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Yelaina's Diary - Newbie
#1
Hey,
I am new here.

Thought I'll start a diary to keep track of any progress.
Absolute beginner, I really have no clue how to start this process.
I have myopia, it's pretty bad, it increased yearly, for over 10 yrs.
About time I reversed this trend.

What do I do?
Step 1: ???
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#2
My condition is same as yours (A beginner). I have already started Palming (currently not effective to me), Sunning (yes, refreshes my eyes), Swinging (Most effective), Central fixation and Shifting showing a little Improvement.
You may find a lot of people whose experiences are amazing.
(Start with anything which you find most Effective)
Goodluck.
Big GrinBig GrinBig GrinBig GrinBig Grin
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#3
(10-25-2014, 05:55 AM)RSW2892 Wrote: My condition is same as yours (A beginner). I have already started Palming (currently not effective to me), Sunning (yes, refreshes my eyes), Swinging (Most effective), Central fixation and Shifting showing a little Improvement.
You may find a lot of people whose experiences are amazing.
(Start with anything which you find most Effective)
Goodluck.
Big GrinBig GrinBig GrinBig GrinBig Grin

Hey, thanks for answering.Smile
More Questions:Undecided

Palming:
I take it as palms of hands on top of eyes?
When I rest a palm over my eye,
I can feel the warmth on the eyelids transfer to my hands.
Is that the purpose? To transfer heat, to remove excess heat?


Sunning:
Is this safe?
Common advice I grew up with is not to look directly at the sun, is to wear sunglasses, in sunny weather, when driving, even in winter if there is ice reflecting glares in the middle of a sunny winter day.

What is Sunning for?
Vitamin D uptake, like the recommended 15 min in sunshine to get daily vitamin D?

Will sun rays damage; like sun rays and skin damage?
How many minutes of Sunning?
Is there a time of day, like not at noon when the sun is the strongest?


Swinging:
I don't know if I am doing this correctly or too fast;
I just move my head from left to right, and I feel like I am on one of those office chairs when I used to spin around on them and the whole room swhoosh around in a blur, then I feel dizzy and sleepy afterwards.


Central fixation & Shifting:
I don't really know how to do these.
Hints?
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#4
I took off my glasses for 1 hour today.
This is what I felt and thought:
I can see without my glasses, but everything is blurry.
I can see the colours, no problems there seeing identifying hues.
For example, each smilies are a blur of yellow or shades of orange, but colours merge like a blot, can't see the black white pink or red that defines each smilies.

Me thinks that if I can see each hue then it is not a problem of not able to see.
The question is how do I bring all the colours out of blurriness into orderly sense making lines. I can lean in closer to the screen and see. But that is not the answer. I would prefer to see things clearly from a distance, the further the better. I can also squint and see a little clearer. But that is not the answer. I would prefer to not stress my eyelids and eyeballs, it is kind of awkward doing that. So if the answer is me sitting in better posture, head in ergonomic position and not stressing eyelids to squint, and not having nose nearly kiss my computer screen then what do I do to move myself naturally further away from the screen yet seeing a little clearer?
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#5
What makes one see?
a) the computer
b) the paper
c) the letters
d) the objects
e) the eyeball
f) the cornea
g) the lens
h) the aqueous matter
i) the rods
j) the cones
k) the retina
l) the optic chiasm
n) the visual cortex
o) the brain
p) the mind
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#6
(10-28-2014, 01:36 PM)Yelaina Wrote: What makes one see?
a) the computer
b) the paper
c) the letters
d) the objects
e) the eyeball
f) the cornea
g) the lens
h) the aqueous matter
i) the rods
j) the cones

k) the retina
l) the optic chiasm
n) the visual cortex
o) the brain

p) the mind
I've bolded my answers.

