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Is this amblyopia?
#1
Hello,

I'm new to the forum, hello all.

Not sure what the right category for this question is, so I'll just post it here. For many years I've worn glasses. Pretty soon my left eye got a bit weaker than the right or it was like that from the beginning, I can't remember.

In any case, at some stage on top of being weaker I noticed that even with correcting glasses I didn't see properly with that eye. Meaning: if I hold a book close enough to read with just that left eye, I can see the words somehow and also read. But it's not clear, and that's not because it's exactly blurry, more that there's a duplicate line of text either above or below the actual one. That condition is sometimes stronger and sometimes less.

So far I've ended up considering it as a form of amblyopia, but do you guys think that's really so?

Apart from that "diagnosis" more important to me is of course the question whether and how I should that particular issue?

Kindly
Jost
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#2
Jost I think it's Astigmatism. I am not sure but take Expert's advise.
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#3
Thank you for your answer. Well, in all my visits to doctors and opticians no one ever spoke of amblyopia, astigmatism however has been confirmed every time by all of them. On both eyes, that is, stronger on the left eye though.

Whenever I asked any of the "experts", they would never be able to give me concrete answer, just say something like the eye is weaker or whatever.
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#4
(10-16-2014, 02:48 PM)Jost Wrote: Thank you for your answer. Well, in all my visits to doctors and opticians no one ever spoke of amblyopia, astigmatism however has been confirmed every time by all of them. On both eyes, that is, stronger on the left eye though.

Whenever I asked any of the "experts", they would never be able to give me concrete answer, just say something like the eye is weaker or whatever.

Amblyopia or "wandering eye" or "lazy eye" (it's not lazy, really trying too hard) is when an eye deviates away from looking straight ahead, giving you a cock-eyed look. Astigmatism is when an eye has an irregularity in the surface of the cornea, which can make the view from that eye look warped. That sounds like what you have. Here's a post I wrote about that since I get so many questions on it. http://www.iblindness.org/1051/yes-but-i-have-astigmatism/

As you say, the name of the condition isn't as important as what to do about it. One good exercise for astigmatism is the Tibetan Wheel, to gently stretch your vision in every angle of the 360-degree visual field. You can also just do simple slow eye circles, and notice where it's more difficult, then spend a bit more time there.
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#5
Thank you Nancy for your reply and suggestion. I know that amblyopia mainly refers to the condition you describe and often comes in conjunction with strabismus. However, it seems that some definitions stretch it to also just an inability to focus an object in spite of sufficient proximity.

As for the Tibetan Wheel, yes, I have a book by Leo Angart and he has the wheel and exercises in the book. Currently I'm reading Quackenbush's book and am quite thrilled about the insights I'm gaining on Bates' method and Quackenbush's take on it. So for the next months (/years ;-) I wanted to follow that program and he rather discourages people to do particular eye exercises as such.

What is your opinion on that, do you think it combines well doing the wheel exercise? Do you have any experience if these exercises produce lasting effects?

Best wishes
Jost
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#6
(10-18-2014, 05:35 PM)Jost Wrote: Thank you Nancy for your reply and suggestion. I know that amblyopia mainly refers to the condition you describe and often comes in conjunction with strabismus. However, it seems that some definitions stretch it to also just an inability to focus an object in spite of sufficient proximity.

As for the Tibetan Wheel, yes, I have a book by Leo Angart and he has the wheel and exercises in the book. Currently I'm reading Quackenbush's book and am quite thrilled about the insights I'm gaining on Bates' method and Quackenbush's take on it. So for the next months (/years ;-) I wanted to follow that program and he rather discourages people to do particular eye exercises as such.

What is your opinion on that, do you think it combines well doing the wheel exercise? Do you have any experience if these exercises produce lasting effects?
Best wishes
Jost

Jost, I've followed a lot of teachers, vision and otherwise, but none blindly (ha ha at the unintended vision joke!). Use your own judgment -- try the Wheel and see if you feel enormous strain, or nothing, or some slight twinges at a particular point. I notice when I'm tired and my eyes need rest, looking up to the left feels sore -- this kind of personal understanding about your own eyes is invaluable. My left eye still sees more blurry than my right and needs more babying, so I pay attention to that.

Just like with other vision exercises, do the ones that give you the most benefit. Some people hate palming and get restless, while some people love it and sink into the relaxation gratefully. Dictating "You have to do the Wheel to improve your astigmatism!" doesn't take the individual into account. I think the Wheel is worthwhile doing occasionally, not obsessively -- it can rapidly feel like "forcing it" which is never helpful. Personally I prefer simple eye circles. I started out so nearsighted, the last thing I needed was lots of intense over-focusing. My behavioral optometrist told me I needed to "diverge, diverge, diverge!". But that's me. Try the Wheel yourself and see how you like it. You want to learn from teachers, like Tom Quackenbush or David or me, but own the authority yourself over your eyes.

