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My "Vision Quest" Thread!
#1
Rainbow 
Hello, all! My name is Pamela. Smile I just wanted to start a thread to journal my progress as I go! I'll start with a (warning - long!) "case history."

I started wearing glasses at around 8 years old, give or take a year. I'm now 30! The prescriptions got stronger with every visit to the eye doctor, as is the norm when you wear glasses. When I got my driver's license at 18 (and still to this day), it stipulated that I need corrective lenses. Oh, and I *do* need them. For me to drive without glasses would be very unsafe!

I don't know my diopter, since it's been several years since my last exam and I've forgotten. The best I can remember is that my last set of contacts were labeled with -1.something or -2.something. There was a .25 or .50 difference between the eyes. I have a Snellen Chart, and on my first attempt to read it almost two weeks ago, I couldn't even make out the top letter (20/200 line), which suggests the diopter is at or stronger than -2.

I no longer have contacts, as they wore out, and I have a pair of glasses I bought when I was about 16. I always declined glasses any time I got an exam, since I only wanted contacts to have handy for special events when I wanted to be glasses-free - and not walk into furniture or small children!

So, that 14-year-old prescription has been my daily wear for all this time. And, wouldn't you know, my vision has not been deteriorating for as long as I've stopped get new exams and new stronger prescriptions! Btw, my main reason for not going is because I'm chronically broke, plus I've always hated my glasses and dread the idea of picking out new ones, and directing any of my time or money toward them. I have not always thought that a stronger prescription would be bad for me. Quite the opposite - I thought it was "good" to visit the eye doctor on a regular schedule and always have an up-to-date prescription! Now I'm glad I've always been "bad" to my eyes, because who knows how much my myopia would have progressed in these 14 years!

I have toyed with the idea of naturally healing my vision, as far back as my teenage years. But many times I'd get discouraged thinking it was a fraud. As the years went by, I became more and more inclined to believe it's real.

About two years ago, I bought the book "Relearning To See" by Thomas R. Quackenbush. I really loved it! Very informative and helpful! I took off my glasses and tried to practice all of the techniques, but I think I over did it. I was overwhelmed. I felt like if I didn't commit two hours a day to doing *every possible technique*, as well as keep my glasses off permanently, I'd never improve my vision. So, with such unrealistic standards, I burnt out and quit. I got tired of not being able to see my friend's faces when I talked to them, or see the screen on movie night. I've since learned a thing or two about moderation. Rolleyes

So, I'm at it again! I'm hoping that starting this thread will keep me from quitting too easily. Plus, I'm much more relaxed in my approach now. ("Relaxed", isn't that one of the keys, anyway?) I'll just do as much or as little as I'm able, and if it takes two months or two years, so be it. Any progress is good, and I won't pressure myself with an all-or-nothing attitude!

Okay, now that the history lesson is over, let's talk about the current progress! Big Grin

I started up almost two weeks ago. I pulled out my Snellen chart, put it up in the kitchen, and tested myself at 20 feet. I wrote down the results. Then put the results and the chart away, and told myself not to check again for a week. Last time I checked the chart several times a day, hoping for improvement. I was just torturing myself, feeling discouraged whenever there wasn't an obvious change!

My results - without glasses:

Left eye: X ( couldn't make out a thing )
Right eye: X
Both eyes: X

With glasses:

Left eye: 20/40
Right eye: 20/30
Both eyes: 20/30

My only objectives for the next week were to keep my glasses off whenever possible (fortunately, that was about 80-90% of the time), and palm as frequently as I could. Some days that added up to hours, and some days it was only a few five minute sessions throughout the day. I tried to do some of the long-swing and other eye exercises (up-down, left-right, circles, etc.), but didn't really have any goals or worry too much about it. Oh, I also made a point of holding my phone or any other close work *just* beyond my clear vision. Just another way to give my eyes a break from always focusing on things that are close up.

One week later, and I checked the chart again!

