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Pizza Vision
#1
My introductory post AT THIS URL covered most of this, but didn't include an image.

Here's the gist of my vision problem:

I've noticed a very strange vision anomaly, and am not sure whether it's been with me all along (decades) or not.  I think it has been, and I think it's the underlying source/cause of my blurred vision.  I noticed it while looking at a small red pilot light on an electronic device.  The room was dark and instead of seeing a single small dot or red light I saw a circular array of maybe 12 or 15 lights around that actual light - with additional lights filling the area between the actual/central light and the lights forming the circumference ring.

It's not a "starburst" as has been suggested.  It looks like a pizza with carefully arranged pepperoni slices on top.
SEE ATTACHED IMAGE BELOW

I've been researching a lot and have learned the term "polyopia."  That seems to be what I'm exhibiting, but I'm not sure whether mine is cerebral (a brain or neurological issue) or ocular (an eye issue).  There are ways to determine which it is, but my results don't appear to apply strictly to either type.  So far, I think it's the ocular version because:

1) Use of pinhole glasses does overcome the multiple images (I can see clearly), and

2) In a dark room the multi-image array is fairly large, but turning on the light reduces it's size.

Both those results indicate an ocular/mechanical cause rather than a cerebral/brain cause. 

On the other hand...
The multi-image array appears in both eyes and appears in each eye when the opposite eye is closed.  That seems to indicate cerebral rather than optical.  I hope that's not the case...

Here's a link to a document that outlines how to test whether polyopia is cerebral or ocular.  See the first three paragraphs on Page 4.
http://assets.cambridge.org/97805217/132...xcerpt.pdf


I also discovered a more generic term, "Spherical Aberration" but haven't found any clear definition of what that is or what it looks like.

ANY INFORMATION YOU CAN CONTRIBUTE IS MUCH APPRECIATED.


Attached Files Thumbnail(s)
   
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#2
I forgot to mention this:

I cannot see clearly at any distance.  Not near.  Not far.  Not in between.  

Everything is blurred, because everything appears as a primary image surrounded by "grayed out" secondary images.
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#3
(06-07-2017, 06:30 AM)okay Wrote: I forgot to mention this:

I cannot see clearly at any distance.  Not near.  Not far.  Not in between.  

Everything is blurred, because everything appears as a primary image surrounded by "grayed out" secondary images.

I'd focus on relaxing your eyes and mind, with palming or whatever technique works best for you. I'd also pay attention to when your vision is clearer, even if it's not totally clear (yet). Look for details, close or far, indoors or outdoors, day and night. If I may say so, you feel a bit like the folks who say "I'm BLIND without my glasses!" when of course they can see shapes and colors and some detail, just not crisply. Argue for your limitations, and you hang onto them. Notice when you see more clearly, and what you're doing and thinking then, then do more of that, and the clarity will increase. I believe your condition is a result of strained eyes, though I am not an eye doctor. If you visit one you may get a diagnosis with a long name, and a complicated expensive eyeglasses prescription which may or may not help. I wish you the best.
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#4
Thanks for yet another helpful reply, Nancy.

My vision problems began with a failed attempt at law school, decades ago.  I couldn't read fast enough (argh!) but had never experienced vision problems before, so I didn't understand the problem...duh.  It was a very stressful time, and I've been somewhat adrift ever since.  I appreciate your suggestion that the aberration may by related to thoughts and stress.  Your remarks are in line with what I've been thinking as I look for a pattern in all this. 

In short, I think my "visual array" is a neat analogy for the way I've been dealing with life.  I also think it may be a manifestation of stress, anxiety and a literal "loss of focus" beginning with the law school experience.   I keep that in mind and maintain Faith in God's healing grace as I pursue these methods.  So thanks for the encouragement. 

FWIW, I've lost faith in "eye care professionals" at this point, so will be avoiding the difficult-to-pronounce diagnoses and any additional lens-based vision wreckers.  That is, I'll avoid both unless I prove I cannot correct the vision otherwise...

