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Reading
#1
Can you read this for me? Can you read that up there on the board? Can you tell me what that sign says? These are all common questions that I as a myope have to ask commonly, and when I am asked any of these questions I freak out, and I try to make out whatever I have to read in fear that my handicap will be discovered by anyone.

I can do almost anything that any person with normal vision can do except read things at a distance. It seems as every year it gets worse. It has gotten to the point where I can no longer read what any paper on the floor says. Reading road signs is still fine to me, but in the night it is a nightmare. I have to get ridiculously close to the sign to be able to read it at night; I have to get ridiculously close to a small computer monitor to read what I'm being explained on there. I have to squint to read what the time is on the digital alarm clock next to the DVD player, and double check on my iPhone to see if I read it right. Why does reading become so difficult for a myope? Even when I feel my vision has cleared up, I struggle to read words at a distance. My sister who has been wearing glasses full-time for about 5 years tells me that I'm really close to having to wear glasses all the time, because her vision was just as bad as mine at one point, and she remembers, and I get really scared, her lenses are really thick.

I remember as a 5 year old, I used to be really good at seeing small detail such as the windows, and doors on an airplane flying high in the sky, and the road signs from quite a large distance. I even remember when I was about 12 I was still able to see things, and read things perfectly fine. It was until I was barely able to read the 20/60 line with my left eye at my doctor's office that I was prescribed glasses, and everything became difficult to read at a distance. It wasn't that bad at first, but it slowly got worse, and now it is really bad. I discovered David's Method about 2-3 years ago, and as much as I have put so much effort into it, and have not given up on it, it hasn't stopped me from getting much worse.
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#2
Are you sure you've tried shifting the way Dr Bates proposes it?

He proposes several similar methods and concludes: "Different people will find these various methods of shifting more or less satisfactory. If any method does not succeed, it should be abandoned after one or two trials and something else tried. It is a mistake to continue the practice of any method which does not yield prompt results. The cause of the failure is strain, and it does no good to continue the strain. "

The link: http://www.iblindness.org/ebooks/perfect...g-swinging
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#3
(07-16-2015, 09:56 PM)Luis210 Wrote: Can you read this for me? Can you read that up there on the board? Can you tell me what that sign says? These are all common questions that I as a myope have to ask commonly, and when I am asked any of these questions I freak out, and I try to make out whatever I have to read in fear that my handicap will be discovered by anyone.

I can do almost anything that any person with normal vision can do except read things at a distance. It seems as every year it gets worse. It has gotten to the point where I can no longer read what any paper on the floor says. Reading road signs is still fine to me, but in the night it is a nightmare. I have to get ridiculously close to the sign to be able to read it at night; I have to get ridiculously close to a small computer monitor to read what I'm being explained on there. I have to squint to read what the time is on the digital alarm clock next to the DVD player, and double check on my iPhone to see if I read it right. Why does reading become so difficult for a myope? Even when I feel my vision has cleared up, I struggle to read words at a distance. My sister who has been wearing glasses full-time for about 5 years tells me that I'm really close to having to wear glasses all the time, because her vision was just as bad as mine at one point, and she remembers, and I get really scared, her lenses are really thick.

I remember as a 5 year old, I used to be really good at seeing small detail such as the windows, and doors on an airplane flying high in the sky, and the road signs from quite a large distance. I even remember when I was about 12 I was still able to see things, and read things perfectly fine. It was until I was barely able to read the 20/60 line with my left eye at my doctor's office that I was prescribed glasses, and everything became difficult to read at a distance. It wasn't that bad at first, but it slowly got worse, and now it is really bad. I discovered David's Method about 2-3 years ago, and as much as I have put so much effort into it, and have not given up on it, it hasn't stopped me from getting much worse.