Without glasses:

Left: 20/200 (*barely* but I could read it!)
Right: X
Both: 20/200 (so, so, so barely discernible)

With glasses:

Left: 20/30
Right: 20/20
Both: 20/20 (barely)

Cool! It looks like I can actually reduce my prescription for driving! I only need 20/40 in one eye by my state's laws (New York). Since I'm not sure what my prescription is, I ordered two new pairs of glasses online, both very low. One is -1 diopter, and the other is -.50. They might not be strong enough, but at least they'll give me a jumping off point to try to discern what diopter I might be ready for. That means, if they're not strong enough, I will not be driving with them - don't worry! I went with such low diopters because even if they're too weak, they should still come into play later on as I continue to progress. Cool

After that test, which was on Saturday, I left the chart up on the inside of my cabinet door. Now it's out of sight, so I don't obsessively check it every time I walk by! But, I do open the cabinet and check it a couple times a day, just to gauge what makes my vision fluctuate. I don't expect a miracle every two hours, and I'm not being stressed or discouraged by it this time. Rolleyes

For this week, I've upped my game a bit. I do the long-swing every day. I do 100 swings/turns, usually three times a day. I do the up-down, left-right type of eye exercises daily, usually three times, and I continue to palm as frequently as I can. Also, keeping close work just out of clear sight.

This morning when I checked the chart shortly after waking up, I could clearly read the 20/100 line!! For about 2 seconds. Haha But it was there, and clear, and amazing! It kept being clear for a second or two after opening my eyes, and the clear moment got shorter and shorter each time I opened them, and was eventually gone. This was within about 5 minutes after getting out of bed. Oh, well, it was very exciting and I know it was a good sign, even if it's not here for good yet.

I'm only measuring my results on Saturdays, so who knows what that day will bring! I'll keep you all posted, though! Smile
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#2
(10-07-2015, 09:45 PM)VisionQuest Wrote: Hello, all! My name is Pamela. Smile I just wanted to start a thread to journal my progress as I go! I'll start with a (warning - long!) "case history."

I started wearing glasses at around 8 years old, give or take a year. I'm now 30! The prescriptions got stronger with every visit to the eye doctor, as is the norm when you wear glasses. When I got my driver's license at 18 (and still to this day), it stipulated that I need corrective lenses. Oh, and I *do* need them. For me to drive without glasses would be very unsafe!

I don't know my diopter, since it's been several years since my last exam and I've forgotten. The best I can remember is that my last set of contacts were labeled with -1.something or -2.something. There was a .25 or .50 difference between the eyes. I have a Snellen Chart, and on my first attempt to read it almost two weeks ago, I couldn't even make out the top letter (20/200 line), which suggests the diopter is at or stronger than -2.

I no longer have contacts, as they wore out, and I have a pair of glasses I bought when I was about 16. I always declined glasses any time I got an exam, since I only wanted contacts to have handy for special events when I wanted to be glasses-free - and not walk into furniture or small children!

So, that 14-year-old prescription has been my daily wear for all this time. And, wouldn't you know, my vision has not been deteriorating for as long as I've stopped get new exams and new stronger prescriptions! Btw, my main reason for not going is because I'm chronically broke, plus I've always hated my glasses and dread the idea of picking out new ones, and directing any of my time or money toward them. I have not always thought that a stronger prescription would be bad for me. Quite the opposite - I thought it was "good" to visit the eye doctor on a regular schedule and always have an up-to-date prescription! Now I'm glad I've always been "bad" to my eyes, because who knows how much my myopia would have progressed in these 14 years!

I have toyed with the idea of naturally healing my vision, as far back as my teenage years. But many times I'd get discouraged thinking it was a fraud. As the years went by, I became more and more inclined to believe it's real.

About two years ago, I bought the book "Relearning To See" by Thomas R. Quackenbush. I really loved it! Very informative and helpful! I took off my glasses and tried to practice all of the techniques, but I think I over did it. I was overwhelmed. I felt like if I didn't commit two hours a day to doing *every possible technique*, as well as keep my glasses off permanently, I'd never improve my vision. So, with such unrealistic standards, I burnt out and quit. I got tired of not being able to see my friend's faces when I talked to them, or see the screen on movie night. I've since learned a thing or two about moderation. Rolleyes

So, I'm at it again! I'm hoping that starting this thread will keep me from quitting too easily. Plus, I'm much more relaxed in my approach now. ("Relaxed", isn't that one of the keys, anyway?) I'll just do as much or as little as I'm able, and if it takes two months or two years, so be it. Any progress is good, and I won't pressure myself with an all-or-nothing attitude!

