is just accommodate or relax more, and that doesn't mean the eye changes, only that the ciliary muscle is doing less or more strenght on the eye lens, so it makes you see better or worse. That kind of changes I'm sure the eye does, but not that it changes it's size that easy.

The animal studies showed dramatic axial increases when the myopia is set, and dramatical axial length decreases when the animals recovered. Some chickens would get to -16 diopters, with the associated dramatic axial elongation, and then recede completely to emmetropia, with its associated dramatic eye shortening. In a matter of weeks.

You can search for these papers and see for yourself, the eye is dynamic. While the instantaneous elongation seem in accommodation can be explained as ciliary tension on the sclera (thats the standard explanation). The retinal being pulled in, shortening the eye cant, because distance vision in emmetropes doesnt cause eye shortening. The ciliary is already relaxed in emmetropes, It certainly cannot make the eye shorter.

I cannot make you trust me. The best advice you can have from me is

-Control your strain, dont use correction, except for night driving or other distance needings, and make sure its not a overprescribed one, that will prevent you to get better.

-When reading or doing close-up, always do it at the edge of the focus. You will need plus lenses at your level of myopia. NEVER, EVER focus on close objects with minus correction.

-Make sure to measure the distance you read at the edge of the focus, that way you can check your improvements better than on the Snellen. Let the Snellen for big checks, and the distance from plus reading be your daily measure.

Im pretty sure you can get to 20/15 following this quickly. Because I already improved what you need to get to that , and you already have improved half of the way by what you are telling me.

That's what actually I do, reading a little more far everyday, no matter if I'm on the PC, reading a book or simply watching TV (and that's really helping). Some weeks ago I wasn't able to read small letters the way I can when I'm posting this right now. Also, I could read the 20/40 chart with LOT of difficulties, since now it's clear even if I'm a little more far from it.

Thats good. You are signaling your eye to shorten, while in the past you were signaling your eye to grow longer with near work.

Dont accept anything other than 20/15 vision without glasses. This will make your night vision perfect. Most animals in the wild have a little bit of hyperopia, +0.25-+0.75 range, at night this small degree of hyperopia helps a lot your vision.

I use this myopia calculator to measure my progress while reading at the edge of the blur. Check it out:

http://frauenfeldclinic.com/focal-calculator/calc.html
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