You seem to dwell a LOT on what you can't do, on all the different imperfections of your vision, what you can't see perfectly anymore, etc. All this negativity triggers mental strain, worry, anxiety, fear, all of which can hamper vision improvement and the release of strain. This method is as much about the mental approach as it is anything else. 'Remember your successes, forget your failures.' I like what you describe as those things you can remember seeing perfectly when younger. Your description of the plane flying above and seeing the windows, the door evoked and immediate image in my mind of watching planes flying. Keep carrying those memories with you at all times, you may find one that is so vivid and strong that it can be a real optimism, one which relaxes the mind and visual system. If you can remember something perfectly, you cannot help but see perfectly. But a perfectly remembered memory is something that happens instantly, without delay, and is not static, still, but remembered as parts, small parts in sequence. Take your plane door for instance. I imagined it, and also remembered that it has lots of rivots, and handle, maybe something printed on it (like
close when in flight!). Don't be satisfied with just remembering the door, remember its details, no matter how far above in the sky it might be. Shift your thoughts on those details, never try to hold a detail for more than a second. That's one of the things that seperates the pros (normal sighted) from the amateurs (myopes). They do this unconsciously, effortlessly. This all takes practice, and you have to put yourself in the right frame of mind, else all that negativity and effort creeps in and a strained approach accomplishes little.
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#4
This all helped so much guys, thank you. The reason I believe in all of Dr. Bates' ideas is because it all makes sense; I'm only 16, and I still recall memories and images of when I wasn't myopic which wasn't until I was 13. I think it might be easier for me to apply the method, but I am honestly still going to need some help because I can't really trust my imperfect visual system completely. I can't trust or rely much on it anymore because it is constantly incorrect. Sometimes I read 8:20 on the digital clock under the TV next to the DVD player and it actually said 9:30 as I see when I get closer or read the time on my iPhone.

As I'm growing, and getting older the memories of my visual system when I was a young child are starting to fade. The only thing I recall is the absence of tension, but I do not recall how I was able to keep my visual system stabilized. This is what I am constantly trying to figure out. It's not very easy for the average teenage high school student to practice the method. I'm often busy doing other things, and the method can't be used very efficiently in a fast-paced class in a dim lit classroom where perfect vision is required, and you are required to see everything on the board and copy it down. (big emphasis on Everything)

My parents don't really believe in the method much and they blame the computer and video games. My sister believes it is fully genetic on my mom's side, and that I am doomed to wear glasses with worsening vision for the rest of my life. My mom has to wear glasses for nearsightedness and astigmatism, and my dad is presbyopic. I don't fully believe the genetics side, but I fear the event that it turns out to be true.

As you can see, I don't have a very reliable influence. Everyone in my family suffers from a refractive error of some sort. I appreciate your help; when I first joined this forum, I was just told to wear my glasses. In conclusion, It will be pretty difficult for me to stop practicing the method, but whether I will achieve my goal or not is a non answered question.
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#5
(07-19-2015, 01:12 AM)Luis210 Wrote: This all helped so much guys, thank you. The reason I believe in all of Dr. Bates' ideas is because it all makes sense; I'm only 16, and I still recall memories and images of when I wasn't myopic which wasn't until I was 13. I think it might be easier for me to apply the method, but I am honestly still going to need some help because I can't really trust my imperfect visual system completely. I can't trust or rely much on it anymore because it is constantly incorrect. Sometimes I read 8:20 on the digital clock under the TV next to the DVD player and it actually said 9:30 as I see when I get closer or read the time on my iPhone.

As I'm growing, and getting older the memories of my visual system when I was a young child are starting to fade. The only thing I recall is the absence of tension, but I do not recall how I was able to keep my visual system stabilized. This is what I am constantly trying to figure out. It's not very easy for the average teenage high school student to practice the method. I'm often busy doing other things, and the method can't be used very efficiently in a fast-paced class in a dim lit classroom where perfect vision is required, and you are required to see everything on the board and copy it down. (big emphasis on Everything)

My parents don't really believe in the method much and they blame the computer and video games. My sister believes it is fully genetic on my mom's side, and that I am doomed to wear glasses with worsening vision for the rest of my life. My mom has to wear glasses for nearsightedness and astigmatism, and my dad is presbyopic. I don't fully believe the genetics side, but I fear the event that it turns out to be true.

As you can see, I don't have a very reliable influence. Everyone in my family suffers from a refractive error of some sort. I appreciate your help; when I first joined this forum, I was just told to wear my glasses. In conclusion, It will be pretty difficult for me to stop practicing the method, but whether I will achieve my goal or not is a non answered question.
Luis, see if you can find some clear-sighted people to hang out with, and observe their habits. Your mother and sister may be right about a lot of things, and I strongly disagree with them about your vision. You have to be in charge, as much as you can, sitting closer to the board, or recording the teacher or taking a photo of the notes to work with later when you're not rushed. Spend time outside without glasses, moving, doing sports or riding a bike, where it's easy for you to see. You can do this -- I'm feeling strongly that your anxiety is more central to the real problem than anything organic with your eyes.
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#6
Well, I think I spend enough time without glasses considering the fact that I don't wear them at all. Thank you for your help, although my family has been for me a lot, but they just aren't much help when it comes to my eyesight. In my home, nobody really moves or breathes so much. Everyone is just noticeably tense, although I'm the only member in my family that suffers from social anxiety.
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