Okay, now that the history lesson is over, let's talk about the current progress! Big Grin

I started up almost two weeks ago. I pulled out my Snellen chart, put it up in the kitchen, and tested myself at 20 feet. I wrote down the results. Then put the results and the chart away, and told myself not to check again for a week. Last time I checked the chart several times a day, hoping for improvement. I was just torturing myself, feeling discouraged whenever there wasn't an obvious change!

My results - without glasses:

Left eye: X ( couldn't make out a thing )
Right eye: X
Both eyes: X

With glasses:

Left eye: 20/40
Right eye: 20/30
Both eyes: 20/30

My only objectives for the next week were to keep my glasses off whenever possible (fortunately, that was about 80-90% of the time), and palm as frequently as I could. Some days that added up to hours, and some days it was only a few five minute sessions throughout the day. I tried to do some of the long-swing and other eye exercises (up-down, left-right, circles, etc.), but didn't really have any goals or worry too much about it. Oh, I also made a point of holding my phone or any other close work *just* beyond my clear vision. Just another way to give my eyes a break from always focusing on things that are close up.

One week later, and I checked the chart again!

Without glasses:

Left: 20/200 (*barely* but I could read it!)
Right: X
Both: 20/200 (so, so, so barely discernible)

With glasses:

Left: 20/30
Right: 20/20
Both: 20/20 (barely)

Cool! It looks like I can actually reduce my prescription for driving! I only need 20/40 in one eye by my state's laws (New York). Since I'm not sure what my prescription is, I ordered two new pairs of glasses online, both very low. One is -1 diopter, and the other is -.50. They might not be strong enough, but at least they'll give me a jumping off point to try to discern what diopter I might be ready for. That means, if they're not strong enough, I will not be driving with them - don't worry! I went with such low diopters because even if they're too weak, they should still come into play later on as I continue to progress. Cool

After that test, which was on Saturday, I left the chart up on the inside of my cabinet door. Now it's out of sight, so I don't obsessively check it every time I walk by! But, I do open the cabinet and check it a couple times a day, just to gauge what makes my vision fluctuate. I don't expect a miracle every two hours, and I'm not being stressed or discouraged by it this time. Rolleyes

For this week, I've upped my game a bit. I do the long-swing every day. I do 100 swings/turns, usually three times a day. I do the up-down, left-right type of eye exercises daily, usually three times, and I continue to palm as frequently as I can. Also, keeping close work just out of clear sight.

This morning when I checked the chart shortly after waking up, I could clearly read the 20/100 line!! For about 2 seconds. Haha But it was there, and clear, and amazing! It kept being clear for a second or two after opening my eyes, and the clear moment got shorter and shorter each time I opened them, and was eventually gone. This was within about 5 minutes after getting out of bed. Oh, well, it was very exciting and I know it was a good sign, even if it's not here for good yet.

I'm only measuring my results on Saturdays, so who knows what that day will bring! I'll keep you all posted, though! Smile

Hi Pamela,

You have a great positive attitude, your enthusiasm will no doubt help you get to where you want to go, whether that takes a longer time, or not. Not pressuring yourself with deadlines and timeframes will only help you relax your approach with everything, as vision improvement is not a race in any way. The eyechart is a great tool to facilitate vision improvement. But be careful not to make it so much a test environment, rather, approach it more as tool to facilitate your vision improvement. Bates encouraged people to memorize the chart, to familiarize themselves with the curves and shapes of letters, to notice the slight motion of letters, to develop awareness of halos, to practive central fixation, and reinforce memory. He had schools hang a chart in classrooms because of the effect it had of looking at familiar letters each and every day, reinforcing in a positive way the memory and imagination. You never want to walk away from a chart feeling defeated, powerless, or disappointed, as many do because they approach it like an exam/test. While it' fine to use it to occasionally gauge where we are at, the vast majority of the time it should be utilized as the powerful tool that it is, at a near point where it is seen best, with least amount of strain. Have fun with it, as Nancy always says. Gradually increase the distance as your abilities improve. But always finish with the memory of something seen clearly, a memory that you can take with you for the rest of the day. This will also impact how you feel the next time you practice with it, considering it more of a friendly tool, and not so much a test.
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#3
(10-09-2015, 03:33 AM)arocarty Wrote: Hi Pamela,

