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Illustration of central fixation (I tried)
#1
I know these images aren't the best, but I did what I could to illustrate central fixation. Whenever I look at a point on a rectangular object, or anything for that matter, I imagine the direction I'm looking in. For example, on a laptop computer, there's the upper left corner, upper right corner, lower left corner, lower right corner. Whenever, I look at the upper left corner, the center of vision falls onto the upper left corner of the laptop, and the center of vision appears to be oriented in the left position. I don't know. I'm not sure if this is right or not. I'm going to try to make an animation of central fixation. This might take a while. Sorry if this doesn't help any. This sense of direction appears when my vision has improved.

Picture2 = central fixation (I think)
picture3 = Eccentric fixation


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#2
i dont think it works this way i think it's more that you focus on too big area instead of a really really small one.

but i aint any authority on this matter so you'd better ask David or Nancy.
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#3
Picture2:
Tell me about picture2.
What do each of the beams illustrate?
Where are the circles seen in picture3; should picture2 have them too?

Picture3:
I wonder why picture3 lacks two beams?

@ Yankes
But, I wonder if Alkalinewater7 has the right concept?
It has always been a saying on this forum to see the smallest possible, and not to take vision in large big gulps.
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#4
(10-19-2015, 03:58 AM)Yankes Wrote: i dont think it works this way i think it's more that you focus on too big area instead of a really really small one.

but i aint any authority on this matter so you'd better ask David or Nancy.


Like I said, I tried. But I'm going to make an animation of this so don't worry. Although this is probably going to make months as I'm still in school and a newbie in programming.

(10-19-2015, 07:08 AM)Yelaina Wrote: Picture2:
Tell me about picture2.
What do each of the beams illustrate?
Where are the circles seen in picture3; should picture2 have them too?

Picture3:
I wonder why picture3 lacks two beams?

@ Yankes
But, I wonder if Alkalinewater7 has the right concept?
It has always been a saying on this forum to see the smallest possible, and not to take vision in large big gulps.

Discard those pictures. I'm going to make new ones. It's hard to explain and draw.

(10-19-2015, 11:29 AM)AlkalineWater7 Wrote:
(10-19-2015, 03:58 AM)Yankes Wrote: i dont think it works this way i think it's more that you focus on too big area instead of a really really small one.

but i aint any authority on this matter so you'd better ask David or Nancy.


Like I said, I tried. But I'm going to make an animation of this so don't worry. Although this is probably going to make months as I'm still in school and a newbie in programming.

(10-19-2015, 07:08 AM)Yelaina Wrote: Picture2:
Tell me about picture2.
What do each of the beams illustrate?
Where are the circles seen in picture3; should picture2 have them too?

Picture3:
I wonder why picture3 lacks two beams?

@ Yankes
But, I wonder if Alkalinewater7 has the right concept?
It has always been a saying on this forum to see the smallest possible, and not to take vision in large big gulps.

Discard those pictures. I'm going to make new ones. It's hard to explain and draw.

But basically, when I have like 20/60-ish vision (improved vision), I have a sense of direction. When it's really blurry, I have no sense of direction.
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#5
Sorry guys. I haven't posted the pictures yet. I've decided to make an animation instead. Hopefully, it'll be finished sometime very soon.
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#6
Alright. I've done the animation. It was made using flash professional cc. I know this animation isn't that good as it's my very first animation. I can try to make a better one.


Watch here: https://youtu.be/zFhOG61JmQM

Maybe I can use 3D animation software next time. I'll think about this. However, it'll take a little longer to make.
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#7
Good news here. A friend of mine saw the animation, and agreed that this is how he looked at objects. He has normal vision. I'm going to ask other people with normal vision if this is how they see.
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#8
(11-07-2015, 04:58 PM)AlkalineWater7 Wrote: Good news here. A friend of mine saw the animation, and agreed that this is how he looked at objects. He has normal vision. I'm going to ask other people with normal vision if this is how they see.

Good work,

I mean it is a good start, but the animation may lack to show the real effortless mental control of what you look at. It is not shown in your animation.
I take an example so you understand what I mean.
It is this famous eye-tracking clip with Christiano Ronaldo.
Basically you could look obviously in the same way from Point to Point, but yet you could strain, and it is due to that there is an effortless mental control needed also. You have to watch this video once again to understand what I meant:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2NcUkvIX6no
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#9
(11-08-2015, 03:30 PM)hammer Wrote:
(11-07-2015, 04:58 PM)AlkalineWater7 Wrote: Good news here. A friend of mine saw the animation, and agreed that this is how he looked at objects. He has normal vision. I'm going to ask other people with normal vision if this is how they see.

Good work,

I mean it is a good start, but the animation may lack to show the real effortless mental control of what you look at. It is not shown in your animation.
I take an example so you understand what I mean.
It is this famous eye-tracking clip with Christiano Ronaldo.
Basically you could look obviously in the same way from Point to Point, but yet you could strain, and it is due to that there is an effortless mental control needed also. You have to watch this video once again to understand what I meant:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2NcUkvIX6no

Making an animation that displays effortless mental control is going to take a while. I might have to use 3D software for that one. Or make a higher quality flash animation.
Reply
#10
(11-08-2015, 03:51 PM)AlkalineWater7 Wrote:
(11-08-2015, 03:30 PM)hammer Wrote:
(11-07-2015, 04:58 PM)AlkalineWater7 Wrote: Good news here. A friend of mine saw the animation, and agreed that this is how he looked at objects. He has normal vision. I'm going to ask other people with normal vision if this is how they see.

Good work,

I mean it is a good start, but the animation may lack to show the real effortless mental control of what you look at. It is not shown in your animation.
I take an example so you understand what I mean.
It is this famous eye-tracking clip with Christiano Ronaldo.
Basically you could look obviously in the same way from Point to Point, but yet you could strain, and it is due to that there is an effortless mental control needed also. You have to watch this video once again to understand what I meant:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2NcUkvIX6no

Making an animation that displays effortless mental control is going to take a while. I might have to use 3D software for that one. Or make a higher quality flash animation.

Hmm... Apparently, measuring saccadic eye movements is measuring brain function. Very interesting.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U0j7VdMI2cQ
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