So during today's hour without glasses,
I pondered on what really makes one see, which cell matters:

Computer, paper, font/letters, objects, eyeball, cornea, lens, aqueous matter in eyeball are not important.
Why? Because I think light travels past those objects and eventually reflect on to the retina, which is a bunch or rods and cones and cells. I imagine that it is up to the brain to interpret what the rods and cone cells fire as neuronal signals to the visual cortex inside the brain and interpreted by the mind. I suppose the few cells that usually fire when wearing glasses are the few cells the mind is used to collecting and integrating info from. If that is the case, it would be up to training the mind to interpret signals from other cells instead of focussing on the few cells that it is used to.

(Please feel free to answer differently, I want to know what you guys think!).
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#7
(10-28-2014, 07:33 PM)Yelaina Wrote:
(10-28-2014, 01:36 PM)Yelaina Wrote: What makes one see?
a) the computer
b) the paper
c) the letters
d) the objects
e) the eyeball
f) the cornea
g) the lens
h) the aqueous matter
i) the rods
j) the cones

k) the retina
l) the optic chiasm
n) the visual cortex
o) the brain

p) the mind
I've bolded my answers.

So during today's hour without glasses,
I pondered on what really makes one see, which cell matters:

Computer, paper, font/letters, objects, eyeball, cornea, lens, aqueous matter in eyeball are not important.
Why? Because I think light travels past those objects and eventually reflect on to the retina, which is a bunch or rods and cones and cells. I imagine that it is up to the brain to interpret what the rods and cone cells fire as neuronal signals to the visual cortex inside the brain and interpreted by the mind. I suppose the few cells that usually fire when wearing glasses are the few cells the mind is used to collecting and integrating info from. If that is the case, it would be up to training the mind to interpret signals from other cells instead of focussing on the few cells that it is used to.

(Please feel free to answer differently, I want to know what you guys think!).

Peter Grunwald, developer of the Eyebody Method, teaches that we over-use central vision and under-use peripheral vision, and glasses just deepen that pattern. So yes, I like the way you think. Vision is much more (and deeper and richer and more brightly colored) than clarity of the letters on an eye chart!
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#8
November 2, 2014
- 1 hour of glasses off.
- by squinting after at least 30 min, I finally picked out the letters: A B C D the size of a mug about 1-2 meters away from me, the letters were blurry before.
---
From the past week, I can feel a tiredness on the eyeballs, and the muscles around the eyes, and on the ridges of the ears from where the glasses sat.
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#9
Is squinting good or bad for eyes?
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#10
(11-02-2014, 09:38 PM)RSW2892 Wrote: Is squinting good or bad for eyes?
Bad for eyes, because it adds strain and tension.

(11-02-2014, 08:38 PM)Yelaina Wrote: - by squinting after at least 30 min, I finally picked out the letters: A B C D the size of a mug about 1-2 meters away from me, the letters were blurry before.

Oops error in making sentences.
I did not "squint for 30 min". That would be painful.

It should be:

November 2, 2014
- 30 min of glasses off.
- Initial 10 minutes, I can only see blurriness around the room, I could not pick out A B C D.
- I looked around the room: far and near, high and low, and shifted my eyeballs such that I tried to remove the tensions that had built up on them.
(Like moving muscles in a stretch after running.)
- I think the glasses from all day of wearing it, caused tension or tiredness to build up around the eyeball.
It feels awful and very tiring, as if it went skiing and I have no clue when the muscles will relax again. (Leg muscles tired from skiing usually resolves the next day after sleeping, but the evening after a ski trip is always like terrible.)[The question is when will eyeballs relieve their own tension? How much sleep or rest?]
- During most of the 30 min, I did not strain or focus my whole eyeballs to look. - When I felt like I did that, I would try to relax them.
- I think there is a second type of focus which is by the eye's iris muscles.
- I would not try to focus my eye's iris if I was trying to focus with the brow muscles or eye lids; as I believe moving the brow muscles and eye lids are part of squinting.
- At the end of the 30 minutes after trying to find my way around relieving stress on the eyeball, by shifiting both eyes from left to right, up and down upper left and lower right, upper right corner and lower left corner, all slowly but simultaneously without squinting or focussing my whole eyeball.
- I could feel very brief seconds of relief to the tensions here and there, but I still could not relieve all the tension they held.
- By using my eye's iris to focus on the alphabets I could pick them out;
but I was semi-cheating when I wanted to bring the alphabet shapes to more clarity, I used a bit of eye lids and brows to do that so the additional activity would count as straining.
---
Reply
#11
(11-03-2014, 07:10 AM)Yelaina Wrote:
(11-02-2014, 09:38 PM)RSW2892 Wrote: Is squinting good or bad for eyes?
Bad for eyes, because it adds strain and tension.