You have a great positive attitude, your enthusiasm will no doubt help you get to where you want to go, whether that takes a longer time, or not. Not pressuring yourself with deadlines and timeframes will only help you relax your approach with everything, as vision improvement is not a race in any way. The eyechart is a great tool to facilitate vision improvement. But be careful not to make it so much a test environment, rather, approach it more as tool to facilitate your vision improvement. Bates encouraged people to memorize the chart, to familiarize themselves with the curves and shapes of letters, to notice the slight motion of letters, to develop awareness of halos, to practive central fixation, and reinforce memory. He had schools hang a chart in classrooms because of the effect it had of looking at familiar letters each and every day, reinforcing in a positive way the memory and imagination. You never want to walk away from a chart feeling defeated, powerless, or disappointed, as many do because they approach it like an exam/test. While it' fine to use it to occasionally gauge where we are at, the vast majority of the time it should be utilized as the powerful tool that it is, at a near point where it is seen best, with least amount of strain. Have fun with it, as Nancy always says. Gradually increase the distance as your abilities improve. But always finish with the memory of something seen clearly, a memory that you can take with you for the rest of the day. This will also impact how you feel the next time you practice with it, considering it more of a friendly tool, and not so much a test.

Thank you, Arocarty! Yes, one of the reasons I decided to leave it up this week is so that I wouldn't get anxious or excited putting it up and checking it just that one day a week! I wanted to have the chance to get familiar and comfortable with looking at it. But, yea, even now I'm not so much working with it or using it as a tool, as much as just a test. I feel like recording my progress will help to keep me motivated, and reinforce my beliefs that my vision can be (and has!) improved.

I might begin working with it the way you described. I'm still trying to keep my goals very simple. I know why I gave up before (and also have given up on many other things unrelated to vision improvement). If I set a goal for myself and don't stick to it, I pretty much fall apart and scrap the whole project! Not very admirable, I know. Rolleyes

Perhaps working with the chart and practicing central fixation will be the one of the next additions to my daily practices. : ) I figured every week I'd add a new exercise or habit to focus on, but I think this next week I'll continue with the same goals I have now; minimal glasses-wearing, regular palming breaks, eye movement/stretching, and the long swing.

When I begin working more with the chart, do you have a suggestion of how or what techniques? I find there are so many different practices and methods, it's overwhelming to decide on which ones to do! Is there a particular thing that worked best to imprive your vision, or others you know?
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#4
Spend a lot of time outside without wearing corrective lenses. The more faraway distances around you in your line of sight, the better.
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#5
Update after this week's Saturday (Sight-urday!) acuity check. I still get occasional flashes of the 20/100 line with no glasses. But I'm not "counting" that, as it's very random and inconsistent.

Without glasses:

L:20/200 (quite blurry, but no longer "barely")
R:20/200 (barely!)
B:20/200

With glasses:

L:20/30
R:20/20
B:20/20 (clearly, this time!)

I'm eager to get my new glasses in the mail! I don't want to be corrected to 20/20 whenever something weaker will do. Very slight difference this week, but still an improvement! I'm happy! Smile

(10-10-2015, 06:52 AM)sleepmaster Wrote: Spend a lot of time outside without wearing corrective lenses. The more faraway distances around you in your line of sight, the better.

