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Yelaina's Diary - Newbie
#31
(01-30-2015, 12:25 PM)Aureus Wrote: Yelaina, vision improvement is usually more like a wave rather than a straight line. What matters is that wave heads your goal which is of course - better or even normal eyesight.

In my instance it goes that way and what is a bit frustrating is that very often my vision gets more blurred unexpectedly soon after some improvement. Sometimes I know what I've done wrong but sometimes I just have no clue whatsoever. However, I'm persistent and that slowly pays off. More slowly than I'd like but that's the life.

You need to be persistent too. Keep it up. Cool

I must have said something smart since soon after posting this I turned into a 'Member' (three stars)...or it's down to the number of posts. Blush
Thanks Aureus!
I'll try to be persistent. Smile

(01-29-2015, 12:54 PM)clarknight Wrote: I know a guy that has clear 20/20 sight after about a year practicing the Bates Method.

He cant figure out why he can see clear through his old prescription glasses. He puts them on sometimes to test this. (I told him to stop doing that, it can reverse his progress.)
May I ask, what diopters were the old prescription glasses that he looked through?
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#32
The two things that halped me the most starting out were sitting in hte middle of the back seat of acar a friend was driving on a nice sunday morning when traffic was minimal but not nonexistent, and watching a football game on TV from ten feet away, focusing a lot on the score and game clock, without squinting, now matter how much I couldn't see. The prescription for my eyes was in the -4s at the time, so adjust accordingly. If your vision is worse, move a little closer to the TV, while still not too close since your vision improves more when it's not as easy to make out what you see. Blurs are your friend.

Good luck.
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#33
(04-04-2015, 07:18 AM)sleepmaster Wrote: The two things that halped me the most starting out were sitting in hte middle of the back seat of acar a friend was driving on a nice sunday morning when traffic was minimal but not nonexistent, and watching a football game on TV from ten feet away, focusing a lot on the score and game clock, without squinting, now matter how much I couldn't see. The prescription for my eyes was in the -4s at the time, so adjust accordingly. If your vision is worse, move a little closer to the TV, while still not too close since your vision improves more when it's not as easy to make out what you see. Blurs are your friend.

Good luck.

Yes, car rides are very interesting.
I sit in the back seat, and I look
a) around the interiors of the car.
b) the window of the car.
c) past the window of the car to the car beside my car.
d) look past the other car's window.
e) try to look into their interiors.
f) when the car stops at a red light, I look past the other car to the stores.
g) I read the stores signs or at least the blurry colours.
h) I see store front window and sidewalk.
i) I see inside the store past their windows.

1) I like doing this at night. The lights twinkle and glow.
I also like to play with my eyes and make the lights of cars not have a comet's tail of a wishing star.
Sometimes I see the words on the signs, but most times I cant make them out.
Sometimes if I can get a>30 min car ride, it is relaxing afterwards doing this zoom in and zoom out activity between layers of windows.
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#34
Down the line, the left-right center of the windshield, and the part of the windshield in between the rear-view mirror and the dashboard, is where the magic happens. If there's no cars directly in front of me and I have a clear view of the horizon, that's where I look. If there's a car in front of me, usually when stopped at a traffic liight, I'll look out the sides.
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#35
April 25, 2015
Supermarkets are really fun!
There is really no right or wrong way to use the eyes in a supermarket unlike a book or a computer screen. Books and computers make me impatient and sad that I cant read them quickly without my glasses.

A supermarket is different, I can go at my own pace picking up logos and signs, and letting the world go fuzzy and sharp. Seeing limes, lemons, oranges and tomatoes like those kiddie pool of plastic balls, makes me feel really happy.
Each item I figure out, after unblurring the item, reassures me that I don't need glasses.

Hey I just read a food name,
aha I just read the price,
I never knew that picture had that colour in their logo and symbol! Smile

And all those artificial kiddie snacks that I once knew, I think I see a purpose for their existence, they are there for me to read.

There was a moment yesterday when I felt like I did not squint, and my eyes opened up a little wider, not that they opened wider, but just that my focus of my view was not concentrated. It is like a shoe, you can concentrate on too much on pushing against a wall of it, but you can also relax an put the foot in the center of the shoe without pushing it against the wall. I felt like I felt comfortable seeing from inside of me, and not the strained stretched ackward position that glasses cage put my head into.
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#36
Supermarkets with their many small yet detailed objects and print on price tags are a favorite of mine, especially in the early afternoon filled with natural light before they turn on the lights which increase the glare.

I'll grab a cart and put some foot inside the cart, usually a loaf of bread, as far away from me as possible, and turn the print on the lfood label to where I can see it. I'll push the cart around the supermarket pretending that I'm shopping so I won't look too odd, when I'm really using the foot item on the end of the cart as my "near" to all the near-far focusing I'm doing in the center of my field of vision with price tags in the distance. The long straight aisles are the best.

I usually do this for a half-hour then leave. The longer I'm there the less positive effect I get, and after around 30 minutes, it's just more time efficient to rotate to some other eye-friendly activity.
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#37
I have a question for David or Nancy, or people that are close to getting their vision perfect.
In filming or photography you will find pictures with items zoomed in, and the background a blur, or the foreground a blur and an object in the background brought to sharpness.
Is that what you do to see clearly, or to see normal, or what you would consider normal?
I never had perfect vision, maybe when I was in preschool, but I don't remember much.