(11-02-2014, 08:38 PM)Yelaina Wrote: - by squinting after at least 30 min, I finally picked out the letters: A B C D the size of a mug about 1-2 meters away from me, the letters were blurry before.

Oops error in making sentences.
I did not "squint for 30 min". That would be painful.

It should be:

November 2, 2014
- 30 min of glasses off.
- Initial 10 minutes, I can only see blurriness around the room, I could not pick out A B C D.
- I looked around the room: far and near, high and low, and shifted my eyeballs such that I tried to remove the tensions that had built up on them.
(Like moving muscles in a stretch after running.)
- I think the glasses from all day of wearing it, caused tension or tiredness to build up around the eyeball.
It feels awful and very tiring, as if it went skiing and I have no clue when the muscles will relax again. (Leg muscles tired from skiing usually resolves the next day after sleeping, but the evening after a ski trip is always like terrible.)[The question is when will eyeballs relieve their own tension? How much sleep or rest?]
- During most of the 30 min, I did not strain or focus my whole eyeballs to look. - When I felt like I did that, I would try to relax them.
- I think there is a second type of focus which is by the eye's iris muscles.
- I would not try to focus my eye's iris if I was trying to focus with the brow muscles or eye lids; as I believe moving the brow muscles and eye lids are part of squinting.
- At the end of the 30 minutes after trying to find my way around relieving stress on the eyeball, by shifiting both eyes from left to right, up and down upper left and lower right, upper right corner and lower left corner, all slowly but simultaneously without squinting or focussing my whole eyeball.
- I could feel very brief seconds of relief to the tensions here and there, but I still could not relieve all the tension they held.
- By using my eye's iris to focus on the alphabets I could pick them out;
but I was semi-cheating when I wanted to bring the alphabet shapes to more clarity, I used a bit of eye lids and brows to do that so the additional activity would count as straining.
---

I like your attitude of exploration, and your insights, as well as not letting yourself cheat (like by squinting) and thinking you're seeing better that way. Keep up the good work!
Reply
#12
For the past month,
I have been trying David's phrase: "putting the horses before the cart."
Very challenging to do continuously, it seems like the cart always runs ahead of the horse... It is more like the cart is waiting for the horses to catch up...
I can probably last 10 seconds.
Any tips?


(11-03-2014, 08:36 AM)Nancy Wrote: I like your attitude of exploration, and your insights, as well as not letting yourself cheat (like by squinting) and thinking you're seeing better that way. Keep up the good work!
Thank you! Smile
Reply
#13
Slacking off, I did not take off my glasses once a day for the past 2 weeks; oops!
I forgot to actively place the cart behind the horse; I must make this a habbit...

My crime:
I was too caught up imagining the text from the books or articles that I was sipping,
and I forgot about paying attention to what my eyes were feeling,
now that I am back here posting, I can feel my eyes are tired from today's online reading.
If anything maybe that is the reason: Imagining stuff I read vs. Imagining what my eyes are feeling.
I should prioritize: Imagining what my eyes are feeling 1st, and Imagining what I read 2nd.
This brings me back to my childhood. I remember being an avid reader, reading 1 book a day for 3-4 hours straight. But I did not remember paying attention to what my eyes were feeling... I think big oops there; but I did not know that there exist horses. Now I should go get something orange for them...
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#14
(11-20-2014, 05:15 AM)Yelaina Wrote: For the past month,
I have been trying David's phrase: "putting the horses before the cart."
Very challenging to do continuously, it seems like the cart always runs ahead of the horse... It is more like the cart is waiting for the horses to catch up...
I can probably last 10 seconds.
Any tips?
This morning, I think I've hacked this problem.