Thank you! I try to do this several times a day when I walk my dogs. I can see for blocks as the streets in my neighborhood are quite straight and open. More would certainly be better! Hopefully we still have several more nice warm days left this fall!
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#6
Pamela, you can take the chart outside and try it in natural light if you want. There is no right or wrong way, which I didn't always know. I thought I had to stand 20 feet away, and gradually see more and more. I had a really hard time with this, and felt like a failure. I now stand or sit between 3 feet away for a small chart and 5 to 20 for a large one, and PLAY with looking at it. (arocarty is right, as usual.) This post might give you some ideas: http://www.iblindness.org/1364/eye-chart-games/
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#7
VisionQuest, one way to think of it, is looking at signs outside is like looking at charts outside at greater distances.
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#8
(10-09-2015, 12:39 PM)VisionQuest Wrote:
(10-09-2015, 03:33 AM)arocarty Wrote: Hi Pamela,

You have a great positive attitude, your enthusiasm will no doubt help you get to where you want to go, whether that takes a longer time, or not. Not pressuring yourself with deadlines and timeframes will only help you relax your approach with everything, as vision improvement is not a race in any way. The eyechart is a great tool to facilitate vision improvement. But be careful not to make it so much a test environment, rather, approach it more as tool to facilitate your vision improvement. Bates encouraged people to memorize the chart, to familiarize themselves with the curves and shapes of letters, to notice the slight motion of letters, to develop awareness of halos, to practive central fixation, and reinforce memory. He had schools hang a chart in classrooms because of the effect it had of looking at familiar letters each and every day, reinforcing in a positive way the memory and imagination. You never want to walk away from a chart feeling defeated, powerless, or disappointed, as many do because they approach it like an exam/test. While it' fine to use it to occasionally gauge where we are at, the vast majority of the time it should be utilized as the powerful tool that it is, at a near point where it is seen best, with least amount of strain. Have fun with it, as Nancy always says. Gradually increase the distance as your abilities improve. But always finish with the memory of something seen clearly, a memory that you can take with you for the rest of the day. This will also impact how you feel the next time you practice with it, considering it more of a friendly tool, and not so much a test.

Thank you, Arocarty! Yes, one of the reasons I decided to leave it up this week is so that I wouldn't get anxious or excited putting it up and checking it just that one day a week! I wanted to have the chance to get familiar and comfortable with looking at it. But, yea, even now I'm not so much working with it or using it as a tool, as much as just a test. I feel like recording my progress will help to keep me motivated, and reinforce my beliefs that my vision can be (and has!) improved.

I might begin working with it the way you described. I'm still trying to keep my goals very simple. I know why I gave up before (and also have given up on many other things unrelated to vision improvement). If I set a goal for myself and don't stick to it, I pretty much fall apart and scrap the whole project! Not very admirable, I know. Rolleyes

Perhaps working with the chart and practicing central fixation will be the one of the next additions to my daily practices. : ) I figured every week I'd add a new exercise or habit to focus on, but I think this next week I'll continue with the same goals I have now; minimal glasses-wearing, regular palming breaks, eye movement/stretching, and the long swing.

When I begin working more with the chart, do you have a suggestion of how or what techniques? I find there are so many different practices and methods, it's overwhelming to decide on which ones to do! Is there a particular thing that worked best to imprive your vision, or others you know?

Hmmm. a few particular things helped, but to first put it in a nutshell, I had to stop trying so hard. Second, I had to come to the realization that we cannot change what is 'out there' in our visual field, the change has to come from within, then what's 'out there' takes care of itself without further ado. Bates once wrote in his chapter on strain that: "When sight is perfect the letters on the test card are waiting, perfectly black and perfectly distinct, to be recognized. They do not have to be sought; they are there."

I was very gung ho at the beginning, determined, disciplined, trying to 'strengthen' the eye muscles in every conceivable way, to no avail. It wasn't until I started focusing on the more subtle, simple things, such as just trying to relax my mind, noticing the illusions of normal sight, reading fine print close to the eyes, just closing the eyes, that I felt a greater or lesser release of hidden tension. And feel it I did right inside the head. Vision is one of the few things in life that does not reward you for effort in that the harder you try the less you will get. The principles are very very simple, but to master them is another story. Most people get very stuck on numbers, and on trying to change what is 'out there' which can become an endless quagmire and grasping at anything that sound good on paper or 'logical.' Be persistent, but keep it simple, change it up when one thing doesn't seem to be going anywhere, and try to become more aware of the things you are doing that pose interference with the natural functioning of vision at all distances. Not too tall an order?!
Regards,
Andrew
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#9
great topic! i keep my fingers crossed and let's go!
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#10
Thank you for the input, everyone! I have to admit, these past few days I've been slipping. Not taking the time to palm because I'm "too busy", or keeping my glasses on simply because clear vision is comforting when I'm feeling a little stressed or hurried. I need to remember that 1 minute of palming is better than nothing, so just take a quick break!