I've been stumbling around iblindness.com and found David's Method.  Now THAT is what I've been seeking, and I wish I had found it before ordering the Bates Method book.

Two other clues to my dilemma:

1. I can see quite well (not perfectly) by wearing basic +3.0 reading glasses.  I see no multiple images.

2. All the extra images disappear when I squint through my eyelashes (sans glasses).  That has always been the case.


IF ANYONE RECOGNIZES MY SYMPTOMS, PLEASE GIVE ME (AND OTHERS WHO READ THIS) THE BENEFIT OF YOUR KNOWLEDGE.  THANKS.
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#5
One other thing in response to your post, Nancy. 

I am glad to have found GREG MARSH on YouTube.  He's a vision coach working primarily within the Bates Method.  By watching an interview and several of his webcasts, I received a very helpful first impression of the Bates Method and it's emphasis on relaxing the eyes, body and mind - directly in line with your own advice.  I've been "focused" in that direction all along. 

So THANKS for encouragement in the right direction!
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#6
(06-09-2017, 01:45 PM)okay Wrote: One other thing in response to your post, Nancy. 

I am glad to have found GREG MARSH on YouTube.  He's a vision coach working primarily within the Bates Method.  By watching an interview and several of his webcasts, I received a very helpful first impression of the Bates Method and it's emphasis on relaxing the eyes, body and mind - directly in line with your own advice.  I've been "focused" in that direction all along. 

So THANKS for encouragement in the right direction!

Yes, I'm very familiar with Greg Marsh, whom I've quoted in some of my articles, and you might hear me on a few of his webinars. I also had a few private sessions with him several years ago. He's a big believer in EFT (Emotional Freedom Technique or "tapping") for reducing stress and clearing painful emotions, as am I. I've trained in EFT extensively, using it for myself and many of my clients.

The left-brain lawyer-type mind can be an asset because you know how to focus and pay attention to details. It can be a detriment if you obsess about your eyes, the practices you're doing and the results you're not seeing yet. I know this -- it's my story too. This work is often more like art than science. Stay relaxed enough so the inspiration and clearer sight can come in, and keep gently noticing.
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#7
(06-10-2017, 10:54 AM)Nancy Wrote:
(06-09-2017, 01:45 PM)okay Wrote: One other thing in response to your post, Nancy. 

I am glad to have found GREG MARSH on YouTube.  He's a vision coach working primarily within the Bates Method.  By watching an interview and several of his webcasts, I received a very helpful first impression of the Bates Method and it's emphasis on relaxing the eyes, body and mind - directly in line with your own advice.  I've been "focused" in that direction all along. 

So THANKS for encouragement in the right direction!

Yes, I'm very familiar with Greg Marsh, whom I've quoted in some of my articles, and you might hear me on a few of his webinars. I also had a few private sessions with him several years ago. He's a big believer in EFT (Emotional Freedom Technique or "tapping") for reducing stress and clearing painful emotions, as am I. I've trained in EFT extensively, using it for myself and many of my clients.

The left-brain lawyer-type mind can be an asset because you know how to focus and pay attention to details. It can be a detriment if you obsess about your eyes, the practices you're doing and the results you're not seeing yet. I know this -- it's my story too. This work is often more like art than science. Stay relaxed enough so the inspiration and clearer sight can come in, and keep gently noticing.

One more thought -- you mentioned not being able to read fast enough to get through law school. In my years of improving my own vision, I've written a lot of posts trying to explain what I've discovered, both to cement the learning for myself and possibly to help others. Here's one you may find useful: https://www.iblindness.org/2569/vision-and-rushing/.
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#8
Thanks, Nancy. 

I read your linked article and take to heart the message of "go forward gently."  I also read your article "Lessons from a knee injury about strain."  Many, many valuable insights and corroborations in there - so thanks!