Training horses: (Training eyes to moveSmile
1) Take off the glasses.
2) Hold a hand infront of you.
3) See the fine details of the hand.
4) Move hand away from face until the fine details just begins to blur.
5) Stop there, note the distance mentally (mine is 2-3inches); here you just proved to yourself that you can see fine details perfectly without glasses (mines is <2-3 inches). You also know that there is a distance away from your face that has a point where it starts to blur (mines is crossing the 2-3 inches point.
6) Drop you hand. Put a small stuffed animal there/ interesting object with fine details. (but not something to block your whole view, you will want to see the walls, the room, the background...)
7) Imagine a hoola hoop in mid air, like a pizza flat horizontally leveled at the eyes, and the stuff animal sitting on the end nearest to you.
8) Look and move your sight/attention around the track of the hoola hoop.
9) Don't get scared if you look past your blurry point, just keep following the hoola hoop, it will eventually circle back to your hand or the object you are looking at, and you will be confident that you will see fine details, like the fur on the stuffed animal, or the lines on your hand, once you travel back to the starting point of the hoolahoop.
(and don't strain while following the hoop, keep it a smooth movement. )
10) There, your cart wants to look at the fur, but your horses are going to take some time to look close and look far before getting to look at the object of interest.
11) Hoola hoop can be imagined with larger and larger diameter to fill a whole room or park. Enjoy the background behind the object.

12)
If horizontal gets boring.
Variations:
Try: Put the hoola hoop at a diagonal, vertical...
Reply
#15
(12-31-2014, 02:26 PM)Yelaina Wrote:
(11-20-2014, 05:15 AM)Yelaina Wrote: For the past month,
I have been trying David's phrase: "putting the horses before the cart."
Very challenging to do continuously, it seems like the cart always runs ahead of the horse... It is more like the cart is waiting for the horses to catch up...
I can probably last 10 seconds.
Any tips?
This morning, I think I've hacked this problem.

Training horses: (Training eyes to moveSmile
1) Take off the glasses.
2) Hold a hand infront of you.
3) See the fine details of the hand.
4) Move hand away from face until the fine details just begins to blur.
5) Stop there, note the distance mentally (mine is 2-3inches); here you just proved to yourself that you can see fine details perfectly without glasses (mines is <2-3 inches). You also know that there is a distance away from your face that has a point where it starts to blur (mines is crossing the 2-3 inches point.
6) Drop you hand. Put a small stuffed animal there/ interesting object with fine details. (but not something to block your whole view, you will want to see the walls, the room, the background...)
7) Imagine a hoola hoop in mid air, like a pizza flat horizontally leveled at the eyes, and the stuff animal sitting on the end nearest to you.
8) Look and move your sight/attention around the track of the hoola hoop.
9) Don't get scared if you look past your blurry point, just keep following the hoola hoop, it will eventually circle back to your hand or the object you are looking at, and you will be confident that you will see fine details, like the fur on the stuffed animal, or the lines on your hand, once you travel back to the starting point of the hoolahoop.
(and don't strain while following the hoop, keep it a smooth movement. )
10) There, your cart wants to look at the fur, but your horses are going to take some time to look close and look far before getting to look at the object of interest.
11) Hoola hoop can be imagined with larger and larger diameter to fill a whole room or park. Enjoy the background behind the object.

12)
If horizontal gets boring.
Variations:
Try: Put the hoola hoop at a diagonal, vertical...

Seeing fine details that close is simply a symptom of being VERY nearsighted.
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