Oh, have you removed the astigmatism (CYL) correction from your glasses if you're wearing glasses? This might have been the most useful thing I did, right at the start. Looking through the CYL prescription just keeps the astigmatism pattern in place.
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#7
Dear Nancy,

that's excellent advice and I'm all with you on finding your own way of using proven techniques. I'm a homeopath and like individualization quite a bit ;-)

In fact, I've bought Leo Angart's book about a year ago and have done the string exercise with the weaker eye for a considerable time. With that I had effects, but they were, looking back now, temporary. That's why I'm hesitant and asked about your experience with the exercise.

Very useful also your hint for the reduced prescription! I have taken off my glasses while doing a prolonged fast and haven't used them in 6 weeks or longer, they seem quite funny now when I put them on. But I will get reduced glasses soon so I will take into account leaving out the astigmatism correction for them.
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#8
(10-20-2014, 06:04 PM)Jost Wrote: Dear Nancy,

that's excellent advice and I'm all with you on finding your own way of using proven techniques. I'm a homeopath and like individualization quite a bit ;-)

In fact, I've bought Leo Angart's book about a year ago and have done the string exercise with the weaker eye for a considerable time. With that I had effects, but they were, looking back now, temporary. That's why I'm hesitant and asked about your experience with the exercise.

Very useful also your hint for the reduced prescription! I have taken off my glasses while doing a prolonged fast and haven't used them in 6 weeks or longer, they seem quite funny now when I put them on. But I will get reduced glasses soon so I will take into account leaving out the astigmatisTm correction for them.

Keep us posted -- we all learn from each other's experience if we share it. In prescribing weaker glasses for patients, my behavioral optometrist took the CYL correction out completley if it was less than 2.0, otherwise reduced it. Remember you're moving toward the time when your eyes can do everything you need them to without glasses, so only use that "crutch" now when you really need it, and keep the duration brief. Looking through glasses reinforces (and can re-introduce) that particular pattern of strain coded into the prescription.
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#9
(10-21-2014, 10:29 AM)Nancy Wrote: Keep us posted -- we all learn from each other's experience if we share it. In prescribing weaker glasses for patients, my behavioral optometrist took the CYL correction out completley if it was less than 2.0, otherwise reduced it. Remember you're moving toward the time when your eyes can do everything you need them to without glasses, so only use that "crutch" now when you really need it, and keep the duration brief. Looking through glasses reinforces (and can re-introduce) that particular pattern of strain coded into the prescription.

Yes, that's the plan for me, to use them as little as possible. On the other hand, it will be too impractical for now completely without glasses as I can't even recognize people's faces further away than a meter or two.
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#10
Hello all,

after not wearing my glasses for about three months I've recently tried them out and they feel funny, so I didn't wear them and decided to get new prescriptions for the frame with the reduced prescription and possibly without CYL correction.

So I went to an optician, he measured and said that now the myopia in both eyes is lower (1.5 and 2 instead of 3 and 3.75 before!), but the astigmatism had gone up on the stronger eye.

I was really happy to hear that and felt immediately reassured to continue training my eyes. To get another measurement I went again to another optician a few days later (today) and he told me that basically the prescription is the same as with the glasses I currently have, only that the astigmatism had gone up but viewing with a higher CYL correction didn't improve in the test he did.

So I'm a bit confused now about that result. I know that the results can vary quite a bit even in one day. But of course I felt a bit disappointed about that today.

For now I think I want to start with the exercises for astigmatism (tibetan wheel) and then after a while (how long?) have another measurement taken.

What do you guys think of all that?
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#11
What you describe is a common experience with anyone who has worked on their vision enough to experience some changes. Your system will become upset such that that every time you go to the eye doctor the measurement they take can vary a little or a lot. If you want to try to get the lowest prescription you can, it may help if you don't tell him what your prior prescription was, so that he doesn't try to "fit" you to it by over-prescribing.

I suspect some eye doctors have a bias towards over-prescribing. It's like how an alcoholic wants other people to drink too because it makes him feel less bad.
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#12
Hello David,

I appreciate your comment, that's very reassuring. Yes, and a good idea which I also had. Not have any preconceptions about what my prescriptions should be, so I'll just go as if I've never had glasses.

I'll keep you guys posted how I get on.

Merry Christmas and a good-looking new year ;-)
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