Ever since my vision problems began, and particularly in recent years, I find that I'm impatient and unwilling to look carefully at most things.  It feels too much like I'm admitting defeat, or something like that...  Ah, but a short while back I attended a still life drawing event that was the first time in decades that I "forced" myself to really look carefully and draw exactly what I see.  I find I have better powers of observation and perhaps better drawing skill than I had in my youth...whodathunkit?! 

Now if I can just work out "this vision thing" I'll be back on track as an artist. Big Grin

Thanks as always for your kind assistance,
Tom
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#9
I don't know what my vision problem is.  As described in my initial post, it's pretty weird. 

I'm becoming convinced that it's related to ASTIGMATISM.

I think the effects of The Bates Method on the muscles of my eyes will help reshape them to reverse/overcome the astigmatism.  I'm learning a lot from Greg Marsh's YouTube content and from this iblindness.org site.  I'm also gleaning information from Jake Steiner's endmyopia.org.  I don't think I'm myopic (can't see clearly at any distance...) but I think Jake Steiner's proven incremental lens reduction approach will work for me in conjunction with The Bates Method.

I lost my prescription tri-focal glasses about three years ago and have been getting by with +3.0 diopter reading glasses.  My eyes required different lenses in terms of focus and astigmatism, but wearing these reading glasses seems to have, for the most part, balanced the two eyes out. 

I can't afford to simply stop wearing glasses, but I think a gradual reduction in lens strength should accommodate the gains I make through eye exercise, relaxation techniques, diet changes and new exercises. 

With that plan in mind, yesterday I found a GREAT online deal for a range of lenses that will enable me to step down by .25 diopter increments.  I bought eight pair of non-prescription reading glasses ranging from +2.75 to +1.0.  I intend to step down by mere .25 diopter increments as my progress allows.

For the record: I tried stepping down from +3.0 to +2.5 diopter (couldn't find +2.75 locally) but the change was too much - strained my eyes. Also, Jake Steiner recommends going ONE DAY WITHOUT GLASSES each time you step down your lenses. So between +3.0 and +2.75, spend a day WITHOUT ANY GLASSES.

The source for the glasses is AmericanReadingGlasses.com
They have special deals: 3-for-$15 and 6-for-$24 on selected frames only. 
I chose the 6-for-$24 ($4 each pair) and added two additional pairs.

So the eight pair of glasses cost $32 plus $4 delivery.  $36 TOTAL.  WooHoo!
I'm looking forward to good results, assuming my bizarre vision aberration is in my eyes and not my brain... Huh

Onward!
Tom
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#10
(06-16-2017, 02:33 PM)okay Wrote: I don't know what my vision problem is.  As described in my initial post, it's pretty weird. 

I'm becoming convinced that it's related to ASTIGMATISM.

I think the effects of The Bates Method on the muscles of my eyes will help reshape them to reverse/overcome the astigmatism.  I'm learning a lot from Greg Marsh's YouTube content and from this iblindness.org site.  I'm also gleaning information from Jake Steiner's endmyopia.org.  I don't think I'm myopic (can't see clearly at any distance...) but I think Jake Steiner's proven incremental lens reduction approach will work for me in conjunction with The Bates Method.

I lost my prescription tri-focal glasses about three years ago and have been getting by with +3.0 diopter reading glasses.  My eyes required different lenses in terms of focus and astigmatism, but wearing these reading glasses seems to have, for the most part, balanced the two eyes out. 

I can't afford to simply stop wearing glasses, but I think a gradual reduction in lens strength should accommodate the gains I make through eye exercise, relaxation techniques, diet changes and new exercises. 

With that plan in mind, yesterday I found a GREAT online deal for a range of lenses that will enable me to step down by .25 diopter increments.  I bought eight pair of non-prescription reading glasses ranging from +2.75 to +1.0.  I intend to step down by mere .25 diopter increments as my progress allows.  

For the record:  I tried stepping down from +3.0 to +2.5 diopter (couldn't find +2.75 locally) but the change was too much - strained my eyes.  Also, Jake Steiner recommends going ONE DAY WITHOUT GLASSES each time you step down your lenses.  So between +3.0 and +2.75, spend a day WITHOUT ANY GLASSES.