I traveled out of town this past weekend and stayed with relatives. I drove about 4 hours each way with my glasses on. I don't think the glasses necessarily created strain, but as I'd gotten in the habit of palming several times a day, my eyes were practically screaming for a break in the afternoon! I just wanted cover my eyes and rest sooo badly, but was also very happy to be with my family and didn't want to excuse myself just to rest my eyes. Forget about palming in front of anybody, I'm already the "weird one" in the family! Haha

That weekend threw me off pretty badly. I got into the habit of keeping my glasses on, and ignoring my eyes, even when they were screaming a message loud and clear!

I know I'll get back in the groove. But I am currently feeling like I threw away some of my progress so far, and "wasted" almost a whole week of potential progress.

On a happier note, I got my new glasses in the mail today!! They are too weak to serve any purpose at this point, but it's nice to have them here as future step-downs. I've placed an order for two more slightly stronger glasses. At this point, I probably could've spent the same amount of money by going to an eye doctor and finding out what my actual prescription is! But, I should eventually need each of these pairs as my vision improves, and I like the idea of having them ready and waiting for me!

I thought my diopter might be -2.something. But, after trying on the -1 diopter and still only being able to make out the 20/200 line, I'm starting to think it's stronger than that!

Nancy and Arocarty, thank you for the chart tips! Nancy, I really appreciated your post about the different games to play. I tried a few just the other day! I found that it felt more like looking at a picture or even reading something, in the sense that I wasn't focusing on my clarity (or lack) of vision, but simply focusing on the object in front of me. I think that's how vision's supposed to work! Just seeing what you look at, and not constantly critiquing or questioning your ability to see it! Smile
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#11
Hi Pamela, and you're doing great! Don't worry about "lost time" -- I'm thinking of that proverb "Fall down 7 times, get up 8". Progress is rarely steady and linear. Just keep at it. Good work!
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#12
If you're -2 and trying to get into the -1s, well what halped me a lot were heavily wooded park trails, without glasses of course. I needed the added details of all that tree bark and branches since the detail of wide open shopping areas and parking lots level of detail was not as good at going sub -2 as it was in getting me from -3 to -2.

Ditching your glasses is the most important thing, by far. If you can find a way to get rides with other people or walk to places, that will really help. Going without glasses all the time is much more important than palming. If you're only around -2, you are very cllose to being able to pass the dmv vision test without glasses. I think Meir Schneider may have gotten the vivsion restriction removed from his drivers license with worse vision than you have. He palmed 11 hours straight right before his dmv vision test to pass it.

I'm not saying to break the law or anything. Just do what you can do. In my state, you are allowed to get a daytime only drivers license that requires 20/70 vision or better, which you may have right now. as that tends to correspond to the -1.5 to -2.0 diopter area.
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#13
(10-15-2015, 09:04 PM)VisionQuest Wrote: That weekend threw me off pretty badly. I got into the habit of keeping my glasses on, and ignoring my eyes, even when they were screaming a message loud and clear!

I know I'll get back in the groove. But I am currently feeling like I threw away some of my progress so far, and "wasted" almost a whole week of potential progress.


Nancy and Arocarty, thank you for the chart tips! Nancy, I really appreciated your post about the different games to play. I tried a few just the other day! I found that it felt more like looking at a picture or even reading something, in the sense that I wasn't focusing on my clarity (or lack) of vision, but simply focusing on the object in front of me. I think that's how vision's supposed to work! Just seeing what you look at, and not constantly critiquing or questioning your ability to see it! Smile

Hi Pamela,
Right, don't let anyone pressure you or rush you, and just as important don't pressure yourself - remember, you are on your on time frame and path with this stuff. There is no script. Your very right that seeing is just seeing, not constantly evaluating, critiquing your clarity, testing it. And whether you are wearing weaker lenses or none, you can still keep practicing good vision habits. Our high-brain, cognitive functions have a strong penchant for running interference with the lower-brain, autonomic functions, from which almost all of our vision is governed. You can't consciously control everything, but you can encourage and influence it through conscious repetition of good habits, so to speak. Persistent, gentle encouragement and nudging. Whether the eyes respond or not, you keep persisting with good shifting, swinging, and central fixation, without the oversight of the visual judge which is inside all of us.