For example:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mBlx2WjaJvM
1:40 (cake zoomed in the coffee pots blurry, cake zoomed out and coffee pots become sharp and clear)
1:50 (utensils zoomed out, utensils zoomed in as background goes blurry)

Is that how your vision work David or Nancy?
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#38
(09-17-2015, 07:04 PM)Yelaina Wrote: I have a question for David or Nancy, or people that are close to getting their vision perfect.
In filming or photography you will find pictures with items zoomed in, and the background a blur, or the foreground a blur and an object in the background brought to sharpness.
Is that what you do to see clearly, or to see normal, or what you would consider normal?
I never had perfect vision, maybe when I was in preschool, but I don't remember much.

For example:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mBlx2WjaJvM
1:40 (cake zoomed in the coffee pots blurry, cake zoomed out and coffee pots become sharp and clear)
1:50 (utensils zoomed out, utensils zoomed in as background goes blurry)

Is that how your vision work David or Nancy?

Hi Yelaina,

While there are some similarities with a camera and the human visual system, there are many dissimilarities, so many it would probably bore you to no end to describe them. The main principles of normal sight include seeing with central fixation, constant relaxed movement that energizes and maintains a sharp image, and interest and attentiveness to what you are looking at. Vision is negatively impacted when any one of these is lacking, for whatever reason, mentally, emotionally, physically. When you see with central fixation, the small area you are looking at is always seen best, the rest of the field is worse, whether that is near, far, or equidistant. So you are essentially correct in that what you are seeing at the nearpoint is sharper than what is in the distance (or even a point closer to you), but because your fovea and attention can only be on one spot best at a time; it cannot be split equally without some type of strain. The physiology of the retina, nerves and brain dictate that it has to operate this way, if it is to operate optimally. You may be aware of other objects nearer or farther in the periphery, but your attention is predominantly on one thing, one small area at a time. Unlike the eye, cameras will record everything in their field equally clear at [X] distance, they don't have a fovea. The same snapshot from a normal eye would reveal a small area clear, and lessening of clarity the further it is removed from the central point. Also, due to binocularity, having input from 2 eyes, things closer or further away will split into 2 images. Our attention is on the fused image, and our focal point in each moment.

OK, before I bore you if not already so, just wanted to say that I don't think it's something you really have to concern yourself with, the visual system will take care of itself in that regard if you are working on those key principles of fixation, relaxed motion, and attentiveness.

Best,
Andrew
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#39
(09-17-2015, 07:04 PM)Yelaina Wrote: I have a question for David or Nancy, or people that are close to getting their vision perfect.
In filming or photography you will find pictures with items zoomed in, and the background a blur, or the foreground a blur and an object in the background brought to sharpness.
Is that what you do to see clearly, or to see normal, or what you would consider normal?
I never had perfect vision, maybe when I was in preschool, but I don't remember much.

For example:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mBlx2WjaJvM
1:40 (cake zoomed in the coffee pots blurry, cake zoomed out and coffee pots become sharp and clear)
1:50 (utensils zoomed out, utensils zoomed in as background goes blurry)

Is that how your vision work David or Nancy?

Yeah but you don't really notice it, because you're paying attention to what you're looking at like Andrew said, and you focus quickly on the distance of whatever it is you're looking at. And you only see the zooming process happening when your eyes are tense and work sluggishly.
Site Administrator

"Half of our funny, heathen lives, we are bent double to gather things we have tossed away." - George Meredith
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#40
How about you Nancy? What do you see?
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#41
(09-26-2015, 07:22 AM)Yelaina Wrote: How about you Nancy? What do you see?

I didn't answer your original post about this because I thought arocarty covered it well, and I didn't have anything to add. You wrote:

"In filming or photography you will find pictures with items zoomed in, and the background a blur, or the foreground a blur and an object in the background brought to sharpness.
Is that what you do to see clearly, or to see normal, or what you would consider normal?"

I don't DO anything to see clearly. I notice. It's a more passive activity than you realize. Yes, the periphery is blurrier than what I'm focusing on with my central vision, and I'm aware of that (usually!) if I think about it, but my attention is on what I'm looking at.
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#42
Posted something here. Takes it out.
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#43
Yelaina,

You seem to be overthinking this. Most of the terms you're having trouble with are not technical at all, but at the same time you're delving into the mechanics and optics of it all, which isn't necessary or helpful.

All these tasks like zooming are handled by your visual system automatically when you use your eyes right, and you won't get a good result by trying to observe or control them.

What will give you a good result is learning to relax your eyes while seeing best where you are looking. That's what these methods are all about.

Central fixation, attention, normal sight, etc, are all the same thing. They just mean seeing best where you are looking, and seeing clearly because of it.

The change required to see clearly is mostly mental. I think often people have a hard time buying into the idea that how they think about seeing so heavily influences the way their eyes operate.
Site Administrator

"Half of our funny, heathen lives, we are bent double to gather things we have tossed away." - George Meredith
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#44
2D:
Is Normal sight in the middle of a Venn Diagram?; the space between two circles.
Is Central fixation the midpoint point E between two circles in a Venn Diagram?
Is Attention where you point the shared space of two circles?

   
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#45
I agree with David that you are over-thinking this. Attention is where you're looking. If a beam of energy came from your brain through your eyes to what you look at, the thinner the beam, the better you'd see. And it would always be moving, point to point to point, with your interest. Anf how about thanking us for trying to help you understand, rather than accusing us of being deliberately confusing? You're blaming attitude is making me want to ignore you, though I understand you're frustrated.
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