The source for the glasses is AmericanReadingGlasses.com
They have special deals: 3-for-$15 and 6-for-$24 on selected frames only. 
I chose the 6-for-$24 ($4 each pair) and added two additional pairs.

So the eight pair of glasses cost $32 plus $4 delivery.  $36 TOTAL.  WooHoo!
I'm looking forward to good results, assuming my bizarre vision aberration is in my eyes and not my brain... Huh

Onward!
Tom

Tom, I'm so happy to hear the enthusiasm in your post! This is fuel to carry your forward. Feel free to poke around my many blog articles, as it seems we have a similar mindset. I am still learning not to try, to intend and receive and allow instead. Vision improvement has changed my personality for the better, for sure. And I'm doing it, every day. Just now I drove to the grocery store, then had to search for something on the shelves. Good vision practice! As your art is for you. Please keep us updated about your progress.
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#11
That's a good point about allowing accurate, healthy vision to happen.  I've been keeping that in mind as I do my vision exercises, relaxation techniques and while just using my eyes.  It's easy to lose sight of this, though, and slip back into trying/willing/forcing. 

Thanks for emphasizing the importance of that particular awareness.
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#12
(06-18-2017, 09:01 AM)okay Wrote: That's a good point about allowing accurate, healthy vision to happen.  I've been keeping that in mind as I do my vision exercises, relaxation techniques and while just using my eyes.  It's easy to lose sight of this, though, and slip back into trying/willing/forcing. 

Thanks for emphasizing the importance of that particular awareness.

Tom, yes, you got my point about allowing. Here's a related post with more on the same subject: https://www.iblindness.org/3173/intention-and-vision/.
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#13
Regarding your article: Intention and Vision

EXACTLY! Big Grin I've been "conflicted" about life/career choices for a long time, and have wondered if that reluctance is affecting my vision - perhaps my UNwillingness to see.

Also in regard to your article, sometimes I realize--after the fact--that I just saw/read something sans glasses without trying...  I stop and think, "Was I squinting through my eyelashes when that clarity occurred?"  (The eyelashes eliminate the array of ghost images).  Sometimes i'm almost certain I had not been squinting...and that's encouraging.


ALSO, I read your article: Yes, but I have Astigmatism!

That's very thought provoking!  I'm reading Dr. Bates' book right now and realize that my basic problem is hypermetropia.  And based on comments by Greg Marsh, my multi-image visual array seems to be an aspect of astigmatism.  Of course, I'm also a candidate for Presbyopia at my age.  Man, if I hadn't stumbled into these interrelated natural vision improvement methods I'd probably just shoot myself.  HA!  Not really, but I'm glad to know "all is not lost."

Last week I read Harry Benjamin's book, Better Eyesight Without Glasses c.1929 which expanded upon Dr Bates' methods by adding physical exercise of the body--particularly the neck and shoulders--and dietary restrictions, all under the heading "Nature Cure."  Apparently Mr Benjamin (England) and a partner or two were attempting to launch Nature Cure as a health improvement business at the time.  In any event, I think Mr. Benjamin was right about the relationship between the eyes and the rest of the body.

In my case, the neck, shoulders and spine are likely factors.  I have played guitar all my life, and added the bass guitar in recent years.  I play seated most of the time, which involves considerable twisting of the torso, and a LOT of twisting the neck down and to the left to see the fretboard - just as you describe in your article!  I have a mild scoliosis (twist in the spine) which is either caused by one slightly shorter leg, OR...the kink in the spine tilts the pelvis making it APPEAR that one leg is slightly shorter.  I notice also a slight lateral curve to my neck - and I think any or all of those may be affecting my vision in a neurological sense.   That's a GOOD thing, because I can work to correct some/most/all of that...and the result will be better overall health.  WIN / WIN.

I'm dedicated now to physical exercises that should counteract those factors.  Harry Benjamin's book (see download link above) describes five exercises that are very good for neck and shoulders.
 