Best,
Andrew
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#14
Thank you so much for your encouragement, everyone!  : ) It was hard not to feel defeated and start slacking or loosing hope, especially when my "Sighturday" progress report ended up being nearly the same as before I started three weeks ago!  Oh, no!  But, I just tried to not worry too much and reminded myself that if I made the progress once, I can do it again.

These were the results on October 15th.

Without glasses:

L: 20/200 (barely!)
R: X
B: 20/200

With glasses:

L: 20/40
R: 20/40
B: 20/40

Nancy, that's a great proverb!  Thank you!  The past doesn't have to predict the future, you just keep moving forward.  : )

 

Sleepmaster, I love going for walks and in the summer can walk or just sit in a park for hours!  But it's getting chilly now, so I try to at least walk up and down my street a couple times a day.  It's only about 5 minutes, but at least it gives my eyes a little chance to "stretch"!  I also take longer walks any day that's warm enough.  

 I wouldn't feel safe driving without my glasses, no matter what my license says!  But I have been avoiding driving as much as possible.  I drive 20-60 minutes 2-3 days a week, for work.  The other days I work from home.  I also sometimes put my glasses on to speak with clients, since I can barely read facial expressions or even recognize people without them!  But, I'm hopeful that one of my new step-down pairs (in the mail right now!) will give me a much weaker option than my driving pair. So I can always be using the absolute weakest diopter necessary.

Andrew, thank you for that! I have also noticed that when I do wear my glasses now, I realize how little I ever move my eyes. I mean, I'm constantly reminding myself to blink and shift and not just "zone out", but it's amazing how quickly putting my glasses on zombifies my eyes! I'm sure that proper vision habits even with glasses would have an effect on majntaining - or losing - clarity.

Over the past weekend, a friend who's never worn glasses in her life, tried on my -.5 diopter pair, just to see what it was like. She said "Oh, I don't like that!" and took them right off. She explained that they didn't really change her vision, but that she felt like she was looking through "the bottom of a glass", and that her vision was funneled. She brought her hands up and curled her fingers into circles around each eye. Yup, she nailed it! Hahaha
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#15
Sighturday progress report! Slight improvement from last week - woo-hoo!

Without glasses:

L: 20/200
R: 20/200
B: 20/200

I didn't check my glasses acuity, because I realize that without a step-down pair available, the results are irrelevant. Whether it's 20/40 or 20/10, I can't lower my prescription at the moment, so why stress my eyes out by putting them on? I have a new pair in the mail that I'm hopin will be strong enough for driving, if I can get my eyes back to 20/20 with my current pair. But I have to wait until they get here!

Right now I'm in the middle of a FIVE DAY weekend with no need to put my glasses on once!! So happy about this. I've been spoiling my eyes so far, with plenty of palming breaks, short outings to look across long distances, swinging, staying well-hydrated and relaxed, and even drinking carrot juice every day! Haha Oh, and significantly reducing my screen time on my phone/tablet.

Yesterday I had a few moments of incredibly clear vision. I had just taken a 45-minute walk outside, the sat at my kithen table for about 5 minured of palming. When I removed my hands while, words on my calendar that I'm very accustomed to seeing as a blur were extremely easy to see. I was so amazed, I actually shouted something I can't even type here! Hahaha It was unbelievable! It lasted for almost a minute. I could tell it was fading and knew it wouldn't last, but it was still very exciting and encouraging!

I'm sort of kicking myself that I didn't start this up in the summertime. I regularly walk for hours most days in the summer. Those outings would have been so helpful if I'd taken my glasses off. Oh, well, I had other things on my plate in the summer. I guess everything happens in it's time. : )

Excited for what the next week will bring, including a new pair of glasses that may allow me to step down! : )
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