Thanks for your continued helpful suggestions, Nancy.  

If others would like to contribute to this thread, PLEASE JUMP IN! Big Grin
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#14
I mentioned earlier how I am combining several natural vision approaches, which is to be expected considering the vast amount of information available online.  The Bates Method is the centerpiece and certain aspects of Harry Benjamin's 'Nature Cure' (c. 1929) and Jake Steiner's EndMiopia.org studies are important secondary methods.  In line with Jake Steiner's incremental stepping down of lens strength I purchased eight pair of reading glasses in .25 diopter increments - from +2.75 down to +1.0.   See details in posts above. 


Good News 1

After about three weeks, I have been able to step down from the +3.0 diopter glasses I've been using for about three years to the less powerful +2.75 diopter glasses.  It was slightly difficult at first.  I had to actively LOOK to focus on onscreen display type, and I still do have to intentionally FOCUS sometimes, but for the most part the +2.75 lenses function as the +3.0 lenses did.  Of course, some days are easier than others, but I'm being careful not to strain to see.  My eyes get tired more quickly now, but I think this process takes time, and it seems to take less effort each day.


Good News 2

I do several exercises that involve rolling the eyes in as wide a circle as possible.  In other words, I begin at 12:00 looking as high as possible.  Then rotate my eyes clockwise, looking as far to the right, bottom, left (following a circular route) as possible.

At first I could NOT do it!  My eyes refused to make a circle, and a single rotation took a relatively long time to complete.  Apparently my extra-ocular muscles (the outer ones that move the eyeball) were atrophied, strained and/or locked into place from years of relying on glasses that require looking "straight ahead."  The image below depicts a "very lumpy circle" which is the kind of path my eyes would follow when attempting to roll them in a perfect circle. 

[Image: rough_around_the_edges.png]

See below the image of a circle with a blue section in the upper-right quadrant.  At first my vision in that area was really weird, and I couldn't reliably form that part of the eye-rolling circle.  This affected particularly my right eye, which has always been "my worse eye."  My right eye (both eyes really, but the right eye more so) would not move through that part of the arc reliably, and what I saw in that quadrant was kind of JUMBLED...perhaps multiple images - it's difficult to describe or recall precisely.   

[Image: upper-right_quad_prob.png]

But NOW I can complete a very natural circle, and do so quickly.  The jumbled vision in the upper right quadrant is much improved, much reduced and my eyes feel so much more relaxed now.  This is progress!



More Clues About The True Nature of My Vision Problem

1. I learned the term "Higher Order Aberration" and I think my "Pizza Vision" probably falls under that category.  It's a pretty unique aberration.  If anyone here can contribute to my understanding of this, I would very much appreciate it

2. I recalled the following: The last time I attempted to buy prescription glasses they were less-expensive light-weight polycarbonate progressive lenses from a discount retail provider.  That was three years ago, when I lost my prescription tri-focals.  Their in-house optician decided on a very strong prescription.  I challenged it, but the glasses were made to that specification anyway.  They were TOO STRONG for me, but I agreed to try them - because I didn't know then what I know now!

I walked out of the store and happened to look at a concrete curb along the edge of the parking lot. I saw yellow and blue lines along the edges of the curb!  As I looked at other objects I saw the same anomaly on the edges of other objects.  See image below.  I walked back into the shop and rejected/returned the glasses.

Do these blue and yellow lines shed any light on what my actual vision problem might be?

[Image: curb_yel+blu.jpg]

IF YOU REPLY TO THIS POST, PLEASE DO NOT QUOTE THIS POST IN YOUR REPLY.  IT'S TOO LONG AND WILL MAKE THE THREAD MUCH MORE DIFFICULT FOR READERS TO FOLLOW/UNDERSTAND.  Thanks.
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#15
MODERATOR ==

I can no longer locate the Edit feature on this forum.

I would like to edit my post above.

Is it no longer possible to edit one's own posts?
Or am I missing something...?


Please advise, 
Thanks
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